Staff Spotlights: Wes Summers

Wes Summers, Student Affairs Digital Engagement Lead

Wes Summers, Student Affairs Digital Engagement Lead

Wes Summers

Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs - Student Affairs Digital Engagement Lead

Learner - Achiever - Intellection - Analytical - Relator


 

Wes was nominated by a colleage for a Staff Spotlight; here's what his nominator had to share:

Having produced websites that served as a benchmark for campus for nearly 15 years, Wes Summers, Student Affairs digital engagement lead, was asked to lead the division’s new digital engagement initiative… and then Covid-19 hit. Perfectly illustrating his can-do attitude, Wes has simultaneously grown digital engagement opportunities for students and nimbly provided exceptional web and digital support for the division and the university in response to the pandemic. Not only is Wes known for his attractive web designs and innovative solutions, but he is also a wonderful colleague with whom everyone enjoys collaborating. Student Affairs is very proud of Wes and loves that he is a part of our team.


Are you from Georgia? If not, where are you from? (i.e., where do you call “home”?)

I am from Georgia. I grew up in Gwinnett County, but I’ve lived in the Athens area off and on for the 20+ years.

How long have you worked at UGA?

I started at UGA in 2007, so around 14 years.

What does a “day in the life” look like for you at work?

I usually start out the day by checking websites and emails to make sure nothing is on fire and checking in with my intern and web developer to make sure we’re on the same page about what tasks our team is focusing on and they have what they need from me to get their work done. Typically, I have a mix of meetings and project work that I do throughout the day. I usually knock out smaller scale, short term tasks before lunch to get them off the queue quickly. Then, I transition to working on longer term projects in the afternoon. Most likely someone will contact me with a troubleshooting issue or task that needs my attention at some point during the day, so I do my best to prioritize those requests so that I’m not holding up my colleague’s work. I generally force myself to get out of my office and take a lunch hour, otherwise I’d tend to eat at my desk and work at the same time, which could lead to burn out. I usually have at least one or two meetings on a typical day in between working on projects and tasks as well. I find that too much routine becomes tedious, and a little variety keeps things fresh, so I don’t always stick to that formula.

What are three things you love most about your job?

The variety of the work, that my team produces tangible solutions that directly help to execute our division’s mission, and the excellent people I work with!

Who do you look up to/ admire?

I tend to admire most the people who had or have that unique combination of both brilliance and determination that allowed them to achieve world changing accomplishments despite the socio-political obstacles they faced or face during their lifetimes. To name a few:

  • Galileo
  • Ada Lovelace
  • Marie Curie
  • Frederick Douglass
  • Alan Turing

What are things that you do for fun/hobbies?

Most of my free time these days is spent playing with my three daughters, but I also like to fish, hike, mountain bike, and garden when I get the chance.

What might be something that you would like other staff to know about your job?

One thing that I think most of my colleagues already understand is that the only way my small team can manage the number of websites and applications that we do is because we build everything to be easily managed by the individual departments across the division. Without that collaboration and partnership with our departments, we’d never be able to keep so many sites and applications up to date and running smoothly. In that sense, our colleagues across the division who work in our systems and manage the content on their respective sites are key to our success. It’s truly a division-wide team effort!

What might be some ways that staff could collaborate or partner with you?

As the Digital Engagement Lead for Student Affairs, I’m responsible for strategizing on new ways to use technology to increase student engagement in our programs and services. A great way to collaborate with me is to let me know if your area is using some new or existing technology to deliver your programs or services in a new and better way for students. It may be something that we could adopt and scale throughout our division.

Anything you would like to share that you would like other staff to know about you?

Nah.

What advice would you have for new staff joining UGA Student Affairs?

Make as many connections as you can across both the Division and UGA. That could lead you to more opportunities down the road.

What is one question you wished we asked and what is the answer?

No idea…

What is the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

One of the coolest things I’ve ever done was to hike the Narrows in Zion National Park. The Narrows a 16-mile day hike through a slot canyon along the Virgin River. The trail is the river, and sections of it become narrow enough that you can reach out and touch both walls of the canyon at once, which rise straight up over 2,400 feet above you. We hiked it in a high-water year, so we swam almost more of it than we walked, which made it extremely strenuous but totally worth it.

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Staff Spotlights: Matt Weido

Matt Weido, University Housing

Matt Weido, University Housing

Matt Weido

Residence Hall Director - University Housing

Achiever - Competition - Significance - Focus - Consistency


Matt was the 2020-2021 recipient of the New Professional of the Year award - here are some selections of what his nominators shared with us!

...While this was Matt’s first professional role in University Housing, he brought a wealth of skills, willingness to learn, passion for the work we do, and constant volunteering to help. In joining a housing team, there is always a challenge to get through the first few months with move in, new staff members, and everyone learning about their roles, residence halls, and on campus life. 2020 brought a global pandemic that shifted many of our practices, roles, and areas of responsibility for all of our departments across campus.

When he joined us, Matt embraced his role as a Residence Hall Director and did not let virtual meetings, social distancing, and anything else the pandemic through at him get in his way. He regularly set up meetings for his students and student staff to connect with him. He took tours of his buildings with facilities partners to fully understand the inner workings of his community. He reached out to different staff members throughout housing and fostered relationships to ensure he was being an active member of the team.

 

Matt’s first two months in the role were so successful that he was chosen from the residence hall directors to assist with managing the COVID call center in University Housing. Aside from answering student and parent concerns and questions related to all things COVID, Matt also worked to train his peers and colleagues about the housing process for supporting students during their quarantine/isolation periods. Matt did this while also still managing his full time role. He serves as a supervisor to a team of resident assistants, supervises a 24 hour front desk, advises a Community Council, serves on the Culture of Inclusion Committee, and was still participating in events such as Coffee and Conversations throughout the entire year. He has thrived so exceptionally in his role that I have been overwhelmed often times with pride as his supervisor.

Matt has also stepped up throughout the department to serve on various committees such as the Jim Day Housing Scholarship review team, volunteering to assist with manual reviews, and much more. Matt also takes time to engage the team outside of the office through monthly Moon Walks hosted by our Executive Director. Matt was asked this year to serve as a facilitator for the Leadership Summit. He has also assisted with piloting a mediation program that partners UGA Law School students with University Housing residents who are experiencing conflicts that require a mediation. This program provides a neutral mediator for each situation and also allows the housing staff member to serve as a support for the students.  I look forward to seeing Matt continue to grow in his role and as a staff member in the Student Affairs field for many years to come.

Additionally:

As a Residence Hall Director, Matt is pulled in multiple directions, whether it's his supervision duties, crisis response, building relationships with his students, or simply managing his daily tasks; Matt has been one to handle it all with grace, while simultaneously seeking out new opportunities for growth.

...Even within a global pandemic, Matt has committed himself to engaging with campus partners. Matt has made it his personal mission to attend as many "Coffee & Conversations" as possible to meet more of his peers across the division. He can regularly be found walking around Georgia Square Mall with Linda Kasper, Executive Director for University Housing, and peers, during Linda's monthly "moon walks." Matt's outreach efforts contributed to the Education Leadership & Service Office approaching him to volunteer as a facilitator for their 2021 Leadership Summit. Matt is also currently in conversations with the Multicultural Services & Programs office to foster a relationship between them and University Housing, to bring more inclusive programming to students. He has also volunteered to review scholarship applications for the 2021 Jim Day Housing Scholarship which will provide him with the opportunity to learn from residents’ perspectives how University Housing has positively impacted their lives at UGA. Matt actively seeks out opportunities to create relationships to best support his students, department, and peers.

This spring, Matt was able to partner with the Housing Sustainability Coordinator, Christy Tweedy, to lead a composting pilot program at his community on the Health Science Campus for the first time. To create a positive impact for his residents, Matt also piloted a "compost pledge" where he asked his residents to commit to compost during the spring semester. Matt physically showcased the pledge in the community office, which lead to greater participation. This program was highly successful, with over 45 residents signing up! So far, the Health Science Campus has composted a generous amount of waste in its first month of the program. Matt's second pilot program is in partnership with the University of Georgia's School of Law and the Office of Student Conduct, where law students are given the opportunity to practice their mediation skills with roommate conflicts within Matt's community.

I strongly believe that he is more than deserving to be recognized for going above and beyond in his role, all while exemplifying what it means to be a Georgia Bulldawg within the Division of Student Affairs. His leadership, charisma, and need to excel, has positively impacted Matt's peers, department, students, and with anyone he has worked.


Are you from Georgia? If not, where are you from? (i.e., where do you call “home”?)

Nope. Home is Sunny San Diego, CA. But I was born in Houston, TX and then moved to California when I was a year old.

How long have you worked at UGA?

Since July of last year. I just hit my one-year mark!

What does a “day in the life” look like for you at work?

Oh man, it really depends on the day. I’ll usually roll in and head straight for the Keurig – need that morning coffee. Then it’s catching up on emails and checking to see if anything occurred in my community the night before. The rest of the day can consist of meetings, checking in with students and staff, and any other commitments I may have.

What are three things you love most about your job?

  1. My residents and student staff. They make me laugh and create a fun work environment.
  2. The autonomy to lead my team in a way that fosters an environment for them to grow and challenge themselves.
  3. I also have to say my Health Sciences Campus team. We may be small, but we are mighty!

Who do you look up to/ admire?

I’ve had a few mentors through the years, but the one I feel changed my life the most was my supervisor in undergrad, Karen Winard. She was fearless, courageous, and knew how to build people up. I unfortunately lost her to cancer a few years back.

What are things that you do for fun/hobbies?

I used to be a part of a kickball and volleyball league and I hope to get back into it. Right now, my time is spent with my dog, beamer, exploring Georgia, and traveling whenever I can. I’m always ready to take a trip!

What might be something that you would like other staff to know about your job?

That Health Sciences Campus really isn’t far from main campus. We’re our own community with a gym, dining hall, library, and much more. Come on out for a tour!

What might be some ways that staff could collaborate or partner with you?

Our student staff love to learn about campus partners and how to best collaborate with them. If y’all have a program or information you’d like students to know about, we got you!

Anything you would like to share that you would like other staff to know about you?

I’m a fast-paced executor. Meaning that I’m always running around getting tasks accomplished. But please stop me and say hi!

What advice would you have for new staff joining UGA Student Affairs?

Get to know people! We are a massive division with a lot of amazing individuals who are here to support you and your goals.

What is one question you wished we asked and what is the answer?

What is my favorite color? The answer is blue, which is why I wear it so often.
OR what is my favorite place I’ve been. That answer is Venice. Getting lost around the canals is awesome.

What is the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

I’m stuck between sky diving in California and ziplining over alligators. Both were super fun and adrenaline inducing. I wouldn’t say I’m an adrenaline junky, but I do love a good thrill.

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Staff Spotlights: Mildred Anderson

Mildred Anderson, University Housing

Mildred Anderson, University Housing

Mildred Anderson

Human Resources Manager - University Housing

Achiever - Responsibility - Developer - Strategic - Arranger


 

Mildred was nominated for a Staff Spotlight by a colleage, who shared the following:

University Housing is one of the largest employers of staff in Student Affairs and within the university. With more than 250 full time, 300 student and 150 temp/intern staff Mildred Anderson, the HR Manager for University Housing, is often available, provides guidance, coaching, support and care to many staff within our department. Throughout the last year and a half, there have been many things that have had to be shifted, changed, and navigated and she has shown diligence and positivity through it all. This includes hiring, how staff show up to work, accountability, training, and onboarding - when you really take a moment to step back and think about it she's been responsible for an awful lot departmentally. I often thinks that Mildred's efforts get overlooked or taken for granted because she simply does the best that she can and keeps moving forward.


 

Are you from Georgia? If not, where are you from? (i.e., where do you call “home”?)

I was born and raised in Ghana and lived there most of my life, specifically in Kumasi. I relocated to Athens about 16 years ago. I call Athens home now, but I hope to move back to Ghana somewhere down the line.

How long have you worked at UGA?

Since January 2014.

What does a “day in the life” look like for you at work?  

My day typically starts with emails and then following up with units/employees in Housing and across campus with a sprinkling of meetings in between. On any given day, I could be consulting with supervisors and employees on employee relations issues, payroll, compensation, policy, identifying resources, etc.

What are three things you love most about your job?

  • No two working days are the same for me and that keeps things interesting and very creative and helps me grow as a person and in my job as well. The unpredictability keeps me on my toes.
  • When I am able to help a staff member with an issue that needs resolution.
  • The awesome people I get to work/cross paths with who show such professionalism and dedication.

Who do you look up to/ admire?

My mother. She has defied so many odds to be what she is today and she inspires me every day to be the best human possible.

What are things that you do for fun/hobbies? 

Reading. I do that a lot. Very much, actually. I love listening to music and discovering new artistes/music in the classic pop, new age and operatic pop genres. I don’t have a sense of rhythm so it doesn’t involve any dancing to the music. Just head bobbing and lip synching. smile

What might be something that you would like other staff to know about your job?

The Housing HR office is here to do our part in creating a position and productive workplace that enhances your work life. We’re here to help!

What might be some ways that staff could collaborate or partner with you?

Whether it is payroll, training and professional development, wellness or any workplace related issue, I am happy to facilitate opportunities for staff.

Anything you would like to share that you would like other staff to know about you?  

My door is always open. Please walk in anytime even if you aren’t sure it is HR-related. We’ll work through it together.

What advice would you have for new staff joining UGA Student Affairs?

Get to know other areas of UGA and make connections as much as you can. Take advantage of the benefits that UGA and the division has to offer to grow personally and professionally. If your work allows, say yes often to opportunities that fall outside your job duties and responsibilities.And last but not the least - make self-care a priority.

What is one question you wished we asked and what is the answer?

Probably what is my favorite type of nuts? Pecans. If you want to entice me to eat anything, put pecans on/in it.

What is the coolest thing you have ever done and why? 

I suppose most people would start out with a smoother, gentler ride, but my first ever rollercoaster ride was on the Goliath at Six Flags a couple of years ago. Why I did that? Still a mystery to me. I know though it was one of the most exhilarating, longest, and scariest 3.5 minutes of my life.

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Staff Spotlights: Gary Glasser

Dr. Gary Glasser, University Health Center

Dr. Gary Glasser, University Health Center

Gary Glasser

Physician for the Gynecology Clinic - University Health Center

Harmony - Empathy - Learner - Positivity - Developer


Dr. Glasser was nominated for a Staff Spotlight by a colleague, who shared the following:

Dr. Glasser is one of the most conscientious physicians I have known.  His level of caring and attention to detail is very apparent in not only his clinical encounters in our Gynecology Clinic, but also with colleagues at the Health Center and in social contexts.  Dr. Glasser is as affable a person as you will ever meet, and his optimism is as infectious as is his enjoyment of his work.  Voracious in his appetite to learn and contribute has chaired our Medical Staff, leads our Ethics Committee, represented the UHC and Student Affairs at the University Council, engaged with the Parent’s Leadership, volunteered during move-in day, and most recently accepted the Chair of our Quality Council.  Of course, I say this because it is true and not because of the frequency that he brings treats to the staff at work, including myself.


Are you from Georgia? If not, where are you from? (i.e., where do you call “home”?)

I am originally from Winter Park, FL, but have been in Georgia (except for medical school at a rival school that I cannot mention in this publication...) since 1980.

How long have you worked at UGA?

I started in 2014.

What does a “day in the life” look like for you at work?

I live in Atlanta, and commute [about] 2.5 hours back and forth each weekday – that tells you I love my job! My day consists mostly of direct patient care, my true passion. I see patients with gynecologic problems (e.g. relating to their menses or pain) as well as sexually-transmitted infection testing and treatment, and contraceptive management. A large percentage of my day is spent educating students about these issues, helping them make the correct choices for their health with as much information as possible. As COVID-19 progressed, we did less in-person visits but still were able to connect and treat patients by telehealth (I have to smile when patients are in a parked car on their phone for a gynecology visit – it almost looks like we have a drive-thru for the Gynecology Clinic!). Part of my day is spent in my new position as Chief Quality Officer for the University Health Center, working with committees to continually improve the student experience at the UHC. The UHC’s Quality Initiative strives to engage, challenge, and empower every employee and health care provider, using evidence-based techniques, to provide the best health care in all departments and clinics.

What are three things you love most about your job?

I only get 3?? Okay:

1) One’s job is only as good as your boss – and the leadership at the University Health Center have as their central mission to provide the best and most up-to-date medical care for our students. They have created an environment that embraces change – striving to make what we do good, great, and to make what we do great, greater. Every employee is a part of a culture at UHC that emphasizes continuous learning and everyday improvement.

2) One’s job is only as good as your co-workers – and it’s not luck that UHC hires employees that are dedicated to hard work and are engaged, innovative, and perform meaningful work.

3) One’s job is only as good (wait – do you see a trend here?) as the patients we see. And the student population here is amazing – interested in learning about their health, receptive to advice, and able to think logically and make good health choices.

Who do you look up to/ admire?

My parents. My dad (of blessed memory) always said something that still resonates with me: It’s always harder to do the right thing. He got the idea from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr’s quote, "The time is always right to do the right thing." But dad recognized that knowing what is right may not be easy, and that taking the easy way out of a problem won’t help you in the long run. I think of this almost every day – at home and at work. My mom taught me, through example, to look forward, that bad times will pass, and to think positively.

What are things that you do for fun/hobbies?

I have played tennis for 47 years, and still am trying to get the hang of it (and while I have this platform – anyone reading this want to play? I am USTA 3.5-4.0 and can play any day after work.)

What might be something that you would like other staff to know about your job?

Well, everyone who has been to a gynecologist knows this, but no one looks forward to their first gynecologic visit. And we see many students for their first visit ever to a gynecologist. Besides providing great healthcare, we also strive to make it an empowering, informative, and “well, that wasn’t so bad!” visit. We set the tone for the rest of her life’s interaction with gynecology, and we take that responsibility seriously.

What might be some ways that staff could collaborate or partner with you?

My grandmother used to say, “If you have your health, you have everything.” ((okay - she actually said “aoyb ir hot deyn gezunt, ir hot alts.” but I translated it for you since not many people still speak Yiddish). Students cannot do their best academically if they aren’t healthy, or if they are worried about their health. Students are many times on their own for the first time, and seeking gynecologic healthcare can be intimidating. All UGA staff, when they can, should promote the idea of health as a priority – and let students know we are available and here to help – for gynecologic problems but also proactive information about all reproductive and sexual issues.

What advice would you have for new staff joining UGA Student Affairs?

Two things:

1) Making the student experience better is the ultimate reason why each of us come to work each day. Knowing that helps guide all that you do.

2) You may work in one part of UGA, and never seem to interact with the rest of the UGA universe. Get involved, volunteer, do something, anything outside your work ‘bubble’ – both you and UGA will benefit.

What is one question you wished we asked and what is the answer?

(okay, time for a shameless plug)… Question: Is it true your son Gus Glasser has a new album out called “Rhythm of the Road”, available wherever you stream music including iTunes and Spotify, and that he is also trending on social media including > 740K views on TikTok? Answer: Yes, indeed (smiling as a proud parent).

What is the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

My name and “cool” have never been used in the same sentence (ask my kids). So maybe not “cool,” but something pretty amazing: Everyone who has had,or been present for, the birth of their child or grandchild knows how thrilling and miraculous that process is. Imagine my joy delivering 4,327 babies (yes I kept count) over 26 years of doing obstetrics in my former life. And imagine my surprise when two UGA students at their visit with me recently told me that I delivered them! I told them I wouldn’t recognize them unless they were swaddled in a blanket and cried…

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

SkillSurvey

The Division of Student Affairs is pioneering the use of SkillSurvey for the University of Georgia. SkillSurvey is a career readiness tool utilized to help students understand their career readiness strengths in the top competencies desired by employers.

 

Why SkillSurvey?

SkillSurvey uses a 360º review of the student’s performance in their role as a student employee or as an experiential learning activity participant. Students are provided the opportunity to self-reflect on their career readiness, while also having the opportunity to receive feedback from the student’s supervisor and their peers.

 

How does it work?

Each department chooses the dates for administering SkillSurvey to their students. Students will receive an e-mail link inviting them to take a self-evaluation of their career readiness. Additionally, the student’s supervisor and a peer (if applicable) will also receive a link to evaluate the student. After all evaluations have been completed, students will receive a summary of their career readiness report.

 

What is the benefit?

SkillSurvey will assist students in understanding their strengths and areas of growth in relation to career readiness levels. Student employees in the Division of Student Affairs will have the opportunity to review their unique data, meet with staff members, and track their career readiness progression each year.

View the NACE Career Competencies

Welcome to Annie Carlson Welch

Professional photo of Annie Carlson Welch in a magenta blazer

Annie Carlson Welch Named Assistant to the Vice President for Student Affairs

Colleagues:

We are excited to introduce Annie Carlson Welch as our new Assistant to the Vice President for Student Affairs – Learning and Improvement.

Following a national search, Annie joins us from North Carolina State University, where she served most recently as associate director in the Office of Undergraduate Research. In this role, she worked closely with students and faculty mentors across all disciplines to facilitate research opportunities, enable student skill development, and coordinate campus-wide research awards and symposia.

At UGA, Annie will lead efforts across Student Affairs on experiential learning and essential skill development for students, helping to integrate learning across the student experience. She will serve as a primary resource for faculty and academic leaders on co-curricular life and work to ensure experiences and programs throughout Student Affairs have maximum benefit to students. She will report to the vice president through the chief of staff.

Previously, Annie held leadership positions at NC State in academic advising and exploratory studies. Her accomplishments include efforts to systematically assess and align curriculum and department programs and identify predictive models and interventions to improve student success.

Annie’s earlier career experiences include roles in student engagement and fraternity and sorority life at Wake Forest University and the University of Oregon.

Annie is an experienced curriculum developer and facilitator, having created and led numerous courses and sessions on topics including research, leadership, and student advising. She is an active member of several national organizations, including the Council on Undergraduate Research, the National Academic Advisors Association, and Student Affairs Professionals in Higher Education (NASPA).

Carlson Welch holds a master’s degree in higher education from Florida State University and a bachelor’s in history and anthropology from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign.

Annie’s faculty appointment is effective March 15, 2021.

Please join us in welcoming Annie to the VP’s office and Student Affairs.

 

Victor K. Wilson, Vice President for Student Affairs
Matt Waller, Chief of Staff, Student Affairs

Staff Spotlights: Tate Student Crew

April Cifuentes

Tate Student Center, Information Desk

Zaria Palmer

Tate Student Center, Building Manager

Zarina Frausto

Tate Student Center, Information Desk


We're excited to recognize three outstanding student staff members, whose hard work and quick thinking have more than earned them the spotlight. Their supervisor, Josh Hudson, had the following to say:

The Tate Student Center Facilities & Operations staff played a critical role in the emergency-response for the fire that occurred last Fall. Our Information Desk staff members Zarina Frausto & April Cifuentes, plus our Building Manager Zaria Palmer calmly reacted to the emergency by notifying the appropriate authorities, ensuring the building was clear of people, and providing direction to first responders. Without their presence, it's likely that our facility would have suffered more significant losses. I am overjoyed that these students get to be the Staff Spotlight because they deserve to be recognized for helping preserve a place that is special to many people.

 

Let's get to know these outstanding students a little more:

Tell us a little bit about yourself! What year are you, what’s your major?

Zarina F.: My name is Zarina Frausto, and I am a 3rd year Criminal Justice and Psychology Major with a Minor in Portuguese.

Zaria P.: My name is Zaria Palmer. I am a junior double majoring in finance and information technology.

Where do you call home?

Zarina F.: I am from Woodstock, GA, but I also consider my parents’ home country, Mexico, as a place to call home.

Zaria P.: I grew up in Freeport Grand Bahama, Bahamas.

How long have you worked at the Tate Student Center?

Zarina F.: I have been working at Tate since September 2020.

Zaria P.: I’ve been working at Tate since Freshman year, so going on three years now.

Tell us a little about the work that you do at Tate – what does a typical shift look like?

Zarina F.: A shift at Tate is typically a walk around your designated floors at every 30-minute mark, but it also includes social interactions with not only other Tate employees but students as well. Students come to the Information Desk to ask questions about anything, and being prepared to answer or to look for the answer always keeps me on my toes. Also, I cannot forget about the parents and future dawgs who come tour UGA. I enjoy answering their questions about campus and possibly slipping in some restaurant suggestions in the area.

Zaria P.: As a building manager, I go on hourly rounds around Tate and Memorial to make sure patrons, students, and the building are secured. When I’m not doing my rounds, I’m at the information desk either assisting patrons who enter the building or other student staff workers.

What’s been your favorite experience at UGA so far?

Zarina F.: My favorite experience at UGA has been connecting with the Hispanic/Latino community with various events that have been held by HSA or MSP. I think my favorite so far has been “Orgullo Hispano” back in February of last year. I enjoyed meeting and networking with various Latinx staff and faculty.

Zaria P.: I’ve had the best experience at UGA so far. I’ve met so many amazing people experienced so much growth both personally and professionally. I believe I’ve learned so many things here at UGA whether it was in the classroom, at my job, or simply interacting with a stranger at the dining hall, and I am extremely grateful for those experiences.

Do you have any interests or hobbies you’d like to share with us?

Zarina F.: I enjoy writing poetry on my downtime, but most of it is done in Spanish where I am able to get whatever emotions/feelings or messages I want to get across. Something else I do enjoy is soccer whether it is watching or diving on the field as a goalkeeper. I haven’t played in a while, but it is a great way to destress.

Zaria P.: I play tennis. I’ve been playing since I was three and I’m on the club team at UGA. I really love the sport.

Who do you look up to or admire and why?

Zarina F.: I look up to my parents because they have worked nonstop since they arrived in the U.S. to provide a better life for me and my brothers. No matter what comes across their path, they take it head on and keep moving forward. They’re my motivation to keep going and not look back, and I know that everything I am doing is not only for me but for them as well to ensure them that their hard work continues to payoff.

Zaria P.: I look up to my parents. They’ve sacrificed so much to give me a comfortable life and they give me so much unconditional love and acceptance, so I really admire who they are as people.

You were one of the first people on site for the Tate fire – what went through your head?

Zarina F.: When I first saw the fire, I couldn’t believe what I was looking at. My mind was questioning if the fire was real or if it was a figment of my imagination. Once I had processed what was going, I had to run and grab my radio to let Zaria and April know what the situation was. I think it really took a lot for me to put a brave face on and act quickly in order to make sure the fire didn’t spread.

Zaria P.: My first thought was to sound the fire alarm and then alert my supervisors. Then I thought to use the fire panel to see where the fire was coming from, so I’d know where I’d have to grant the fire fighters access.

What’s one thing you’d like Student Affairs staff members to know about you, your work, or your experience here at UGA?

Zarina F.: I have enjoyed my time here at UGA so far, especially the late night homework/study sessions at the MLC with my close friends. With the pandemic, it has been difficult to carry out those study sessions, but we find the time and space while staying safe. Also, even though I am not involved on campus often, I find time to volunteer for the Athens community through a non-profit organization named HoPe Inc. (Hispanic Organization Promoting Education). The main objective of this organization is to increase the graduation rate among Hispanic high school students through leadership, education, and community service. Being highly involved with a group of high school students in Athens has impacted my experience at UGA. I have made it this far in my higher education, and I want to set an example for those in the community to continue with their education after high school.

Zaria P.: I think I’d just want everyone to know I’m a hard worker and a nice person.

What’s one question you wish we’d asked and what’s the answer?

Zarina F.: "What’s your favorite ice cream flavor?" Chocolate Chip Cookie Dough!

Zaria P.: I don’t have any questions. I think these questions paint a pretty holistic picture.

 

Unfortunately, April was unavailable at the time of publishing this month's Spotlight, but her responses will be added in as we receive them!

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Search for the Executive Director of the University Health Center

Front facade of the University Health Center at the University of Georgia

The University of Georgia is pleased to announce the national search for the position of Executive Director of the University Health Center. UGA is seeking a visionary and accomplished leader with extensive healthcare experience and the professional stature to oversee a complex and integrated healthcare operation providing medical, mental health, and counseling services; health promotion and educational outreach programs; and clinical specializes and support services to a diverse student population of approximately 40,000 students. This is an outstanding opportunity to shape the future of a comprehensive, accredited, student health center located in a beautiful campus environment in Athens, Georgia. The incoming Executive Director is expected to inspire staff and students with a strong vision for student-centered healthcare and to raise the profile of UGA's health and wellness programs and services as a national model of excellence.

For more information on the role, please see the position profile.

The University of Georgia has partnered with Keeling & Associates in this search process. Applications should include a cover letter and resume and must be sent, preferably in PDF format, to recruiting@KeelingAssociates.com. The subject line of the email should read UGA - Executive Director." Confidential inquiries and nominations should be addressed to Dr. Jan Walbert, Vice President and Senior Consultant for Executive Search, Keeling & Associates, at jwalbert@KeelingAssociates.com. Applications received by February 26, 2021, will receive full consideration. The process will continue until the position is filled.

 

Members of the Search Committee include:

  • Eric Atkinson, Associate Vice President for Student Affairs
  • Arjun Bhatt, undergraduate student, Student Health Advisory Committee 
  • ShaRonda Cooper, Director of Multicultural Services and Programs
  • Subhraleena Deka, graduate student, Graduate Student Association
  • Cindy Elmore, Registered Nurse for Medical Clinic Gold 
  • Linda Kasper, Executive Director, University Housing
  • Roswell Lawrence, Assistant Vice President and Chief of Staff, Finance and Administration
  • Lisa Nolan, Dean of the College of Veterinary Medicine 
  • Liz Prince, Director of Health Promotion and the John Fontaine, Jr. Center for Alcohol Awareness and Education, University Health Center
  • Fred Reifsteck III, Lead Physician for Medical Clinic Red and Sports Medicine; Head Team Physician for the UGA Athletic Department, University Health Center
  • Beau Seagraves, Associate Dean of Students and Director of Student Care and Outreach
  • Jennifer Swails, Director of Finance and Support Services, University Health Center
  • Tara Thurmond, Administrative Associate, University Health Center
  • Arial Treankler, Director of Clinical Services, Psychologist, Counseling and Psychiatric Services (CAPS), University Health Center
  • Misha Ul-Islam, undergraduate student, Student Government Association
  • Matthew Waller, Chief of Staff, Student Affairs (Chair)

Staff Spotlights: Charles Clark

Charles Clark

Coordinator for Event Services - Tate Student Center

Achiever – Responsibility – Consistency – Harmony – Learner


Charles was nominated for a Staff Spotlight by a coworker, who had the following to say about him:

Charles has been a team player from day one. He was originally hired as Event Coordinator in Campus Reservations, Events & Technical Services, but over the years, he has filled in and acted in many different roles. He filled in as the Senior Coordinator for Event Services for a year during a long search process for that position. He can fill in for the second Event Coordinator and supervise the student set up crew. He is cross-trained in Technical Services to support the tech team on basic sound set up and technical support. Currently, Charles is filling in for role of Senior Coordinator for Facilities in the Tate Student Center. This shows his willingness at all times to support the larger mission of the Tate Student Center and Division of Student Affairs. He is a hard worker and outstanding leader. This willingness of supportive work also shows up in his relationships with the variety of customers that CRETS interacts with on a daily basis. From student groups, department staff, or upper administration, Charles continues to put his best foot forward. I am proud to have someone as eager, willing, and supportive as Charles Clark on the CRETS team. And while he may be on a temporary assignment, Charles will continue to have a “home” in CRETS.


Are you from Georgia? If not, where are you from? (i.e., where do you call “home”?)

I was born in Atlanta, Georgia and that was home for me until I moved to Athens in 2016.

How long have you worked at UGA?

I have worked at UGA since July of 2017.

What does a “day in the life” look like for you at work?

In my role as an Event Coordinator, my day would normally start by checking my email to see if any new details have come in about the events I am coordinating. I then will check EMS to see what is on the event schedule for the day and proceed to check those spaces that have events to confirm that the set-ups are correct. Throughout the rest of day, my time will be spent working in EMS, creating diagrams, responding to emails, and checking with clients to make sure they are set for their event.

Currently, I am operating as the Interim Facilities and Operations Coordinator. My normal day in this role typically involves checking in and supervising the Information Desk Student Workers as well as conducting rounds throughout the Tate Center to make sure everything in the building looks correct and is working properly.

What are three things you love most about your job?

  • Connecting and building relationships with clients.
  • Being involved in producing Signature Events for the University and for Student Affairs.
  • The “family” environment that has been created in the CRETS office amongst my co-workers.

Who do you look up to/ admire?

I look up to my parents as both have inspired me in different ways throughout the course of my life and they continue to do so.

What are things that you do for fun/hobbies?

Being outside and going on hikes; playing/watching sports with friends and family; playing video games with friends; watching movies; reading.

What might be some ways that staff could collaborate or partner with you?

In my Event Coordinator role, staff can partner with me by submitting requests for events that would take place in the Large Event Spaces in Tate and in Memorial. They also can reach out if they ever have any specific questions about hosting an event in Tate.

What advice would you have for new staff joining UGA Student Affairs?

Embrace the “family” environment that has been established by the leadership in Student Affairs!

What is the coolest place that you have traveled to?

My answer would be Niagara Falls in Canada.

What is the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

In 2018, I was fortunate enough to be able to ride a horse in the mountains of Colorado while it was snowing. It was an amazing experience with gorgeous views that I will probably never get to do again!

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Staff Spotlights: Tanesha Hitchcock

A portrait picture of Staff Spotlight Tanesha Hitchcock

Tanesha Hitchcock

Front Desk Associate - Disability Resource Center & Student Care and Outreach

Relator - Achiever - Responsibility - Significance - Arranger


Tanesha was nominated for a Staff Spotlight by a coworker, who had the following to share:

Tanesha is the brightest light of the day in Student Care and Outreach. During our response to COVID-19, she has been unwavering in her commitment to assist in whatever way possible. No matter what the situation she is always smiling and we love having her speak the truth for us! She has such an amazing outlook, and there is no question that our service to the students is better because she is a part of our team.


Are you from Georgia? If not, where are you from? (i.e., where do you call “home”?)

Yes. I am from Hull, GA.

How long have you worked at UGA?

I have worked for the university for 5 years

What does a “day in the life” look like for you at work?

I come in and greet everyone, coffee in hand. Check my email and start working on my daily tasks from there.

What are three things you love most about your job?

  • I love being able to help students alleviate stress.
  • I love that the main goal for everyone in our office is the well-being of the students.
  • I love being able to be around people.

Who do you look up to/ admire?

Michele Obama, a woman who was tormented for over eight years for just being herself; every time they went low she aimed high and that showed me people are going to say things about you that you don’t like all your life. The principle of the matter is what you choose do to afterwards.

What are things that you do for fun/hobbies?

I’m very creative and crafty so I love doing elaborate make up looks, cooking and making tutorials.

What might be some ways that staff could collaborate or partner with you?

If you know of a student having a difficult time direct the student to our office or you can reach out to us for the student. We can help to ensure the student receives the support they need.

What advice would you have for new staff joining UGA Student Affairs?

Get to know people from each office and get to know what their office does to service students

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Join Arch Society!

Members of the 28th Class of Arch Society in front of the Arch.

Members of the 28th Class of Arch Society in front of the Arch.

Are you ready to join Arch Society?

Welcome to Arch Society's official recruitment page! We are so excited that you are interested in joining Arch Society. Each year we induct a whole new class of students and we would love for you to be apart of this amazing experience! Below we have more details about the organization, ways you can learn more, and information about our selection process. Please explore this page and if you have any questions about joining Arch Society, please contact our Vice Chair of Committees (archsocvcc@uga.edu). 

What is Arch Society?

Arch Society is a unique student organization for students in their third year or higher. Arch Society provides service to the University of Georgia as official hosts and goodwill ambassadors.

As the official hosts and goodwill ambassadors, we seek to live out our mission, to serve the University of Georgia by sharing Arch Love, by giving tours to campus visitors and new UGA community members and assisting at university events like Commencement. In all of our interactions, we share our own individual and diverse experiences of UGA, highlighting the amazing opportunities here and demonstrating the value and promise of higher education. By telling our stories, we share our passion for UGA, making our love visible through service. 

Additionally, Arch Society is a meaningful leadership experience. We attract leaders from across campus which gives members the experience of being "leaders among leaders." We receive hands-on advising from the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs, helping us to further develop as leaders and integrate our leadership experiences from across campus. Arch Society is such an impactful experience, we are established as an Experiential Learning (EL) opportunity.

And, beyond our foundations in service and leadership, we are one big family! While members come from many different UGA experiences before joining, every class of Arch Society describes the strong bonds of friendship and connection they forge with other Arch Society members through training and service. We call this Arch Love and aim to share this at every opportunity. Arch Society becomes a huge support system over the course of the year, with mentorship from returning members and alumni. And our internal committees help bring members together through social gatherings, major celebrations, and shared community service and philanthropy events aimed at a common cause.

While we've done our best to describe Arch Society here, we recommend reaching out to us so we can better convey the whole experience of Arch!

Why Join Arch Society?

Are you looking for to give back to UGA? Maybe searching for a new way to serve? Or hoping to grow beyond your current leadership experiences? Or even looking for a new group to connect to? 

Arch Society provides for all of these needs as we exercise our mission, to serve the University of Georgia by sharing Arch Love, and serve as the official hosts and goodwill ambassadors. Members from every class have described how impactful this experience has been, transforming them and elevating their time at UGA.

Recruitment & Membership Timeline

Arch Society begins our formal recruitment efforts in November each year and interviews interested students to join the organization at the beginning of the spring semester. We invite selected students to join Arch Society with a formal letter in February and induct our new members in April after several weeks of training. New Arch Society members begin serving the university at the end of the spring semester and serve until the next class is inducted in the following April.

Recruitment is currently closed. We will reopen recruitment in November 2021.

Learn More About Arch Society

  • Social Media — Please follow us on Instagram (@ugaarchsociety) and Facebook (@UGAArchSociety) to see current Arch Society experiences and learn about life in the blazer!
  • Recruitment Events:
    • Recruitment events are a great opportunity to learn more about Arch Society directly from current members. See the list below to attend an upcoming event.
    • Upcoming Events:
      • We have concluded all information sessions for the current recruitment season. Please check back in November 2021. In the meantime, if you have questions about joining Arch Society, please email archsocvcc@uga.edu!
      • Stay tuned for future recruitment events!
    • Recruitment PowerPoint: Link Here
  • Contact Us — Don't hesitate to reach out to us if you have questions about joining Arch Society! Please email our Vice Chair of Committees (archsocvcc@uga.edu). They are happy to tell you more about serving with Arch Society!

Selection Process

So you have learned more about Arch Society and decided we are the experience for you, what's next? Please see the outline below for the steps to becoming a member of Arch Society and note that bold items are required to join Arch Society.

  • Recruitment — Selection for Arch Society starts with recruitment events. We recommend (but do not require) that every prospective member attend an information session to learn more about the organization. Please see the "Learn More About Arch Society" section above to see a list of upcoming recruitment events.
  • Application — Having learned about Arch Society and wanting to join, please complete our application. The link to our application can be found below (when applications are open) with the full schedule for the current selection process. In the application, we will ask for more information about you and have you share more about your interest by completing three long-form questions (no more than 400 words). We will also confirm that you are eligible to join Arch Society:
    • You are available for all mandatory Arch Society dates (full list of dates included in application) or have received approval for exceptions from Arch Society advisors.
    • You have spent at least one full year at UGA as a student. We believe Arch Society members need to know the campus they will be representing, so we ask newer members of the UGA community (ex. transfer students, new undergraduate students, new graduate students) to log a full year at UGA.
    • As an undergraduate student, you are at least a current second-year or third-year student (by years at UGA, not credit hours) so you will be at third-year or fourth-year during the following year and the majority of your Arch Society Service. As a graduate student, there is no class year requirement, however, you must have a year of experience at UGA.
    • You have at least one full year left before graduation from UGA.
    • You are a full-time student (defined as: a. Undergraduate: 12 or more credit hours per semester b. Graduate: 9 or more credit hours per semester) or an on-campus part-time student at the Athens campus with approval from the Arch Society Executive Board and Advisors.
    • You are in good academic and disciplinary standing with your school or college, your program of study, and the University of Georgia.
  • Mandatory Candidate Session — After submitting your application, you will attend our Mandatory Candidate Session at the University Chapel in late January. (For January 2021, this will happen online due to COVID-19.) At this event, you will hear from Arch Society leadership and current members about the commitment and opportunities of Arch Society and our chief value, humble service. Attendance is required to move forward with the selection process (unless there is a serious time conflict approved by advisors).
  • Round 1 Interviews — Pending a successful application review, you will be invited to the first round of interviews. You will select an interview time and join us for a group interview with 1-3 other candidates. Outgoing members of Arch Society and Arch Society alumni will interview prospective members.
  • Round 2 Interviews — The top sixty candidates will move on to the second round of interviews. Candidates will interview individually with the Arch Society Selection Committee, a group of campus administrators and outgoing Arch Society members who select the incoming class of members.
  • Decision Acceptance — The Arch Society Selection Committee will select a new class of members from the top candidates and eligible returning candidates. Candidates will be informed of the committee's decisions following the end of the second round of interviews via a formal letter. Candidates invited to join Arch Society must reply to the committee's invitation by the specified deadline with an acceptance letter to the Vice President for Student Affairs.
  • Training — Candidates who have accepted their invitation will attend training meetings throughout the spring semester (February through April) each Thursday night from 7:30 PM to 9:00 PM. Training meetings are required. If you foresee a conflict due to class or some other circumstance, please discuss this with the advisors.
  • Uniform — Selected candidates will work with the advisors to acquire the necessary pieces of the Arch Society uniform. The uniform is required and typically members pay about $100 toward the total cost of their uniform. However, finances are not to be a barrier to membership. Students who have concerns about this cost should reach out to advisors as they can recommend resources to help pay for the uniform.
  • Induction — After completing training, the new class will be inducted at the end of April as official Arch Society Members.

Full details of the selection process are listed in the Arch Society Constitution and Bylaws, available here and on the Involvement Network platform.

Arch Society 2021 Selection Information (Process Has Concluded, New Dates Available Nov 2021)

  • Application Information:
    • Link: https://bit.ly/3jXCYqB
    • Opens: Wed, Nov 11th 2020
    • Closes: Mon, Jan 18th 2021 (Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day)
  • Mandatory Candidate Session:
    • Date: Thu, Jan 21st 2021
    • Time: 6:30 PM or 7:15 PM
    • Location: University Chapel*
    • Session Signup Link: Coming Soon
  • Round 1 Interviews: 
    • Date: Sun, Jan 24th 2021
    • Candidates will sign up for one 30-min group timeslot during the application process
    • Time Range: Timeslots starting at 10:00 AM and extending until 5:00 PM (last timeslot will begin at 4:30 PM)
    • Location: Zoom (link on signup form)
  • Round 2 Interviews:
    • Dates: Tue, Feb 2nd 2021 and Wed, Feb 3rd 2021
    • Invited candidates will receive a link to sign up for an individual interview
    • Time Range: Timeslots starting at 1:00 PM and extending until 5:00 PM
    • Location: Coming Soon (In-person)*
  • Decisions:
    • Date: Fri, Feb 5th 2021
    • All decision letters will be available in the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs suite (306 Memorial Hall, 101 Sanford Drive).
    • Letters will be available from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM. Candidates must pick up their letters during this time unless they have made alternate arrangements with advisors.
    • Letters cannot be opened in the office suite and should be opened outside of Memorial Hall. We understand this can be an exciting time and we want to be respectful of our office neighbors.
    • All candidates responding to an invitation to membership must submit a letter to the Vice President for Student Affairs by 12:00 PM on Mon, Feb 8th.
  • Training:
    • All accepted candidates must attend training meetings.
    • First Meeting: Thu, Feb 11th
    • Time: 7:30 PM - 9:00 PM
    • Location: Coming Soon (Most sessions on Zoom, a few in-person)*

*We are making adjustments to our traditional selection process in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Our first goal is to maintain everyone's safety and protect their health. We will follow all UGA, state, and other relevant COVID-19 protocols. If you are uncomfortable meeting in person as part of the selection process, please email the Arch Society advisors as soon as possible (archsociety@uga.edu).

Arch Society

The Arch Society provides service to the University of Georgia as official hosts and goodwill ambassadors. The People of the Arch seek to serve the University of Georgia at all functions where it is desired to have students welcome guests and visitors to the University of Georgia.

Request the Arch Society

Arch Society Members

Arch Society Awards

Arch Society

Request The Arch Society

The University of Georgia holds the health and safety of our guests, students, and staff as the highest priority. In response to COVID-19, we are adapting our assignment procedures to comply with all relevant policies and the evolving situation. For the university's latest updates, please visit the UGA COVID-19 page. For questions about the Arch Society's response and availability, please email archsociety@uga.edu.

 

Contact Information

706-542-3564
archsociety@uga.edu

VP Victor K. Wilson, Faculty Advisor
askstudentaffairs@uga.edu

Emily Little, Graduate Advisor
archsociety@uga.edu

 

Arch Society Executive Board

Abiseniya Lemma, Chair
archsocchr@uga.edu

Wyatt Palmer, Vice Chair of Assignments
archsocvca@uga.edu

Connor Bowler, Vice Chair of Committees
archsocvcc@uga.edu

Suvitha Viswanathan, Vice Chair of Operations
archsocvco@uga.edu

Student Affairs Graduate Assistantships Frequently Asked Questions

This page includes Frequently Asked Questions from potential candidates looking for more information about graduate assistantships for Student Affairs and partner departments at the University of Georgia.

 

When do applications open and close?

  • Applications open December 2, 2021 and close January 10, 2022. To view the timeline for applications and the selection process, click here.

What information is asked for in the assistantship application?

  • Your contact information, a resume, cover letter, and three references are to be included in your application.

Do the rankings in the application matter?

  • The rankings in the application exist for providers with multiple assistantships to know if there is a specific assistantship you prefer most. Additionally, There is an option to rank them AND to select that you want to be considered for all assistantships available.

Is there a limit on how many assistantships I can apply for?

  • No! You can indicate interest in as many or as few assistantships as you would like.

Do I need to write a cover letter for each assistantship I'm interested in?

  • You only need to write one generalized cover letter for your application.

What if a department I would like to work in does not have an assistantship listed?

  • Available assistantships differ each year. While some departments might not have assistantships available, we recommend you reach out to estbalish a connection with them so you can volunteer or potentially hold a practicum in their office.
  • If you are interested in a graduate assistantship in Recreational Sports, please visit their website for more information on availability and their application process.

What about applying to other assistantships on campus?

  • This particular process is reserved for assistantships in Student Affairs and partner departments. If you're interested in assistantships in other areas across campus, we recommend reaching out to them directly to see what they have available.

Do I need to be in a student affairs focused program to hold an assistantship?

  • No, there is no requirement to be in a student affairs focused program to be considered for an assistantship. We employ graduate assistants from a wide-variety of programs throughout UGA.

Will interviews or the Graduate Assistant Campus Day be in person or online?

  • Both interviews and Campus Day programming will take place online this year.

What all is included in an assistantship stipend?

  • Each stipend may include different requirements and compensation; we recommend viewing the position descriptions or contacting the employer directly.

If offered an assistantship position, when do we need to make a decision by?

  • The national deadline is April 15, 2022. If you are not interested in a position or intend to attend a different institution, it is recommended you let the assistantship provider know as soon as possible so they can begin contacting other candidates.

I applied but haven't heard back from any departments. When should I reach out?

  • Department's will receive candidate information as applications are open. Each department is different in when they begin scheduling interviews with candidates. Some might schedule on a rolling basis while other's might wait until after the deadline to apply has passed. 
  • If you have not received an invitation to schedule an interview and it as passed the deadline for interviews to be scheduled, please contact us at gradapps@uga.edu. 

 

 

Don't see your questions answered? Contact us at gradapps@uga.edu

Staff Spotlights: Rosendo Alvarezarmenta

Profile picture of Alvie, the October 2020 Staff Spotlight.

Rosendo Alvarezarmenta

University Housing - IT Senior Manager
Context - Responsibility - Learner - Arranger - Belief


Alvie was nominated by a colleague, who said the following:

Alvie always brings a can-do attitude to work that inspires those around him. I really appreciate how hard he has worked to support his staff during all the uncertainty the last few months have brought; his positive, innovative approach when it comes to ways to improve both himself and the work of the IT office in Housing is genuinely inspiring. Alvie excels at building relationships and collaborating across the university to better support both staff and students. Plus he's a great person that the rest of UGA should get a chance to meet!

 


Are you from Georgia? If not, where are you from? (i.e., where do you call “home”?)

I was born in Los Mochis, in northwestern Mexico and lived there most of the time until the age of 14. I then migrated to Tucson Arizona, where I attended High School and now call home. I have plans to someday, in a not so distant future to retire in Mexico where the cost of living and weather is good.

 

How long have you worked at UGA?

I started my employment at UGA on April 2011, tax day to be precise.

 

What does a “day in the life” look like for you at work?

My day starts in a very similar way most days. Typically, I start by checking my email for various process status notifications, review Trello boards, process status, backup status, and other daily tasks for which either the staff I supervise are responsible, or I’m directly responsible for. After checking these items, I document their status on the monthly spreadsheet and Trello board. After that, I work on items on Trello board to accomplish the high priority tasks. The day changes as tasks need to be accomplished, sometimes it takes me out of the office which I enjoy very much.

 

What are three things you love most about your job?

Working with professionals that care so much for others and going beyond expectations to help each other meet their respective goals. The climate is ideal for doing your best every day. I love and enjoy what I do; I come to the office with a positive attitude and belief that everything is possible.

 

Who do you look up to/ admire?

I have two persons I admire most, one for my professional life and another for my personal life. In my professional life, I admire Carla Dennis. She has been like my true north, providing professional guidance and being an excellent listener when needed. In my personal life, I have always admired my grandfather since I can remember. He is no longer with us today to continue to provide me that light we all need to guide us, but I believe he gave me a foundation to continue my journey on my own. Although he did not have a formal education or a prominent position in the community, he gained respect for his convictions. That is what I admire most [about] him.

 

What are things that you do for fun/hobbies?

I cannot think of any specific hobby, but I do several short-term hobbies. Things that enjoy now, but know very well that I will not do for a long time. When the weather is good, I enjoy playing board or card games with my spouse, which she wins most of the time. I also enjoy mowing the grass, it gives me time to think clearly and uninterrupted when I need to. Lately, I am enjoying painting a room in the house or fixing something in the house that may not necessarily need fixing. I enjoy the fixing or the improvements made.

 

What might be something that you would like other staff to know about your job?

Remember that I am here and the IT team is here to provide assistance with Information Technology needs. The IT team is strong in anticipating end user needs, but still need to hear from end users. We much rather work from a proactive stance than a reactive one. Give us the opportunity to assist you.

 

What might be some ways that staff could collaborate or partner with you?

Contact me or any member of the IT team, we want to collaborate with others in implementing solutions that will help us all improve every day. Just make sure you have an idea of what the goal is. Together we can fill in the blanks.

 

Anything you would like to share that you would like other staff to know about you?

Ask me and I will tell you, I am not complicated.

 

What advice would you have for new staff joining UGA Student Affairs?

Some of us may join the team for a different reason, do not lose sight of that reason. Do not be complacent, be happy, love what you do, provide value to the organization, and accomplish your personal and professional goals. It is an excellent place to work and grow, you are on the driver’s seat as to what you want to accomplish with the opportunity.

 

What is the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

Some years ago, I enjoyed running much more than I do now. I participated, four times, on a relay run around the island of Oahu, Hawaii. The team [was] comprised of seven runners and two drivers. Each runner would take their turn running and the rest of the team would ride the two vehicles until their turn came up. On average, each runner ran between 19-20 miles by running five relays throughout the event. The relays for each runner were not consecutive and there was plenty of rest waiting for the next turn. The lack of sleep and the frequent start and stop takes a toll on your body that becomes evident towards the end of the event. The last relay for each runner was the shortest and the most challenging to complete. Running the Oahu Perimeter run was a cool experience for me. It was cool because of the experience you shared with your teammates.

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Sarah Kesler

Sarah Kesler

Senior Administrative Manager - Disability Resource Center and University Testing Services

Achiever - Input - Empathy - Context - Harmony


 

Sarah was nominated by a colleague, who had the following to say:

Sarah brings warmth, creativity, and professionalism in her role as the Senior Administrative Manager. She is the first to volunteer to roll up her sleeves and pitch in to support the departments, division, and the University. Sarah leads by example and is pragmatic and solution driven. She is also the most organized human being I have ever met.


 

Are you from Georgia? If not, where are you from? (i.e., where do you call “home”?)

I’m an Athens native and have always lived in this area.

 

How long have you worked at UGA?

I’ve worked in the DRC and UTS for 12 years and another UGA position for 8, so a total of 20 years.

 

What does a “day in the life” look like for you at work?

My main focus is most often working with the budgets and HR procedures for DRC and UTS, so there are a lot of spreadsheets involved [smiley face]. My job also involves helping the leadership in my departments keep things running smoothly. That can mean helping design processes to handle things we need to do, working with FMD, researching UGA policy, or just general troubleshooting. There can be a lot of variety, which I enjoy.

 

What are three things you love most about your job?

I like that it gives me an opportunity to do the kind of work I’m good at, which is focused on numbers and policy, in an environment that’s very people oriented. There’s also an element of problem solving in my job that I really enjoy; I like finding creative solutions to problems. Finally, I really enjoy the people I work with. In both DRC and UTS, I get to work with people who really care about what they do and how it helps others.

 

Who do you look up to/ admire?

I’ve been lucky in both of my positions at UGA to have supervisors who balanced the needs of the office with kindness and support for me as an individual. I’ve learned a great deal from their examples and look up to all of them.

 

What are things that you do for fun/hobbies?

One of my favorite pastimes is genealogy. I’ve been researching my ancestors for about ten years and have traced some lines back as far as the 1600’s. I also enjoy crafting. I make jewelry, crochet, and sew among other things.

 

What might be something that you would like other staff to know about your job?

I’d like staff to know that my job is varied. I work with budget and HR functions most often, but I’m available to help with many other areas.

 

What might be some ways that staff could collaborate or partner with you?

I volunteered as a trainer during the launch of the UGA Financials and OneUSG Connect systems a few years ago, so I’m pretty comfortable with both of those. I’d be happy to help anyone new to them or having problems using them.

 

Anything you would like to share that you would like other staff to know about you?

I love reading and music. I’m always looking for recommendations for new things to read or listen to.

 

What advice would you have for new staff joining UGA Student Affairs?

My advice is to treat yourself with the same kindness and understanding that you extend to others. Don’t expect yourself to be perfect right away; do your best and be gentle with yourself.

 

What is one question you wished we asked and what is the answer?

I love talking about my pets, so I wish you’d asked about them. I have a dog named Ace the Bathound and two large tortoises named Torterra and A’tuin.

 

What is the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

I once went swimming with sharks! I was inside a cage, and it was so scary climbing down into it. But once I was there, seeing these amazing animals swimming all around and below me, I forgot to be scared because it was so incredible.

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Staff Spotlights: Brian Williams

Brian Williams

Brian Williams

Senior Associate Director for Facilities - Recreational Sports

Positivity - Developer - Achiever - Context - Restorative


Brian was nominated by a colleague through our Staff Recognition form, who had the following to say:

Brian has always been a great supervisor and colleague, but his leadership during these past couple of months has been fantastic. Brian truly respects those on his team and values their input. He expresses his gratitude towards us and tells us often how much he values the work we do. That may seem like a small thing, but it has such a large impact on those he works with. Brian knows the importance of getting to know those he supervises so that he can supervise them in ways that work best for them. He pushes us to be the best versions of ourselves professionally and personally. He understands that we are people first and that we have lives outside of work. Brian has been flexible and encouraging during these past couple of months and it has made the work from home transition so much easier. He provides us with the information and guidance that we need to be successful. In addition to all this, Brian is also a dad, husband, and is pursuing his doctorate. I don't know how he manages to balance everything, but he does extremely well. I'm so thankful to be a part of his team and our department is truly lucky to have him!


 

Are you from Georgia? If not, where are you from? (i.e., where do you call “home”?)

My hometown is Alexandria, Louisiana.

 

How long have you worked at UGA?

I have been a proud member of the Bulldog Family for over 14 years. I started in 2006 as the Graduate Assistant for Strength and Conditioning in the Department of Recreational Sports.

 

What does a “day in the life” look like for you at work?

No two days are the same. I do my best spreading my time between supporting my staff (Team Greatness), interacting with students, as well as leading and coordinating facility projects and events.

 

What are three things you love most about your job?

I have a tremendous amount of respect and appreciation for the people I get to work with. I also love that my job affords me the opportunity to collaborate with students, faculty, and staff in different capacities. Lastly, I love that I get to lead facility projects that have reshaped and improved the quality of our programs and facilities. 

 

Who do you look up to/ admire?

I admire my beautiful wife. She has inspired and motivated me through her strength, work ethic, intelligence, and passion for life. She is really an incredible woman! 

 

What are things that you do for fun/hobbies?

I love living an active lifestyle, playing basketball, boxing, and traveling. I also like to try new things whether it be eating different cuisines, taking in a Broadway Show at the Fox, or doing TikTok dances with my kids. 

 

What might be something that you would like other staff to know about your job?

I would like for my colleagues to know that my job is multifaceted and that the work my department does is designed to improve the quality of life for our students and patrons.

 

What might be some ways that staff could collaborate or partner with you?

Since I work in facilities, there are a lot of opportunities to collaborate with our department in hosting events and programs.

 

Anything you would like to share that you would like other staff to know about you?

I am currently pursuing an EdD in Learning, Leadership, and Organization Development at UGA.

 

What advice would you have for new staff joining UGA Student Affairs?

Find your purpose and become engaged with others within the Division. Enjoy your journey and don’t sweat the small stuff.

 

What is one question you wished we asked and what is the answer?

What is something you would like to learn? I would like to learn how to play musical instruments such as the guitar, piano, or saxophone. I also wish I was an artist – so far the closest I have gotten is designing and renovating facilities.

 

What is the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

Visiting Hawaii and getting the chance to go surfing and snorkeling.  

 


 

As a bonus, Brian was featured in UGAToday in 2018, and his feature can be read here.

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Arch Society - Awards

Members of the 28th Class of Arch Society in front of the Arch.

Members of the 28th Class of Arch Society in front of the Arch.

Fred Brown Memorial Award

It was once said of Fred Brown who lived from 1943-1992 that "He inspired student leadership at The University of Georgia."

At each year's Induction ceremony, an Arch member is chosen by his or her peers to receive the Fred Brown Award.

Fred Brown was a creative and energetic educator who set a standard for excellence in student programming and leadership development that endures at the University of Georgia today. 

Following graduation from The University of Georgia in 1967 with a bachelor's degree in fine arts, Fred taught in Athens public schools before he joined the Department of Student Activities as a graphic artist and program advisor. In 1976, he was named Assistant Director of Student Activities, and served in that capacity until 1979 when he returned to Taylor County to establish a successful regional arts and crafts festival.


It was during Fred Brown's association with the UGA campus in the late sixties and throughout the seventies that he profoundly influenced the lives of student leaders, creating energy in student life that will never be forgotten by those who came in contact with him. Working within the confines of the aging Memorial Hall (before the Tate Student Center was built), Fred used his fertile imagination and devoted personal efforts to engineer special events, innovative programs and exciting activities of a quality and scale that resulted in active involvement by a student body that was rapidly increasing in numbers at that time.

His abilities benefitted numerous campus organizations and clubs, including the golden Key Honor Society chapter which he established on campus in 1978.

Even after Fred's departure from campus, during the years spent working on his arts festival, he continued to stay involved with the University, supporting its alumni programs and maintaining contact with former students he had advised. His last years were characterized by poor health due to a heart condition, but Fred's spirit and love of life remained undiminished to the day of his death on August 31, 1992.

The University's Arch Society was in its infancy when Fred Brown's life ended. But the leadership ability and public service qualities espoused by Arch Society members today embody those traits that Fred admired and encouraged in his student affairs career at UGA. The Fred Brown Award, given to an Arch Society member for outstanding contributions to the campus, is a fitting personal tribute to an individual who loved the University and who worked tirelessly to inspire leadership among its student body.

Recipients
Nia Freeman (2019-2020)
Seonghyun Cho (2018-2019)
Linda Tejada (2017-2018)
Juhi Varshney (2016-2017)
Bert Thompson (2015-2016)
Kristen Lemaster (2014-2015)
Lesley Rios (2013-2014)
Marshall Mosher (2012-2013)
Juliette Collins (2011-2012)
Will Ginn (2010-2011)
Allie Chambers (2009-2010)
Beau Gilmore (2008-2009)
William Draper (2007-2008)
Mehual Shah (2006-2007)
Matthew Wilson (2005-2006) 
Kenneth L. Johnson (2004-2005)
Keane Johnson (2003-2004)
Corey Dortch (2002-2003)
Laura Pearson (2001-2002)
Deb Allen (2000-2001)
Renita Jain (1999-2000)
Melanie Davis (1998-1999)
Charlie Bethel (1997-1998)
Sarah Carr (1996-1997)
Rob Teilhet (1995-1996)
Kim Wuenker (1994-1995) 

 



Tom Cochran Service Award

"Arch Society provides its members with an opportunity to meet people they might not have otherwise met, go places they might not have otherwise gone, and see this University from a perspective they might not have otherwise had." - Mr. Tom Cochran

The Tom Cochran Service Award is given to the Arch Society member who spends the most hours serving the University. The award was created in the spirit of the founder, Mr. Tom Cochran, who dedicated 28 years to the University and to the students he loves. His passion inspires students in their efforts to blaze new trails and leave their legacy on campus.

Mr. Cochran earned his undergraduate degree from the University of Georgia in Philosophy and Religion and received his Theology Degree from Emory University.

He began working for UGA in 1974 as a Student Activities Accountant and later moved to the Vice President's Office. Mr. Cochran and his wife, Frances, have been married for nearly 35 years and have two children and one grandchild. Mr. Cochran retired from the University of Georgia on November 22, 2002. Arch Society will continue to serve the University with humility and dedication made famous by Mr. Cochran to further continue his legacy.

Recipients
Armando Roche (2019-2020)
Keegan Householder (2018-2019)
Isabel Carvallo (2017-2018)
Gio Navarro (2016-2017)
Sena Ahiayibor (2015-2016)
Kegan Antone (2014-2015)
Christen Baskerville (2013-2014)
Silki Modi (2012-2013)
Jonathan Trebble-Greening (2011-2012)
Alan Goodno (2010-2011)
Eddie Lovett, Jr. (2010-2011)
Alan Goodno (2009-2010)
Shruit Suresh (2009-2010)
Victoria Lee (2008-2009)
Mason McFalls (2008-2009)
Kevin Killips (2007-2008)
Kathryn Otorsina (2006-2007)
Mycla Palmer (2005-2006) 
Keauna Gregory (2004-2005)
Linton Mann (2003-2004)
Keane Johnson (2002-2003)
Paula Acree (2001-2002)
Laura Pearson (2000-2001)
Kyle Wingfienld (1999-2000)
Heather Nelson (1998-1999)
Peyton Dumleton (1998-1999)

Arch Society

The Arch Society provides service to the University of Georgia as official hosts and goodwill ambassadors. The People of the Arch seek to serve the University of Georgia at all functions where it is desired to have students welcome guests and visitors to the University of Georgia.

Request the Arch Society

Arch Society Members

Join Arch Society!

Interested in giving back to UGA? Learn more about joining Arch Society here!

Arch Society

Request The Arch Society

The University of Georgia holds the health and safety of our guests, students, and staff as the highest priority. In response to COVID-19, we are adapting our assignment procedures to comply with all relevant policies and the evolving situation. For the university's latest updates, please visit the UGA COVID-19 page. For questions about the Arch Society's response and availability, please email archsociety@uga.edu.

 

Contact Information

706-542-3564
archsociety@uga.edu

VP Victor K. Wilson, Faculty Advisor
askstudentaffairs@uga.edu

Emily Little, Graduate Advisor
archsociety@uga.edu

 

Arch Society Executive Board

Abiseniya Lemma, Chair
archsocchr@uga.edu

Wyatt Palmer, Vice Chair of Assignments
archsocvca@uga.edu

Connor Bowler, Vice Chair of Committees
archsocvcc@uga.edu

Suvitha Viswanathan, Vice Chair of Operations
archsocvco@uga.edu

Request Arch Society Service

  • - -
  • Event Information

  • / / Pick a date.
  • : :
  • : :
  • : :
  • : :
  • - -
  • North Campus Walking Tour

    The walking tour highlights Historic north campus. Some sights include but are not limited to the following: the Arch, the Chapel Bell, Herty Field, the Law School, the library, the Miller Learning Center, the Tate Student Center, and Sanford Stadium.

    *Please Note: If you are more than 20 minutes late for your tour, The Arch Society has the right to cancel or adjust the tour to accommodate the original time frame. Our students are often scheduling tours around classes and we want to ensure their education is their first priority.

    For information about Dining options on campus, Please contact UGA Food Services. There are four campus dining halls, as well as several retail locations available for your group. More information can be found at foodservice.uga.edu.

    For information about an Admissions Information Session, please contact admissions directly at (706) 542-8776.
  • Are you interested in a North Campus Walking Tour?

Arch Society Members

Arch Society Awards

Arch Society

Request The Arch Society

The University of Georgia holds the health and safety of our guests, students, and staff as the highest priority. In response to COVID-19, we are adapting our assignment procedures to comply with all relevant policies and the evolving situation. For the university's latest updates, please visit the UGA COVID-19 page. For questions about the Arch Society's response and availability, please email archsociety@uga.edu.

 

Contact Information

706-542-3564
archsociety@uga.edu

VP Victor K. Wilson, Faculty Advisor
askstudentaffairs@uga.edu

Emily Little, Graduate Advisor
archsociety@uga.edu

 

Arch Society Executive Board

Abiseniya Lemma, Chair
archsocchr@uga.edu

Wyatt Palmer, Vice Chair of Assignments
archsocvca@uga.edu

Connor Bowler, Vice Chair of Committees
archsocvcc@uga.edu

Suvitha Viswanathan, Vice Chair of Operations
archsocvco@uga.edu

Arch Society

The 2019 - 2020 Arch Society members posing in front of the UGA arch.

What is the Arch Society?

Arch Society is a unique student organization for students in their third year or higher. Arch Society provides service to the University of Georgia as official hosts and goodwill ambassadors.

The People of the Arch (POTA) seek to serve the University of Georgia at all functions where it is desired to have students welcome guests and visitors to the University of Georgia. Arch Society seeks to advance the University of Georgia through service to the offices of the President, the Provost, the Vice President for Student Affairs, the Senior Vice President for External Affairs, Alumni Relations, the Athletic Association, and other University offices or officials at appropriate functions.

Arch Society is named after the most prominent symbol of the University, the Arch. In 1857, an iron fence was erected along the northern borders of the campus. The Arch, located on Broad Street at College Avenue, became the main entrance and was modeled after the Great Seal of the State of Georgia with three pillars representing wisdom, justice, and moderation. Over the years the Arch has come to be one of the most recognizable symbols of the University of Georgia.

Important Notes for Requesting Arch Society

In order to help ensure that your request will be filled, please request Arch Society at least two weeks prior to your visit. If your visit is less than two weeks away, we encourage you to still fill out the Request Form and we will do our absolute best to fulfill your request. Requests for future semesters will be dependant on members' class schedules, so those requests may be filled closer to the end of the current semester once the members have a better sense of their personal availability. If you have any questions about anything regarding your visit, please contact our Vice Chair for Assignments at archsocvca@uga.edu. You will receive a response within 48 hours.

As the official hosts and goodwill ambassadors of the University of Georgia, Arch Society is eager to serve in roles including but not limited to:

  • Giving campus tours
  • Welcoming and directing guests
  • Facilitating registration for events
  • Distributing program materials
  • Representing the university in other appropriate capacities

As you request assistance from Arch Society, please be mindful of adhering to the start/end times of your request as well as what may or may not be appropriate tasks for Arch Society members.

As a reminder, Arch Society cannot:

  • Handle cash/checks
  • Serve food/drinks
  • Set up/tear down for events

Thank you!

Please contact us at archsociety@uga.edu with any questions.

More Information About Arch Society:

What to learn more about Arch Society? You can find more information about us on our "Join Arch Society!" page including our mission, who we are, why you might want to join, and how to join Arch Society. We also have information on UGA's Involvement Network. Any of these platforms are a great way to learn more about our organization. We also encourage you to check out our social media! We are @UGAArchSociety on Instagram and Facebook. Additionally, you can email archsociety@uga.edu to connect with our advisors and current Arch Society members.

Request the Arch Society

Arch Society Members

Join Arch Society!

Interested in giving back to UGA? Learn more about joining Arch Society here!

Arch Society Awards

Arch Society

Request The Arch Society

The University of Georgia holds the health and safety of our guests, students, and staff as the highest priority. In response to COVID-19, we are adapting our assignment procedures to comply with all relevant policies and the evolving situation. For the university's latest updates, please visit the UGA COVID-19 page. For questions about the Arch Society's response and availability, please email archsociety@uga.edu.

 

Contact Information

706-542-3564
archsociety@uga.edu

VP Victor K. Wilson, Faculty Advisor
askstudentaffairs@uga.edu

Emily Little, Graduate Advisor
archsociety@uga.edu

 

Arch Society Executive Board

Abiseniya Lemma, Chair
archsocchr@uga.edu

Wyatt Palmer, Vice Chair of Assignments
archsocvca@uga.edu

Connor Bowler, Vice Chair of Committees
archsocvcc@uga.edu

Suvitha Viswanathan, Vice Chair of Operations
archsocvco@uga.edu

Request an Update to a Website

NOTE: This form is only available to UGA Faculty and Staff who are logged into their UGA Office 360 account. Please login to your UGA email account in a separate tab BEFORE attempting to fill out this form.

Creating Events on
the Involvement Network

Creating Involvement Network Events

This video provides information and step by step instructions on creating events in UGA's Involvement Network. For more information or if you have questions please contact the department of Engagement Leadership and Service at ugaels@uga.edu or (706) 542-3816.

Tools and Resources for Facilitating Learning

Writing Student Learning Outcomes

Bloom’s Taxonomy for Writing Learning Outcomes

Center for Teaching & Learning Workshops

Learner-Centered Approach to the Co-Curriculum

How to Facilitate Learning

Active Learning Techniques

Staff Spotlights: The Tate Facilities Team

Greg Albanese

Associate Director of the Tate Student Center for Facilities and Operations

Discipline – Consistency – Analytical – Deliberative – Relator

Travis Brown

Senior Coordinator of Facilities and Operations

Achiever – Context – Deliberative – Relator – Futuristic

Whitney Cain

Assistant Director for Tate Facilities and Operations

Maximizer – Communication – Competition – Developer – Input

Joshua Hudson

Facilities and Operations Specialist

Strategic – Connectedness – Developer – Achiever – Arranger


The Tate Facilities Team was nominated by a colleague, who had the following to say:

If possible, I would love to take a moment to nominate our entire Tate Student Center Facilities Team. Tate Student Center Facilities Team consists of Greg Albanese (Associate Director), Whitney Cain (Assistant Director), Travis Brown (Senior Coordinator), and Joshua Hudson (Specialist) and these humans are incredible! In a time of such unprecedented challenges, they have amazed me with their ability to work as such a cohesive unit all in an effort to ensure students, staff, and visitors are safe during a pandemic.

 

The list continues to grow, but they have helped coordinate getting new department spaces online, moving furniture to ensure spaces meet guidelines, addressing signage concerns, and so much more. They are incredible campus partners that work to make sure our spaces are ready to go for all of our students, staff, and visitors for whatever the next day or even month brings. I am incredibly proud to work with folks like this and appreciate that, in a time of uncertainty, at least one thing is for certain: these people are amazing!


 

Are you from Georgia? If not, where are you from? (i.e., where do you call “home”?)

 

Greg: I am from Georgia. Grew up in Elberton.

Travis: I’m from Woodbine, GA (I’m sure you have not heard of it).

Whitney: I’m from a small town in South Carolina called Swansea. I named my basset hound after my hometown – she’s loud and a little rough around the edges. Bless her heart.

Josh: I am from Chatsworth, GA, which is a small, rural town in the northwest Georgia mountains, near Dalton.

 

 

How long have you worked at UGA?

Greg: I started working in Tate when I was an undergrad student in 1995. I started working full-time in 1998.

Travis: I’ve worked for UGA almost 4 years.

Whitney: I have been with UGA for a little over four years now. Time flies when you’re having fun.

Josh: I started full-time almost a year ago, but worked part-time for Rec Sports for around four years while I completed my undergraduate degree.

 

 

What does a “day in the life” look like for you at work?

Greg: It usually doesn’t go as planned. I can come into work wanting to accomplish certain things. Other issues will come up that take up most of my day.

Travis: Ensuring safety of building and visitors are taken care of. Also putting out various “fires.”

Whitney: A good portion can be spent reacting to the problems of the day, talk about a laundry list. These days keep me on my toes and they are never repetitive.   

Josh: My normal work hours of 2-11 p.m. differ from the other members of my department to provide support to the Tate Student Center and Memorial Hall during the evening and night hours. I supervise a student staff of building managers who oversee Tate and Memorial in the afternoon, night, and weekend hours. We are the main “problem-solvers” for facility-related issues and leaders during emergency situations.

 

 

What are three things you love most about your job?

Greg: The people I work with. Hands on nature of the work we do. Getting to work with all the different departments in our facilities.

Travis: The students, the atmosphere, [and] the visitors.

Whitney: I work with wonderful folks. We supervise and learn alongside amazing students. I am often humbled by the impact these buildings have on the student experience.

Josh: I love the opportunity to be a hands-on mentor to a small student staff. I love being able to have positive, supportive relationships with my coworkers. I love having supervisors who encourage growth and allow for independence.

 

 

Who do you look up to/ admire?

Greg: I have an uncle that lives up North. He’s 92. Still travels all over the US and occasionally overseas. I always enjoy talking to him. He always gives me good advice about life. Last year he bought a brand new car because he plans to keep driving for many more years.

Travis: My mother.

Whitney: I’m fortunate to say that that list would be very long. Lucky me.

Josh: I focus on admiring specific aspects of people because no one infallible. I’m fortunate to have had good parents and to have developed a strong network of mentors in the Athens/UGA community, who I look up to in different ways.

 

 

What are things that you do for fun/hobbies?

Greg: Work on or restore older cars. Build car motors.

Travis: A little reading and working on my programming skills.

Whitney: I spend a lot of time with plants. During quarantine, my home office was set up on our patio, I find a lot of comfort in moments outside. I’ve recently taken up golf, I was told, “if you play bad, play fast.” I play fast, but I’m having fun with it.

Josh: For fun, I enjoy hiking, gaming, music, politics, Netflix, traveling, and food.

 

 

Do you have a favorite location or spot on campus or in Athens? Where is it? Tell us about why you like that spot the most!

Greg: I’ve always enjoyed going to the mall. I have very early memories of going there with my family. I would always stick with my grandfather because he would buy me lots of candy. We’ve taken my oldest son there a lot. He likes to ride the train and motorized animals. He also likes to eat pretzels and jump in the bouncy houses. It saddens me to see the mall decline.

Travis: Tate, because this is the hub of campus.

Whitney: The Trial Gardens are such a vibrant and creative space. Be on the lookout for the annual Plantapalooza where UGA host a three stop plant sale on a Saturday morning in April. Pro-tip, always make the Trial Gardens your first start of that day.

Josh: I worked for UGA football and was able to be on the Sanford Stadium sidelines for a few games. The first game-day, I had a personally-significant moment. My dad passed away earlier that year and being on the sideline amidst all the cheers, I felt some form of connection to him. It was a goal that I’d worked towards for several months and I’d been using work as a grief-outlet, so the payoff is a special memory.

 

 

What might be something that you would like other staff to know about your job?

Greg: When the power goes out on campus, there is nothing I can do about it.

Travis: No day is the same.

Whitney: We know a little about a lot of things.

Josh: We’re always open to ideas about how we can make our spaces better.

 

 

What might be some ways that staff could collaborate or partner with you?

Greg: Because of the work we do, we already work with and collaborate with everyone.

Travis: Just by making sure to help in ensuring the building stays clean.

Whitney: The more the merrier when it comes to caring for and tending to physical spaces.

Josh: Beyond attending courses on the PEP with me, they could email me to discuss the facilities or student-staff.

 

 

Anything you would like to share that you would like other staff to know about you?

Greg: My wife and I have two beautiful children. Herrin is 6 years old and Callum is 7 months old.

Travis: No.

Whitney: I never intended my career path to lead to Student Affairs, but now I would be hard-pressed to imagine it going differently.

Josh: Once things are safe, everyone is welcome to say “hello”! Also, don’t hesitate to let us know if there’s anything we can do to make our facilities better. We want everyone to feel comfortable with the new normal of social-distancing in our spaces.

 

 

What advice would you have for new staff joining UGA Student Affairs?

Greg: Learn as much as possible about all the different departments. That information can be very beneficial later on.

Travis: Take advantage of the many professional development opportunities.

Whitney: Though times are different, make an effort to meet folks and attend events. Buy-in to your job and be convinced in the impact you make.

Josh: Don’t be afraid. Most of the people you work around can likely help and empathize with you.

 

 

What is one question you wished we asked and what is the answer?

Greg: Do you have any family that works at UGA? My lovely wife Mandi works in the School of Social Work.

Travis: None that I can think of.

Whitney: I believe we’ve covered it here. I was waiting to give my social security number and mother’s maiden name. This has been really fun!

Josh: What’s been my favorite flavor of ice cream during quarantine? Chocolate chip cookie dough.

 

 

What is the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

Greg: I drove in 20 demolition derbies over seven years. Won 11 times. I enjoyed tearing cars up and driving a car to its absolute limit.

Travis: Something recently that I have done that is personally cool is graduate with my Masters because I was not even planning to go back to school after undergrad.

Whitney: It was actually done for me; I was raised by the best group of people. Now talk about a good time.

Josh: My Costa Rica study abroad had a lot of cool moments. It was an awesome experience that expanded my perspective a lot.

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Student Affairs Learning Strategy

Student Affairs’ learning strategy is quite simple – deliver quality learning experiences beyond the classroom. This strategy extends Student Affairs’ current framework for student learning by shifting focus from discrete opportunities to a system of interconnected and sequential learning experiences.


Hallmarks of the Student Affairs Learning Strategy

  1. Not all Student Affairs offerings are learning experiences. Student Affairs offers an array of activities, programs, and resources ranging from transactional services to programs designed solely to promote students’ sense of belonging.  These offerings are essential to fulfilling the mission of Student Affairs.
  2. Learning experiences actively facilitate learning. Active facilitation of learning requires Student Affairs staff to design experiences from a learner-centered approach and to apply concepts from the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.
  3. Sequential learning experiences promote increasingly complex learning. Just as in the academic curriculum, learning experiences range from introductory to advanced allowing students to expand their learning.
  4. Learning experiences belong to pathways that extend throughout Student Affairs. Pathways allow students to identify experiences that reinforce and build upon one another regardless of the host department or area.

Essential Skills

To succeed in an ever-changing, interconnected future, more than ever, students need to develop and learn to apply discipline-crossing essential skills. As emphasized in findings from the National Academies of Sciences, the future will require educational opportunities that “increasingly emphasize creativity, adaptability, and interpersonal skills” to offer students the fullest opportunity to pursue their professional and personal ambitions in a dynamic world, throughout a lifetime.


Student Affairs Essential Skills

Student Affairs has identified the following essential skills as central to the development of UGA students:

  • Agility 
  • Communication
  • Critical Thinking
  • Leadership & Collaboration
  • Personal Well-Being
  • Social Awareness & Responsibility

Learn more about the Student Affairs Essential Skills initiative and the Learning Collaborative.

Staff Spotlights: Maggie Fitzsimmons

Maggie Fitzsimmons

Coordinator for Facilities - Recreational Sports
Woo - Individualization - Strategic - Positivity - Communication

 

Maggie was nominated for a Staff Award by a colleague, who said the following:

Maggie always takes time to help [student] staff understand the bigger picture....Her willingness to meet these students where they are....promotes the pillar of Intellect that the Division seeks to develop in our students.


 

Are you from Georgia? If not, where are you from? (i.e., where do you call “home”?)

I am from Gainesville, Florida and went to undergrad there as well. Most days I say Go Dawgs, but I am also a huge Gator fan!

 

How long have you worked at UGA?

Since November 2017.

 

What does a “day in the life” look like for you at work?

At Ramsey, I spend most of my days checking-in with student staff, answering patron questions, and addressing facility needs. Every day has its own unique concerns and successes.

 

What are three things you love most about your job?

My coworkers (students, graduate assistants, and full-time staff alike), enjoying the programs and facilities within RecSports for my own fitness and wellness, and the opportunities to get involved around campus.

 

Who do you look up to/ admire?

Of the 130 student staff members I supervise, two student leaders serve as, what we call, Program Assistants. These students are responsible for assisting me in facilitating the daily operations at Ramsey and the leading the staff. They are always willing to develop themselves and those around them. I admire their level of commitment to a part-time position while they juggle being a student.

 

What are things that you do for fun/hobbies?

I am in a doctoral program, so my main hobby is reading! Outside of that, I enjoy working out, gardening, and hanging out with my dogs, husband, and friends.

 

What might be something that you would like other staff to know about your job?

My office is right next to the vending machines in Ramsey. Come say hi and get a snack!

 

What might be some ways that staff could collaborate or partner with you?

I am always looking to hire students and love recommendations. We frequently give tours to new faculty and staff as well as hosting events for departments on campus.

 

Anything you would like to share that you would like other staff to know about you?

My favorite restaurant in town is Kelly’s and I will not be taking comments at this time.

 

What advice would you have for new staff joining UGA Student Affairs?

There are so many ways to get involved at a large campus, so don’t feel like you have to do everything at once. Get to know your job well and pick one or two things you’re interested in. More opportunities snowball as you spend more time at UGA.

 

What is one question you wished we asked and what is the answer?

I wished you asked, ‘what are you reading right now?’

I’m reading Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng and plan to watch the show next.

 

What is the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

I paraglided off the Teton Mountain Range in Jackson, Wyoming a few years ago. We jumped off the top of the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort slopes. I experienced G-force winds on the way down!

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Message to Students on Current Events

Pink flower in front of UGA Chapel looking up towards a blue sky

Like so many around the world, I am appalled by the senseless deaths of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Arbery, and now, Rayshard Brooks, following the violent deaths of too many Black community members before them.

I struggle with the injustice and structural inequities for Blacks that continue to persist so readily across society today. It is damning and unacceptable that racism and hatred still persist so stubbornly, even in our own communities.

Since arriving at UGA as a student in fall 1977, I can share first-hand that we have made strong progress in creating a more welcoming, inclusive environment for students—enjoying today our most diverse student body ever. But I also know we have said we must do better for far too long.

Even in providing needed care and support to students and staff during this most trying time, I have struggled with my own care and need for understanding and voice as a Black male. I have felt these recent events personally, deeply, and with great anguish. We have been here before, and we must stay no longer.

It has been heartening to see so many students and student groups across UGA step up and use their voices and move toward positive change.

To our Black students especially, I am proud of you. I, too, share the hurt and anger and struggle to make meaning. Please know I support you, and I stand here with you. We stand with you. And I know for me, I am not going anywhere.

In my lifetime, the path to justice and equity has been long and unsteady—and continues still. I challenge us all to learn from this moment and embrace the difficult conversations ahead to help our campus, communities, and nation come together and find meaningful, productive ways to create a more just society.

I am eager for our next steps together to further improve our student community at UGA and ensure the very best student experience possible. I will never waver on this goal.

Victor K. Wilson Signature
Victor K. Wilson
Vice President for Student Affairs
The University of Georgia

The Office of the
Vice President
for Student Affairs

306 Memorial Hall
Athens, GA 30602
706-542-3564
askstudentaffairs@uga.edu

 

Directions

From the Tate Center Parking Deck, take the elevator to the 3 rd floor. Walk across the courtyard with the UGA bookstore on your left hand side. Take the stairs up to the street. Cross Sanford Drive. Memorial Hall will be directly in front of you. Stay on the left side of the building and walk around to the side entrance for disability access. From the side door you can take the elevator to the third floor. If an elevator is not needed walk up all the stairs on the side of Memorial Hall and turn right, there you will see Reed Quad. Walk up the steps with the columns to the main entrance of the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.

For directions please call 706-542- 3564.

Staff Spotlights: Tim Smith

Tim Smith

Student Affairs Information Technology Lead – Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs

Restorative - Harmony - Responsibility - Adaptability - Includer

 

Tim was nominated by a colleague, who wrote:

Tim is a pillar of the Division. His unmatched collegiality, good humor, and exemplary work ethic make him a true pleasure to work with. He does a marvelous job ensuring Student Affairs is set up for success, and he and his team have done an amazing job to keep us running remotely the past couple months. I greatly appreciate his service to Student Affairs, and look forward to his leadership in his new role as Student Affairs Information Technology Lead.

 


 

Are you from Georgia? If not, where are you from? (i.e., where do you call “home”?)

Yes, I grew up North of Athens in Danielsville. I graduated from Madison County High School. I have lived there my entire life.

 

How long have you worked at UGA?

I have worked a total of 16 years at USG institutions. I have worked two different stints at UGA and also worked at Augusta University in between those two.

 

What does a “day in the life” look like for you at work?

My days consist of working alongside our OVPSA IT Team to ensure our Staff and students get the best support for any IT needs. I am also involved in assisting VPSA departments in IT planning for their technology needs.

 

What are three things you love most about your job?

  1. I love the comradery and friendship we have amongst our OVPSA IT group. They make every day fun and exciting regardless of what we face.
  2. I love getting to collaborate with our other VPSA departments to impact students with their technology needs even though we don’t work directly with students.
  3. I love working in the Tate Student Center which is the hub of the campus. It is a very busy place but it is exciting watching the students engage there daily.

 

Who do you look up to or admire?

Probably the person I admire and strive to be like most is my dad. Although he had very little education (2nd Grade), he was a very wise man and taught me more than anyone on how to live life and treat people. I have been accused of being too quiet in meetings before, but my dad always made the statement that you should listen twice as much as you should talk. That was the reason God gave you two ears and only one mouth.

 

What are things that you do for fun/hobbies?

I love to cook and BBQ. I have about three different types of smokers and there is nothing I enjoy more than cooking BBQ and watching people enjoy it. A good many of my weekends consists of smoking meat and sharing it with family and friends.

 

Anything you would like to share that you would like other staff to know about you?

I love volunteering at our church and I love college sports. I enjoy volunteering in my church with sound and video production. I also work part time with SEC officiating with Instant Replay for football and basketball. Although doing both can be challenging at times, I enjoy it immensely.

 

What advice would you have for new staff joining UGA Student Affairs?

You will love Student Affairs. Enjoy working with all the various departments and build as many relationships as you can. It is so rewarding being a part of this division and watching the impact it has on the UGA students.

 

What is one question you wished we asked and what is the answer?

What is your least favorite color? Orange! I hate orange! Any shade of it. Go Dawgs!

 

What is the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

I hit a hole in one on the 12th hole of golf I ever played. Some work friends talked me into playing in a work tournament with them. I bought some clubs and showed up at the UGA Golf course that Saturday. On the Par 3 12th hole, I hit the perfect shot (and the luckiest). I was so new to golf; I really didn’t realize how big of a deal it was. My thought was, isn’t that what you are supposed to do? [Laughs.]

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Staff Spotlights: Missy Jackson

Missy Jackson

WHNP-BC, University Health Center

Empathy - Developer - Consistency - Positivity - Belief


Missy was nominated for a Staff Spotlight by a colleague. To nominate a colleague for a future Staff Spotlight, click here. Missy's nominator wrote:

Everyone at UGA has many major priorities right now...

But I thought about the person I nominated for the Student Affairs Staff Award - Missy Jackson, NP - a clinician at the University Health Center.  I nominated her before Covid-19.

But wanted to let you know that her initiative, her skills, her caring has only increased since the Covid-19 pandemic.  She (and others) are working tirelessly to have Telehealth available for our students; she has worked on protocols to care for students remotely (a new concept for us), and she has shown that empathy and caring for coworkers is part of what makes us say we are proud to be on the front lines during this pandemic.

 

Are you from Georgia? If not, where are you from? (i.e., where do you call “home”?)

 

I’m actually a 5th generation Athenian on my father’s side. My mother was also born and raised in Athens. My parents both graduated from Athens High School (now Clarke Central High School). I graduated from Cedar Shoals in 1992, where I met my husband, Travis. We love Athens and are so grateful that we have had the opportunity to raise our children in this community and both work on campus (Travis is the Senior Director of Total Rewards in Human Resources).

 

How long have you worked at UGA?

 

I’ve worked at UGA for almost 4 years.

 

What does a “day in the life” look like for you at work?

 

I am a nurse practitioner in the Women’s Clinic at the Health Center. The majority of my day is spent providing care to patients. As a nurse practitioner in the Women’s Clinic, I provide routine gynecological care including contraception, STI screening and treatment, pap smears and wellness exams, [as well as] caring for people experiencing gynecological problems. I also have the opportunity to serve on committees that further the mission of the Health Center, including the Sexual Assault Response Committee and Quality Council. During the COVID-19 crisis, I’ve been involved in the process of adding telemedicine to our services. 

 

What are three things you love most about your job?

 

First and foremost, I love the students. Providing health care to students is rewarding because not only am I providing for their health care needs, but I am helping them learn to navigate the health care system. Second, I love my colleagues. The people that work at the Health Center are some of the most caring people I’ve ever known. I consider it an honor and privilege to go to work every day with this group of people who are committed to providing holistic, patient-centered medical care in a compassionate manner. Finally, I love being a part of the University community. Since becoming a nurse practitioner, I’ve worked in private practice and rural health care. I loved both of those jobs, but there is something special about working at the University of Georgia.

 

Who do you look up to or admire?

 

In my career I have had the opportunity to work with an immeasurable number of amazing people; in my personal life I have many incredible friends and family. I’m thankful for supportive parents and in-laws and an awesome husband and some pretty great kids that I admire greatly. But from a professional standpoint, I would have to say that hands down, my first nursing manager at St. Mary’s Hospital Labor and Delivery, Ms. Jane Kimble, will always be the medical professional I admire the most. Ms. K, as we called her, not only taught me how to be a nurse, but she modeled for me an impeccable work ethic. She encouraged me to become a nurse practitioner and helped pave the way for this career path. I am so grateful that she took a chance on me as a new graduate nurse 22 years ago. She passed away several years ago and I miss our late-night chats and [the] ability to call her when I’m facing a professional challenge that I need to talk through. She always had sound advice for me.

 

What are things that you do for fun/hobbies?

 

While I’m not very good at it, I love to paint. I also love to read historical fiction, and when I can, I really like to do that at the beach. 

 

What might be something that you would like other staff to know about your job?

 

I often say that the Health Center is one of the best kept secrets at the University. We are not “just the infirmary.” The University Health Center is one of the top college health centers in the country, providing comprehensive care to students in a state-of-the-art facility with exceptional clinicians.

 

What might be some ways that staff could collaborate or partner with you?

 

Any staff who is aware of a female or trans male patient in need of gynecological care should always refer them to our clinic. In addition, I think it is important to know that I, along with my colleagues in the Women’s Clinic, are happy to collaborate with anyone on campus who needs to provide education about gynecology topics to their students or student groups.

 

What is the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

 

The coolest thing I’ve ever done is zip line across a river in the rain forest of Costa Rica. I was there serving on a mission trip with my church and we had the opportunity to either go hiking, zip lining, or lay by the pool on our free day. I’m incredibly terrified of heights, but could not pass up the opportunity to see the rainforest from this perspective. While in the canopy I saw sloth and several different species of birds including macaws and a toucan.

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Digital Engagement
During the COVID-19 Crisis

Students Gathered around a table

Supporting Our Students Remotely

Supporting students remotely may be new for many of us, though some of us may already be experts. Either way, now is the time for each of us to be active in our online student engagement, connect them to resources, and most importantly, ensure they know we care and we’re here to help.

Remote student support requires more than being attentive to your email inbox – it will require proactivity and effort on our part to locate and engage with the students.

This page contains unofficial, informal guidance on supporting our students via online tools. It’s not a playbook, as much as some general ideas to get you started as we continue to support our students while they are away from campus.

 

What do I do?

You know your students, and you probably know which forums they use the most (how do they normally engage with your office?). Go to those platforms (whether on Facebook, GroupMe, Twitter, etc.) and make yourself available. Reach out to students and ask them to engage with you - to ask questions, express concerns, share support.

When you are “live” on a platform, post an initial post of “[Your name and role] is online and live to chat and answer your questions. Tweet @[your handle] or use the #[your hashtag] or post in the comments below, etc.”

Initially, students are not going to come to you, so you will have to reach out to them. You can do this macro, “Hey UGA students – do you have questions? Come chat with me!” or individually, “Hey @[student handle], I hate that we missed our weekly meeting today. How are you doing? Do you have any questions for me?”

If you are more astute at online communication, feel free to post live on Facebook and invite questions via the comments, or host a Reddit “ask me anything” chat. Be creative – represent the University well, and refer to official University statements and resources when possible, but be present and support the students. “I don’t know – let me check on that for you” is a fine answer.

 

What if I don’t do social media?

That’s okay. Anyone can type an email, right? Ask your supervisor if it’s okay for you to communicate to students individually via email. You could simply start out with a particular student organization list, and start working your way through one by one. Individual, personalized communication will work best (single emails to entire lists are good for general information, but not for genuine connection).

 

What do we talk about?

So this isn’t necessarily about converting your daily job or student program into a digital format (although if you figure that out – awesome, go for it!) as much as it is about ensuring the students continue to feel engaged and supported during this strange time.

As we always are, we are here to support and serve the students. The simplest conversation can begin “just checking in. This is strange, isn’t it? Do you have questions? What are you worried about? Can I try to help with something?” and go from there. They may have specific questions for something not in your area, but you can offer to investigate for them. In short, be supportive, be a good listener, and work to find an answer whenever possible.

As always, please be mindful of the climate on social media before posting — just a quick check to make sure your posts are not tone deaf or insensitive to current events. This includes not just your post topic, but your tone on social (be careful with exclamation points, emojis, and gifs right now).

 

I'm a student - how can I help?

You can be as helpful in keeping your friends and fellow students connected as anybody! If you're a student organization leader or member, go ahead and check in with the other members of your student org and see how everyone is doing. Once you get in the routine of your online classwork, you and your fellow members may decide you might like to set up an online org meeting. That's awesome! Touch base with your Student Affairs adviser to let them know you're doing so, and for assistance in setting a meeting up.

 

Post Your Availability and Medium

It’s helpful for students to know when and how to reach you. It is a good practice to set times and platforms to be available and to post those on social, or provide them to your director for posting on your website. For example “John Doe will be available on Facebook at 2p to answer your questions” or the like. Or “Jane Doe will be checking the J.doe@uga.edu email inbox in real time at 2p today.” Then, make sure you’re immediately responsive during those times.

 

General Guidance on Content for Social Media Managers

There is no expectation to keep posting at this time, but if you do want to keep sharing content, here are some good options:

  • Updates + FAQ: Our highest priority right now is to make sure FAQs and campus updates are communicated and would appreciate your help with getting those messages out. (Don’t worry about the swipe up on Instagram stories, just point people to follow @universityofga for ongoing updates.)
  • Closures: Lots of events have been canceled/postponed or services have altered their schedules. Please share those if it’s relevant to your audience.
  • Campus Photos: If you have photos of cleaning (busses, windows, classrooms) or prep work for online learning (video conferencing), etc.
  • Relevant Content: Our team is working on some UGA research and expertise angles (everything from healthy tips to how to entertain kids to economic impact of a pandemic). Those stories should start trickling out on news.uga.edu over the weekend if not early next week.

 

Types of Posts

Now is a good time to produce valuable news-you-can-use content related to current events. The following types of posts are good options for conveying this information in a concise manner : 

  • Listicles
  • Quick Tips + Facts
  • Infographics
  • Quotes from Faculty Experts

 

Additional items to keep in mind:

  • Consider pausing any paid digital campaigns running.
  • Please do not alter or create your own emergency graphics or health guidelines.
  • Don't be the expert. Questions about COVID-19 and other health related matters are best left to the medical professionals to answer. Refer your students to DPH and CDC resources for those types of questions.
  • Share and amplify central communications and updates (these are typically posted after an ArchNews).
  • Post timely notifications and updates to Twitter and Instagram stories only — Facebook and Instagram Feed are algorithmic and can cause confusion if people see that post days later.
  • Please tag UGA Student Affairs and UGA in any cancelations or FAQ responses that need to be amplified centrally.

 

If you are receiving questions, point them to UGA’s page for Coronavirus (COVID-19) Information and Resources.

UGA Marketing and Communications is also developing content around health, wellness and prevention, so please do not create your own. Instead, look to amplify those messages over the next few days.

Tips to Prevent Zoom-bombing

Zoom is a video and web meeting and conferencing application that faculty, staff, and students at UGA can use to connect with each other virtually. Learn how to set up a secure and private zoom meeting that will prevent "zoom-bombing".

Digital Engagement

Contact Us

306 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Wes Summers
Digital Engagement Lead for Student Affairs
wsummers@uga.edu

Stan Jackson
Assistant to the Vice President for Communications, Data, and Technology
​ugastan@uga.edu

Student Affairs Social Media

IPhone and Ipad with many social media apps

Social media is an integral part of the conversation, both on campus and worldwide. To utilize social media effectively, you must prioritize it in your communications strategy and make a daily effort to engage your audience. An active social media presence is indicative of an active program/department, and many in your audience will form their first impressions of you from your social media pages. 

 

What should I know about using my personal accounts?
Regardless of the strictest of privacy settings, there is nothing private about using social media. Remember that you represent yourself, your family, your friends and the University of Georgia with each and every post. It's much, much easier to think better of making a borderline post than to have to go back and do damage control after you've already hit submit. Post thoughtfully. 

 

How do I get shared by UGA Student Affairs main accounts?
UGA Student Affairs won't be able to share everything, but the best way by far to get the attention of our pages is to tag us in your post. That sends us a notification, and more often than not, we're happy to retweet and share. 

Social Media Guidelines

Email UGA's Social Media Principal

Kalena Stull serves as the University's social media principal, and is happy to answer your questions pertaining to all things social media.

UGA Student Affairs on Twitter

UGA Student Affairs on Instagram

UGA Student Affairs Facebook Page

Contact Us

306 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Stan Jackson
Assistant to the Vice President for Communications, Data, and Technology
ugastan@uga.edu

Using University and Student Affairs Logos

Approval Process

1. If working with a vendor, ensure they are a licensed vendor of the University of Georgia. Click here to view a list of licensed vendors.

2. Provide the final art exactly as it will appear on the printed/produced item. When working with a vendor, provide the final art proof from the vendor.

3. Complete the trademark use approval form. 

4. Send an email to trademarks@uga.edu and copy the appropriate communications contact for your area, and attach the final art and the trademark use approval form. 

List of communications contacts:

University Housing: Carrie Campbell (carrie.campbell@uga.edu)

University Health Center: Stan Jackson (ugastan@uga.edu)

Recreational Sports, Club Sports, Intramural Teams, and other student organizations advised out of Recreational Sports: Heather Arnold (heather.arnold@uga.edu)

Student organizations advised out of Engagement, Leadership, and Service, Office of the Dean of Students, Disability Resource Center, Student Care and Outreach, Student Veterans Resource Center, Tate Student Center, and University Testing Services: Don Reagin (dreagin@uga.edu)

All other Division of Student Affairs departments: Stan Jackson (ugastan@uga.edu)

You will receive feedback and/or approval swiftly. 

***The vendors participate in a separate approval process directly with University Trademarks. They may say "I've already gotten approval from the University." You should not proceed until YOU have the signed trademarks use approval form in hand. You need this internal approval for your records, and most importantly, for payment!

***If your organization is advised directly out of a school or college, please contact that school or college's communciations department for trademark use approval of your items. 

Please build at least two weeks for art and logo use approval into your production timelines to allow time for possible requested tweaks and edits. This means two weeks before your due date to send approval to your printer for on-time delivery, not two weeks from your expected delivery date. We desire to be respectful of your timeline and do our utmost to be as swift and efficient in the approval process as possible, but we are unable to approve non-compliant logo and trademark use, regardless of the urgency of your timeline. 

 

What Requires Approval?

The following items must be submitted to trademarks@uga.edu and ugastan@uga.edu with the trademark use approval form for approval:
- any products, apparel, and merchandise created for internal (promotional items/giveaways/awards/trophies/nametags) or external (fundraiser/sale items) usage. 
- paid advertising materials

The following items require approval only from your department's communications contact with no trademark use form needed:
brochures, magazines, annual reports, catalogs, invitations, printed calendars, cards, flyers, folders, newsletters, posters

 

Logo and Trademark Use

The University of Georgia logo, including Student Affairs division, department and program logos, and its basic configurations may be used by any program which has a formal association with the University of Georgia. These logos are to be used for non-profit purposes, unless formally licensed through Fermata Partners, our licensing partner, and in accordance with the guidelines set forth in this publication. The athletic marks will continue to be used for athletic-related activites.

Any intended use of the University of Georgia name or logo on merchandise, whether it is to be sold or given away, must be approved by the Office of Trademark Management and Licensing Office in the Marketing & Communications office. Additionally, use of the logo by Student Affairs departments and student organizations must likewise be approved by Student Affairs Communications and Marketing Initiaves. Further approvals may be required at the department level, at the department's discretion. 

 

Student Affairs Visual Identity Guidelines

In addition to the guidlines provided by the University, there are a few processes and guidelines specific to Student Affairs logo and trademark usage.

Click here to view the Student Affairs Visual Identity Guidelines.

Logo Use Approval Form

Licensed Vendors

Once on the UGA Brand Resources page, scroll down to the "Approved Vendors" list.

Student Affairs Visual Identity Guidelines

University of Georgia Trademark Policy

UGA Visual Style Guide

Student Affairs Logo Download Center

UGA Digital Art Sheet/Trademarks

UGA Logo Download Center

University of Georgia Font Set

Includes Trade Gothic, Merriweather, and Oswald font sets.

UGA Athletics Brand Manual

Contact Us

306 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Stan Jackson
Assistant to the Vice President for Communications, Data, and Technology
ugastan@uga.edu

About our Org Charts

The UGA Student Affairs leadership team organizational chart.

The UGA Student Affairs leadership team organizational chart.

Representing Collaboration

University of Georgia Student Affairs is dynamic, organic and agile - one team, committed to greatness. Staff aren't isolated in blocks and columns and silos, but rather interconnected with many others throughout the organziation. We realize that our org chart is a direct expression of how we want to be seen as an organization. Traditional org charts employ a blocky, top-down, rigid structure that denotes a strong hierarchy of authority and bureaucracy. So we asked ourselves, "Is that what UGA Student Affairs is? Rigid and bureaucratic?" We think not, so we decided to take a different approach. The relationship isn't top-down, but back and forth. Each staffer supports the others, working toward the same mission: making the learning environment the best it can be. 

We've received a lot of compliments on this visualization, and requests to copy the design. We're humbled and thrilled that our peers like the approach! You are certainly welcome to employ this visualization for your organization. There’s no need to provide explicit credit on the documents themselves, but we might ask that you note the original source of the visualization in your records somehow, so that if asked by other peers, you may share that University of Georgia Student Affairs had the neat idea. 

If you'd like to see examples of some of our departmental org charts click here to view the UGA Staff directory. Filtering by a department will give you the option of downloading the department's org chart.

See below for addtional resources. 

Office of the Vice President
for Student Affairs Organizational Chart

This organizational chart shows the staff within the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.

UGA Student Affairs Division Level
Organizational Chart

This organizational chart shows the departmental structure of the entire division of Student Affairs.

Contact Us

306 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Stan Jackson
Assistant to the Vice President for Communications, Data, and Technology
ugastan@uga.edu

Student Affairs Visual Identity Guidelines

University Guidelines

Communications, marketing and promotional materials produced by Student Affairs departments and student organizations should adhere to the University guidelines found at brand.uga.edu. Specifically, on materials that utilize the University's and Division's visual identity and trademarks, Student Affairs departments and student organizations should adhere to the University's Visual Style Guide. The University uses the Trade Gothic, Oswald and Merriweather fonts in wordmarks and other visual identity pieces.

Click here to download the University Fonts.  

 

Student Affairs Supplemental Visual Identity Guidelines and Reminders

In addition to the guidelines provided by the University, there are a few processes and guidelines specific to Student Affairs logo and trademark usage:

Horizontal Logo Format
In the Student Affairs division and department logo sets, you'll find options for "Formal" and "Horizontal" treatments. The preferred treatment for Student Affairs materials is the "Horizontal" treatment, with the department name at the top. Formal treatments are appropriate for pieces aimed at external audiences. 

Formal logo is for external audiences. Horizontal logo is for campus audiences.


Imperative Department/Division Logo Placement
As part of the effort to tell the story of Student Affairs' holistic effort to enhance the engagement, intellect and character of each student, Student Affairs departments are required to place their respective department's logo on all communications, marketing and promotional materials. 
 

Sizing
Generally, the logo shield with date should never appear less than 1/2” tall in printed materials, and no less than 36px tall in digital applications. Minimum size is determined by the height of the shield icon and applies to all configurations. The proportions of the type to the shield icon should never be altered. If an application requires the logo to appear between 1/2” - 3/8” tall, please remove the date. At this size, the date becomes illegible.

Click here to view the UGA Visual Style Guide section on "Minimum Size."

 

Color Variations

The colors used in the university wordmark help make it a distinguishable element of Georgia’s identity. It is important to be consistent in the use of color. When one color or full color variations are used on black, red or dark backgrounds, the type and ™ reverse to white. Inks, presses, papers and screens vary considerably when it comes to rendering exact colors. For that reason, we highly recommend referring to the Pantone® Matching System (PMS) for consistent and accurate color reproduction. 

Click here to view the UGA Visual Style Guide section on "Color Variation".

 

Logo color variation example

 


Taglines
A unique tagline can be displayed in combination with department logos. In order for the logo and tagline to be effective, they must be maintained within a clear space into which no other elements may intrude. The clear space defined for taglines is the x-height of the Georgia wordmark. Taglines should be set in all caps Trade Gothic Bold. It should be set at approximately 75% of the single line college name. Do not add taglines to the university’s logo.

Click here to view the UGA Visual Style Guide section on "Taglines."

Tagline usage example
Inter-Departmental Partnerships
Student Affairs departments and other University units collaborate often, and a logo treatment has been created to give recognition without placing multiple logos. The primary sponsoring department's logo should be placed, and then either to the right of or below the logo, the collaborating departments should be listed in alphabetical order.. 

In the case of equal collaboration among Student Affairs departments solely, the Student Affairs logo should be placed, and then to the right of or below the logo, the collaborating departments should be listed in alphabetical order.

In the case of equal collaboration with other campus units outside of Student Affairs, the University logo should be placed, and then either to the right of or below the logo, the collaborating departments should be listed in alphabetical order, AND "Division of Student Affairs" should be included in the department listing.

Click here to download the University "Expanding Column Separator ( I Bar )" graphic.

 

Logo usage with multiple department listing.

Vertical Orientation Option - UGA I Bar not required

departmental co-branding with departments listed below the main logo.

Co-Branding
Student Affairs departments often co-sponsor events with student organizations and entities external to campus. For student organizations that are advised directly out of a Student Affairs department, designers should utilize the co-branding treatments in the University Visual Style Guide. The department logo should be placed, the "I Bar" should be placed to the right of or below the logo, and then the logo of the student organization may be placed. The same treatment may be applied to cases where a specific program has a defined or annually used logo. In cases where space is limited, alternate treatments may be produced, but the designer should default to the primary co-branding treatment whenever possible. 

Click here to download the University "Expanding Column Separator ( I Bar )" graphic.

Co-branding example

Social Media
Student Affairs departments should default to utilizing the University logo for their social media badges and profile images. The "shield" with the "Georgia" wordmark placed beneath should be placed, followed by the appropriate department name. Please refrain from using acronyms unless absolutely necessary, though commonly used abbreviations are acceptable (ie. "RecSports"). 

From time to time, departments may certainly choose a profile picture to promote a specific program or initiaitive, but should refrain from utilizing "alternate" marks that represent the department. 

social media example

 

Graphic Design Assistance
The staff at Tate Print & Copy are trained in the division-specific visual style guidelines and are in direct communication with Student Affairs Communications and Marketing Initiatives. As such, they are best positioned to assist you with your department-specific design needs. 

Click here to contact Tate Print & Copy. 
 

Contact Us

306 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Stan Jackson
Assistant to the Vice President for Communications, Data, and Technology
ugastan@uga.edu

Telling the Student Affairs Story

The Georgia Story

 

As people, we all want to hear from other human beings. We trust them. And even though the University of Georgia is an institution, the last way we would ever want to sound is institutional. So we ensure that our brand has a human personality, a human spirit and a human voice. Through the right tone and attitude, and through careful word choice, our messages resonate with our audiences and create an identity that is ours alone.

In recent years, branding in higher education has become critical to engaging audiences, shifting perceptions and communicating a university’s mission to the world. With our brand, the University of Georgia has the power to educate and inspire, and so does our story.

 

The Student Affairs Story

“To inspire students” is a purposeful commitment. It goes beyond mere preparation for life beyond graduation. The world-class education provided by the University of Georgia not only equips students with the knowledge and skills to tackle some of the world’s grand challenges, but also inspires them through meaningful experiences that compel them to lead.

UGA Student Affairs fully embraces the University’s emphasis on rigorous learning experiences, hands-on research, and leadership opportunities. Some of the longest lasting impressions from UGA students’ college careers will be from their involvement with Student Affairs. Through our focus on the engagement, intellect and character of each student, we take great pride in the value that Student Affairs’ learning experiences add to a University of Georgia degree.

 

Our Mission  

To inspire students to engage meaningfully, grow intellectually, and build character so they will create thriving communities.

 

Our Values

Lifelong Learning
We are always learning and open to growth, and we foster this in others.

Community
We value full participation for all, with equity and respect.

Excellence
We seek the best in all we do.

Students
We are here #forthestudents.

UGA Editorial Style Guide

Contact Us

306 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Stan Jackson
Assistant to the Vice President for Communications, Data, and Technology
ugastan@uga.edu

Produce Great Videos with
your Smartphone

A student taking a video of UGA President Jere Morehead with his smartphone.

A primer on the basics of smartphone video production

TLDR:

  • The Goal: This isn’t about perfection. You’re striving for decent quality audio and video, interesting, informative, and authentic content, and a reasonable length.
  • The Scene: Choose a background that is interesting without being too busy or distracting. Make sure you can control the environment you’re filming in and avoid interruptions.
  • Audio: Beware of the outdoors, they're noisy and unpredictable. Use earbuds with built in mic or a second phone to get better audio in challenging environments.
  • Lighting: Take advantage of natural light if available, move artificial lighting sources around if you can. The subject should be lit from the front and both sides as evenly as possible. Avoid backlighting.
  • Camera Settings: Go with as high a resolution as you can while keeping in mind the final media file size. The higher the frame rate, the smoother the video, but 30fps is fine for most contexts. Clean your lens!
  • Production Quality: Avoid digital zoom, zoom with your feet instead. Shoot horizontal (landscape) not vertical (portrait). Stabilize the phone as much as possible with a tripod, selfie stick, or by holding with two hands and relying on image stabilization. Lock your focus and exposure to mitigate your phone continually hunting for focus and exposure while you’re shooting. Keep it simple. Avoid special effects, time-lapse, slow motion and other “advanced” techniques if you aren’t familiar with them.  
  • Get down to Business: A good video consists of an Intro (who are you and what is this about), a body (the meat of the video), and an Outro (calls to action and “Thanks for watching!”). The Intro and Outro should only be a few seconds long each. Outline your talking points and perfect your delivery. The tone should be conversational, not formal. Keep it short. Some platforms have time constraints for video and others have recommended times backed up by market research. Generally, keep it between 30 seconds and 2 minutes.

 

The Goal

Creating videos with your smartphone isn’t about perfection. This isn’t a Hollywood studio level production. In fact, for most of the platforms you’ll be targeting (social media) too high of a production quality can come across as unauthentic. What you’re going for is a competently produced video that covers the basics of good technique. Namely, decent quality audio and video, interesting, informative, and authentic content, and a reasonable length.

 

Setting the Scene

Creating compelling video starts with picking the right “canvas”. Choose an area with a background that is aesthetically pleasing without being distracting. Make sure the background isn’t too busy and that there will be a good contrast between the subject and the background. Ensure that you have a good degree of control over the space or environment where you will be filming. Somewhere where you can rearrange furniture and lighting and can control noise is preferable. Finally, find a space where there will be little potential for being interrupted.

PRO TIP: Use your phone’s LCD as a “frame”. Pan it around a space to find the best possible composition for your subject and background, while keeping in mind the lighting as you do so. Once you’ve found the best frame, mark the spot and orientation so you can set up your scene.

 

Audio

While it may be tempting to film outside, be aware that, especially in urban areas, the outdoors are noisy. Vehicles and planes will go by regularly while you are filming and are unpredictable. You could be in the middle of the “perfect take” when your neighbor decides to start up her lawn mower. Even without cars, planes, and lawn mowers, there is a large amount of ever-present ambient noise outside that can overwhelm the microphone built into your smart phone.

PRO TIP: One way to mitigate ambient noise is to wear earbuds that have a built-in microphone instead of relying on your smartphone’s mic. Another technique is to use two phones. Use one phone to record video and set the second phone to record audio and put it in your subject’s shirt pocket. This way, you can get the best camera angle and the best possible audio simultaneously. The downside to this second technique though is that it requires post-production editing to sync up the audio and video from the two phones.

 

Lighting

Since you don’t have access to studio lighting, take advantage of the natural light that windows provide in addition to whatever artificial lighting the space has. Note the strongest source of light in the space and use that to your advantage. In the best lighting scenarios, the subject will be evenly lit from the direction of the camera and both sides. Light coming from behind the subject will cause him/her to be silhouetted, which will put them in shadow and create problems with exposure and focus. Prevent backlighting by ensuring that you don’t have a window or bright light source directly behind the subject.

Pro TIP: If filming outdoors, be aware of the time of day and the weather. Noon on a clear day may seem like a good scenario, but in reality the intense sunlight creates harsh shadows on the subject’s face and will cause them to squint, while an overcast or cloudy day or shooting at dusk or dawn on a clear day can produce a softer, more even light.

 

Camera Settings

Before taking video on your phone, make sure you’ve set it up properly. One important setting is video resolution. Most modern smartphones are capable of taking video in 1080 HD or even 4K resolutions. The higher the resolution, the sharper and more detailed the image. Aim for at least 720p or above.

Next, check the frame rate, which sets how many individual frames per second (fps) your video records. Common settings are 30 fps, 60 fps, and less commonly, 24 fps. The higher the number, the smoother-looking video you’ll produce. However, most video is shot at 30 fps and this will be sufficient for most people’s needs.  

The steps for setting resolution and framerate vary depending on phone model and OS, but are generally easy to find in your camera app.

When choosing your resolution and frame rate it is important to understand how this affects the size of the media file that will be produced. The higher the frame rate and resolution, the bigger the file you will output. For instance, a five-second video shot at 4K-resolution will be roughly four times the size of the same video shot in 1080 HD resolution. Note the amount of space you have on your phone before you begin and take some test videos at different lengths and resolutions before starting your actual video to ensure that you will have enough space on your phone for the final video file.

PRO TIP: Before you shoot anything, clean your lens. When we’re not getting fingerprints all over them, a smartphone lives in your pocket with the lint and dust. A dirty lens can have a noticeable effect on the image quality of your video. Use a microfiber cloth or lens cleaning wipe if you have them, or gently wipe your lens with a damp paper towel before you start shooting.

 

Achieving Good Production Quality

  • Avoid using digital zoom. Most current smartphones don’t have optical zoom like a dedicated SLR camera. Instead they use a software driven digital zoom, which lowers the resolution and image quality and can produce bad results. It’s best to avoid using zoom altogether, but if you must zoom, zoom with your feet. Move the camera physically closer to the subject instead of using the camera's digital zoom.
  • Orient your phone horizontally (landscape). Nothing says “amateur” more than a vertically (portrait) aligned video shot on a smartphone. You’re striving for authenticity, not incompetence. While Instagram and Snapchat accommodate and seemingly push users to create vertically aligned video, you’ll get a much more competent looking video by sticking with a horizontal format.
  • Use a tripod if you have one. In lieu of a tripod, a selfie stick taped to a chair or ladder is also an option. This will ensure that your video will be stable and the shot will be consistent if you need multiple takes. If you don’t have a tripod or selfie stick, use two hands to hold your phone when recording. Most smartphones have built in image stabilization, and with two hands the image can be almost as stable as with a tripod.
  • Lock Focus and Exposure. In less optimal lighting conditions, or in places where you can’t totally control the environment (like outdoors) your smartphone may try to continually hunt for optimal focus and exposure while you’re recording. To prevent this, once you’ve got your scene and subject set up, make sure your exposure looks good and the subject is in focus, and then lock both the exposure and the focus in place. On Android devices, tapping on the screen at the point where you want to focus will lock it on that point.  On iPhones, holding your finger in place at the focal point will lock it. Most smartphones will also provide a way to lock the exposure, but the method depends on your specific phone model and OS.
  • Keep it simple. Don’t try to use slow motion, time-lapse, multiple camera angles or visual effects if you’re new at this. These are features more suitable for highly experienced vloggers and editors and, when used poorly, can ruin an otherwise good video.

 

Get Down to Business

The anatomy of a good video:

  • Intro: This is where you introduce yourself and the theme/subject of the video. In vlogs, typically there are animations or montages, music, and graphics involved in the intro as well, but for the purposes of this primer we will ignore those. You’re telling your audience what the video is about and what they’re going to get out of it. Generally, the intro leads into the body of the video by saying, “So let’s get started” or something to that effect. Your intro should be short and sweet, no more than a few seconds.
  • Body: This is the main content of the video and the meat of what the video is all about. This should be the longest section of your video.
  • Outro: This is the conclusion of the video where you recap what you talked about, state any call(s) to action (“make sure to like and follow” and/or “go to our website for more details” etc) and thank your audience for watching. With vlogs there may be a closing montage or animation and music, but as stated in the intro, that is outside of the scope of this document. Again, keep it short and sweet, no more than a few seconds.
     

Perfect your delivery
Know your content and practice delivering it without having to think too much about it. Avoid unnecessary pauses and words like, “um”, “ah”, “like” etc.  While having a script can be helpful, you can come across as insincere if you sound too robotic in your delivery or like you’re reading from a page. It’s best to have a good outline of your talking points and practice delivering those “off the cuff” rather than writing out every word. Do as many takes as you need, but remember that perfection isn’t the goal. Your goal is interesting, informative, and authentic. Finally, time yourself to ensure that you can stay within the time constraints of the platform on which you’re posting.

Keep it short
There are multiple reasons why less is more with video:

  • The longer the video, the bigger the video file. Potentially leading to storage and processing issues on your device.
  • Unless you’re an experienced video editor with video editing software and equipment, your editing capabilities are limited. The shorter the video, the less potential editing you have to do. In fact, you should aim at attempting to eliminate all editing by doing one take. You may still have to trim a few seconds off of the beginning or end, which you can easily do with the editing tools on your phone.
  • Your audience has a limited attention span. It’s not their fault, it’s simply a characteristic of the digital online space. At any given moment, there are multiple other things competing for your audience’s attention. To ensure that they’re going to get your message, keep it brief. If you can’t cover the subject in the time limits listed below, you should probably consider doing a series of videos instead of just one.
  • Video length is limited on some platforms. According to the digital agency 2060Digital, the following are the current video length requirements/recommendations by social media platform (n.d., Aschmidt):
    • Facebook
      • Your videos should be no more than two minutes in length. Multiple studies (including this one from Wistia) have shown that for most videos, engagement tends to fall off sharply after the two-minute mark.
      • Short videos that are fun and/or informative and are able to be easily understood without sound tend to be the best performers on Facebook.
      •  It is better to upload your video directly to Facebook rather than including a YouTube link, as Facebook’s algorithm tends to prioritize native video content.
    • Twitter
      • Your videos should be no more than 30 seconds in length, since Twitter currently has a 30-second limit for video content.
      • Consider using video on Twitter as a way to “tease” full-length content that can be found on your website.
      • One of the most effective uses for Twitter video is to post short comments, replies or reactions to questions or messages from fans and followers.
    • Instagram
      • Your videos should be no more than 60 seconds in length, as that is the upper limit for what the platform will support. Data compiled by HubSpot suggests 30 seconds might be an ideal time frame, as Instagram videos that received the most comments typically averaged about 26 seconds in length.
      •  Be sure to use plenty of relevant hashtags to facilitate easier discovery of your videos.
    • YouTube
      • For optimal engagement, keep your videos around the two-minute mark.
      • As the preeminent digital video platform, YouTube lends itself to more in-depth content such how-to tutorials, FAQ sessions, video blogs (vlogs), etc.
      • Consider YouTube to be a “digital library” where you can store a repository of video content that can be organized into various playlists by topic. As you continue adding videos to your channel, you will accumulate an impressive catalog of visual assets that will be engaging and helpful to the audience you’re trying to reach.

Sources

Aschmidt. The Right Video Length for Each Platform. 2060Digital. No Date. https://2060digital.com/blog/right-video-length-platform/

O’Kane, Sean. How to shoot great video with your smartphone. The Verge. July, 2017. https://www.theverge.com/2017/7/26/16026238/smartphone-video-editing-apps-how-to-tips-iphone-android

Sullivan, Terry. A Beginner’s Guide to Taking Great Video on Your Phone. The New York Times, April, 2018, https://www.nytimes.com/2018/04/17/smarter-living/beginners-guide-phone-video.html

Varsha. Top 20 Tips to Shoot Better Video on Your Smartphone. TurboFuture. March, 2018. https://turbofuture.com/cell-phones/Top-20-Tips-To-Shoot-Better-Video-On-Your-Smartphone

Digital Engagement

Contact Us

306 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Wes Summers
Digital Engagement Lead for Student Affairs
wsummers@uga.edu

Stan Jackson
Assistant to the Vice President for Communications, Data, and Technology
​ugastan@uga.edu

Preventing Zoombombing

What is Zoombombing?

Zoom is a fantastic tool for facilitating online meetings and web-conferences. However, due to the open nature of the platform, it is possible for people with malicious intent to guess or obtain Zoom meeting links and crash your meetings. Luckily, there are some easy steps that all Zoom meeting hosts can take to prevent this from happening.

 

Steps to Prevent Zoombombing

  1. Don't use your personal Zoom ID to create meetings. This ID assigned to you by Zoom doesn't change, so if it gets into the hands of the wrong person they can interlope on all your meetings that use this ID from then on. Instead have Zoom generate a random meeting ID for each meeting you create. Click here for an overview on how to set up Zoom meetings.
  2. Don't share your Zoom meeting link on a public platform like social media. If you must share on a public platform, require authentication for your guests. There are a number of ways you can authenticate guests including using a custom meeting password, the guest's own email, or even two-factor authentication.  Click here for information on how to authenticate your guests.
  3. Allow only signed-in users to join the meeting. Zoom has the ability to allow only participants who are signed into Zoom with the email address used for their meeting invite. Click here for information on how to allow only signed-in users to join a Zoom meeting. 
  4. Make sure that only the host of the meeting can share their screen. This can prevent a troll from hijacking the video stream to show things that you and your guests don't want to see. Click here for information on how to control screen sharing.
  5. Turn off in-meeting file sharing. This will prevent an interloper from potentially sharing malicious files with your meeting participants. Click here for information about how to manage in-meeting file transfers.
  6. Disable in-meeting chat. This will prevent a malicious attendee from harrassing other participants via Zoom's built-in chat client during a meeting. Click here for information on how to turn off in-meeting chat.
  7. Use Zoom's virtual waiting room feature. This allows the host to vet a guest before they are permitted to enter the actual meeting. Click here for more information about the Zoom waiting room.
  8. Lock the meeting. Once the meeting has started and you don't think anyone else is going to join, you can lock the meeting so that no one else can enter. Click here for more information on how to lock down a Zoom meeting.

 

What do I do if I think someone is Zoombombing my meeting?

If someone is being disruptive during a Zoom meeting or you just don't think they belong, there are a number of steps you can use to take back control over the meeting and limit that participant's involvement.

  1. Put them on hold. 
  2. Disable their audio.
  3. Disable their video.
  4. Disable their chat.
  5. Boot 'em.

 

What if none of the above is working?

There are instances where a "sophisticated" Zoombomber has intruded on a meeting and then re-joined it multiple times after being kicked out. This is done by utilizing multiple Zoom user accounts. There is also the potential for multiple Zoombombers inflitrating a meeting simultaneously if the meeting ID is shared publicly and there are no safeguards to prevent access. If either of these things are happening, it may be best to just end the meeting and create a new meeting with a different Zoom ID. When you invite your participants to the new Zoom meeting, utilize authentication and the other methods listed above to ensure that your bomber(s) can't strike again. 

Digital Engagement

Contact Us

306 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

Wes Summers
Digital Engagement Lead for Student Affairs
wsummers@uga.edu

Stan Jackson
Assistant to the Vice President for Communications, Data, and Technology
​ugastan@uga.edu

Experiential Learning

The University of Georgia's Experiential Learning Initiative provides students opportunities to connect their academic foundations to internships, research, service-learning, study abroad, and other forms of experiential learning. UGA Student Affairs actively contributes to the Experiential Learning Initiative by offering diverse learning opportunities built on the Division's learning strategy.

Currently, more than 60 Student Affairs programs have been approved for inclusion on the University's Experiential Learning transcript for their contributions to student development and growth. Assistant to the VP, Kara Fresk (kfresk@uga.edu), facilitates the Experiential Learning proposal and designation process for all departments within Student Affairs.


The University Curriculum Experiential Learning subcommittee reviews and approves programs based on the following criteria:

  1. Student engagement in the activity is equivalent to the time spent in a one-credit hour course (approximately 45 hours minimum, but other intensive activities may apply)
     
  2. Students engaged in the activity receive significant mentorship/advisement/supervision, training, and feedback from a qualified UGA Student Affairs staff member
     
  3. Participants engage in summative and significant reflection, discussion, evaluation, and/or an exit interview at the conclusion of the program
     
  4. The activity can be classified as a creative, global, internship, leadership, research, or service experience
     
  5. The activity has measurable student learning outcomes in two of the following areas: challenge, ownership, and self or social awareness
     

UGA Student Affairs employs a centralized approach to the Experiential Learning proposal and designation process.

  • Complete the Student Affairs Experiential Learning intake form
    • Submit any additional materials that may be helpful in the proposal submission process (e.g., applications, position descriptions, organization constitutions) to Kara Fresk.
    • Samples of completed intake forms may be found here: Internship    Leadership
       
  • Office of the VP staff will draft a formal Experiential Learning proposal, in collaboration with your department.

After receiving approval from the University Curriculum Experiential Learning subcommittee, EL activity directors are responsible for managing the EL-designated activity in accordance with both institutional and divisional expectations.

  • Before the Experiential Learning activity
    • Attend training for EnGAge Georgiathe online activity management tool employed by the Office of Experiential Learning
    • Verify all Experiential Learning program details are updated and correct in EnGAge Georgia
    • Add all anticipated participants to each EL program in EnGAge Georgia
       
  • During the Experiential Learning activity
    • Employ EnGAge Georgia as desired to manage student participation in the Experiential Learning activity
       
  • Following the Experiential Learning activity
    • Verify student participation/completion of requirements in EnGAge Georgia 

Creative

  • Introduction to Radio Broadcasting
  • Introduction to Yearbook Copywriting
  • Introduction to Yearbook Design
  • Introduction to Yearbook Photography

 

Global

  • Student Tour of Georgia

 

Internship

  • Aquatics Program Assistant
  • Competitive Sports Program Assistant
  • Dawg Camp Media Intern
  • Dean of Students Information Technology Assistant
  • Division of Student Affairs Employment Experience
  • Division of Student Affairs Internship
  • DRC Testing Assistant II/III
  • Facility Operations Program Assistant
  • Fitness Monitor Program Assistant
  • Group Fitness Program Assistant
  • Housing Social Media Ambassadors
  • International Student Life Student Employee
  • ISL Communications Intern
  • Office of Student Conduct Intern
  • Personal Training Program Assistant
  • Rec Sports Fellows Program
  • Recreational Sports Marketing Assistant
  • Senior World Leaders
  • Student Affairs Communications Internship
  • Student Affairs Communications Videography Internship
  • Student Affairs Media Assistant
  • Student Veterans Resource Center Intern
  • Sustainability Ambassadors
  • University Housing Video Producer
  • University Testing Services Student Intern

 

Leadership

  • BeYou Peer Educators
  • CLASS Advocate (CA)
  • Community Standards Board
  • Dawg Camp Counselor
  • EcoReps
  • EL EDGE Leadership Program
  • First-Year Programs Director
  • First-Year Programs Peer Leaders
  • Fontaine Peer Mentor Program
  • Healthy Dawg Ambassadors
  • Homecoming Executive Board
  • National Residence Hall Honorary Executive Board
  • New RA Training Seminar Program
  • Pandora Executive Board
  • Panhellenic Recruitment Counselor
  • Residence Hall Association Executive Board
  • Resident Assistant (RA)
  • RSVP Peer Educators
  • Student Health Advisory Committee
  • Student Leadership Experience: LGBTRC Ambassador Program
  • Sustainability Ambassadors
  • The Arch Society
  • The LeaderShape Institute
  • Transfer Student Experience Peer Mentor Program
  • UGA Miracle Executive Board
  • UGA Miracle Executive Council
  • University Judiciary
  • University Judiciary Executive Council
  • University Union Board of Directors
  • University Union Board of Directors Training
  • World Leaders
  • WUOG 90.5 Executive Board

 

Service

  • Disability Resource Center Speakers Bureau
  • EL EDGE Service Program
  • IMPACT Participants
  • IMPACT Site Leader Experience/Training
  • ServeUGA Service Ambassadors

Contact Us

Matt Waller
Chief of Staff, Student Affairs
mewaller@uga.edu

Student Affairs Learning Framework

Smiling students sitting together on some steps.

Engagement. Intellect. Character.

UGA Student Affairs fully embraces the University’s emphasis on rigorous learning experiences, hands-on research, and leadership opportunities. Some of the longest lasting impressions from UGA students’ college careers will be from their involvement with Student Affairs. Through our focus on the engagement, intellect and character of each student, we take great pride in the value that Student Affairs’ learning experiences add to a University of Georgia degree.

To guide our efforts with students, we have committed to a common learning framework, anchored in Engagement, Intellect, and Character and supported by their associated learning priorities. In all of the experiences we provide that facilitate student learning, this framework directs our work.  

Engagement

  • Civic Engagement – Individual and collective action designed to make a difference in our communities
  • Teamwork – Working effectively with others toward a shared goal
  • Inclusion – Examining and challenging behaviors that prevent full and equal participation of all people

Intellect

  • Critical Thinking – Logical and reflective thinking focused on deciding what to believe or do
  • Application of Knowledge – Meaningful use of ideas, experiences, and knowledge
  • Communication – Effective exchange of information in a variety of contexts

Character  

  • Ethical Reasoning – Examining coexisting personal and community values to guide our actions
  • Self-Identity – Understanding intersections of our identities, values, and abilities
  • Well-Being – Optimizing multiple dimensions of wellness to live a satisfying and productive life

Contact Us

Matt Waller
Chief of Staff, Student Affairs
mewaller@uga.edu

Essential Skills and Experiential Learning

Student Tour of Georgia Sea Dawg Class

At UGA, Student Affairs provides students with wide-ranging learning opportunities and coaching beyond the space of the classroom. Student Affairs staff facilitate learning for students in nearly 300 Student Affairs learning experiences and nearly 70 Experiential Learning activities. Student Affairs is committed to designing and facilitating these experiences from a learner-centered approach so that all students have the opportunity to learn and grow in multiple ways during their time at UGA.

Contact Us

Matt Waller
Chief of Staff, Student Affairs
mewaller@uga.edu

Participant Tracking & Scanning Devices

Students interacting with information tables in Tate Plaza.

UGA Student Affairs tracks student participation at division-sponsored events in order to evaluate these events’ contribution toward student success. Students’ information is protected and is only used for the purpose of enhancing the learning environment and supporting student success.

UGA Student Affairs departments facilitating programs or services for which they would like to collect a participant log can obtain access to codeREADr-enabled scanning devices to capture participant information. Student Affairs has five devices to lend departments and manages the process of entering events into the codeREADr system. As such, we are responsible for maintaining a protocol through which devices are loaned to departments and information is entered.


 

We've updated our request process!
Please read carefully below and contact us if you have any questions.

 

To request participant tracking devices, please follow these steps:

  1. Visit the UGA Involvement Network

     
  2. Click "Sign In" in the upper right hand corner and complete the CAS login process.  



     
  3. Once logged in, click on the tiled button in the upper right corner and select "Manage."







     
  4. In the “My Memberships” section, click on your membership, or the group/membership that will be associated with the event that you wish to create, then click on the menu button next to the Membership title – this will bring up a sidebar. If you do not have any memberships assigned to you, contact involvement@uga.edu.














     

This process will add your event to the UGA Involvement Network, as well as to the Student Affairs event calendar. Following your submission, we will contact you to confirm your request for participant tracking devices within five business days. 


Once you have submitted your event:

  1. We will contact you to confirm your request for participant tracking devices within five business days.
  2. Pick up the devices prior to your event. Student workers, student leaders, and staff members from your department may pick up the devices.
    • We will provide training for use of the tracking devices as needed.
  3. Return the devices by 4:00 pm on the next business day following your event.
    • If you need the devices for longer, please contact us to make arrangements. You may be asked to return devices sooner depending on the volume of events.
    • We will send a link to an updated participant log (names and emails of attendees/participants) within five (5) business days of your event.

Please note the following:

  • We require a minimum of five (5) business days to complete your event and scanner request intake..
  • Requests for access to scanning devices for events related to student fees or for which there is an exchange or collection of money should be directed to the Tate Business Office at (706) 542-8514. Requests should be made no later than one week prior to the event.

 

For more detailed instructions regarding the submission process, please see the link below.

UGA Involvement Network

Event Registration Instructions

Contact Us

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602


Stan Jackson
Assistant to the Vice President for
Communications, Data, and Technology
​ugastan@uga.edu

Resources for Checkout

Resource Library

Learning and Strategic Initiatives has a variety of physical resources in our office for check out, including books, equipment, and software.

Please feel free to browse our resource library or contact Jennifer Erickson-Brown at lsi@uga.edu if you would like to check out any of our available resources!

Here are some quick and easy steps on how to use UGA’s new library database.

 

How to Register

1. Sign up for a lilbib account. This will only take a few minutes and once it’s done, you’ll never have to do it again. Start by visiting www.libib.com. Type in your first and last name, your desired username, your email address, and your password. (Note: This does not have to be your UGA email and password) Then click “Start My Library” at the bottom of the screen.

2. After you’ve logged in, click on the blue person icon located in the upper right hand corner of the screen to add friends.

3. Underneath where it says “Find Friends” type “LSIUGA” into the text box.

4. Click the “Follow” button beneath the lsiuga.libib.com link.

 

How to Place Holds on Books, Software, or Office Equipment

If You Are Trying To Place A Hold For The First Time

1. Log into your libib account (after you’ve selected LSIUGA as a user to follow, see “How to Register” for instructions on how to follow us) and click on “Following” on the upper right-hand corner of the page.

2. Click on the lsiuga.libib.com link.

3. If you want to find books, software, or office equipemnt, click on the “LSI Resource Library” button.

You can search for the item you're interested in by:

  • Alphabetical order
  • Tag List
  • Directly Typing Title Into the Search Box

4. Once you have found the item(s) you wish to check out, click on the lock icon beneath the book picture to place a hold on your desired item(s).  If you have a token (an assigned password which is different than your login password) already, type in your email and token. If you do not already have a token, click on the “need token?” button. Type in your email address and a token will be sent to you.

5. Once you have received a token, type in token and email address to place a hold on your items.

Congrats! Your item(s) are now on hold for you!

If You Are Not a First Time User

1. Log into your libib account (after you’ve selected LSIUGA as a user to follow, see “How to Register” for instructions on how to follow us) and click on “Following” on the upper right-hand corner of the page.

2. Click on the lsiuga.libib.com link.

3. If you want to find books, software, or office equipemnt, click on the “LSI Resource Library” button.

You can search for the item you're interested in by:

  • Alphabetical order
  • Tag List
  • Directly Typing Title Into the Search Box

4. Once you have found the item(s) you wish to check out, click on the lock icon beneath the book picture to place a hold on your desired item(s). If you have a token (an assigned password which is different than your login password) already, type in your email and token. If you do not already have a token, click on the “need token?” button. Type in your email address and a token will be sent to you.

5. Once you have received token, type in token and email address to place a hold on your items.

Congrats! Your item(s) are now on hold for you!

 

How to Receive Your Item(s)

1. Come by Learning and Strategic Initiatives! We are located in Memorial Hall Room 408 and open 8am-5pm, M-F.

Resource Library

Staff Resources & Business Affairs

Professional Award Opportunities

In the spirit of promoting the impact of UGA Student Affairs departments and staff, Learning and Strategic Initiatives has compiled a list of award and recognition opportunities from professional organizations related to student affairs. LSI recognizes this is not an exhaustive list and welcomes the contribution of additional award opportunities, as we make regular updates to this document. Staff are encouraged to review the document and showcase the excellent work of UGA Student Affairs by nominating a colleague, department, or program.

 

Professional Award Writing

- Submission deadlines can sneak up, therefore consider timetables far in advance

- Ensure that you include direct examples addressing each aspect of the award criteria/rubric within the description of the initiative/program you are submitting

- Concisely state the entire narrative by emphasizing important details and omitting nonessential details

- Maintain focus on how the initiative/program created a meaningful experience for students

- Invite members of the Division of Student Affairs to review your proposal

- Notify Learning & Strategic Initiatives and Communications & Marketing Initiatives of your submission

- Be proud of the work other members of the Division of Student Affairs have done and don’t sell your and/or your colleagues’ efforts short

- Visit the Learning and Strategic Initiatives website to see what professional association’s awards align with the initiative/program you intend to submit

- Recruit members of the Division of Student Affairs to write letters of support (number of letters of support needed will vary based on award)

- Letters of support should all share different aspects of the ways the initiative/ program fostered student learning and brought value to the campus community

- A compelling/comprehensive understanding of why the initiative/program deserves to be considered for the award

- Remember, the individuals evaluating your submission are not familiar with UGA or the Division of Student Affairs, so provide plenty of context

- Both qualitative and quantitative data to show how the initiative/program impacted UGA students

- Student testimonials depicting how this initiative/program affected them

- Usage of Assessment Data

* What were your intended learning outcomes?
* To what extent/how were your intended learning outcomes met?
* If applicable, in what way(s) did your initiative/program stand out in comparison to previous attempts and/or years?

- Articulate how student development, involvement, and learning occurred

- Highlight relevant theory utilized when creating the initiative/program

- If applicable, demonstrate evidence of institutional partnerships

- Convey systems established to secure the sustainability of the initiative/program

 


Click here to view a list of award opportunities.

Professional Award Opportunities

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Data Requests

Conference attendees doing assessment.

The Office of the VP processes data requests for UGA Student Affairs employees who need access to information for business purposes, including data related to student demographics, contact information, academic performance, term information, academic details, pre-enrollment information, and student engagement. Faculty and students requesting data from UGA Student Affairs for research purposes must submit a UGA Student Affairs Research Request.

  1. We require a minimum of seven business days to complete data requests.
  2. Requests for access to data in the Student Affairs Data Block must demonstrate a legitimate educational purpose or business need to know.
  3. We reserve the right to withhold data for students who have placed restrictions on their personal information.
  4. Data Users must agree to comply with the Student Affairs Data Block Policy.
  5. Updated data for each semester is available approximately three weeks after the beginning of the semester. We will confirm that the requested data are available for the desired semester. We cannot, for example, provide currently enrolled data for the spring 2020 semester in December 2019. To provide the most accurate data for spring 2020 enrollment, we would wait until at least three weeks into the spring semester to provide the demographics of students enrolled for spring semester.

Requests for access to data contained in the Student Affairs Data Block must be submitted via the Student Affairs Data Block Access Request Form. Click here to preview the intake fields.

Student Affairs Data Block Policy

Student Affairs Data Block
Access Request Form

Contact Us

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602


Stan Jackson
Assistant to the Vice President for
Communications, Data, and Technology
​ugastan@uga.edu

Assessment and Research Support

Inquiry is a vital part of the work we do in UGA Student Affairs and the University of Georgia. To this end, the Office of the VP is pleased to consult with staff in UGA Student Affairs on assessment and research projects. Assessment projects include any effort to collect, analyze, and interpret data to determine effectiveness of programs or services. Research projects include any effort to collect, analyze, and interpret data to guide theoretical foundations; the scope of research is broader than a single program or service.

Our approach to consulting is informed by our guiding values of integrity, excellence, accountability, and respect. We strive to educate and empower our colleagues and clients throughout the consultation process. We will offer guidance, feedback, and technical assistance; this will equip you with the necessary skills to design and complete your project.

To begin the consultation process, complete the online Student Affairs Assessment and Research Consultation form.

Assessment and Research Consultation Form

Contact Us

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602


Stan Jackson
Assistant to the Vice President for
Communications, Data, and Technology
​ugastan@uga.edu

Staff Development Consulting

Continued development is vital to the growth and work we do in UGA Student Affairs. Student Affairs Staff Development is pleased to consult with Student Affairs departments to design professional and skill development opportunities that address department-specific needs.

Our approach to consulting is informed by our guiding values of integrity, excellence, accountability, and respect. We strive to educate and empower our colleagues and clients throughout the consultant process. We will offer guidance, feedback, and technical assistance; this will equip you with the necessary skills to design and complete your project.

To begin the consultation process, complete the online Student Affairs Staff Development Consulting request form.

Staff Development Consultation

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

2019-2020 Staff Development Workshops

Student standing in front of a wall covered in sticky notes.

2019-2020 Staff Development Workshops

"Stronger Together: Exploring Team Strengths"

This year’s staff development workshop features a curriculum designed for staff to explore what makes them great!

 

Building on the foundaction of the 2018-2019 "Discovering Your Strengths" workshops, the workshops for the 2019-2020 academic calendar will provide staff the space to explore their individual results from CliftonStrengths StrengthsQuest self-assessment and how their Strengths influence their team dynamic. Whether it is working on a project together or how colleagues communicate with one another, this workshop will be designed to provide groups of staff that work with each other daily an opportunity to dialogue how their unique talents influence their work. Your department's point of contact will be asked to assist staff in Student Affairs Staff Development with the coordination of workshop scheduling and logistics. If you have a member of your team that has yet to complete the CliftonStrengths Assessment or would like to request an additional workshop for your team, please contact us at ugasastaff@uga.edu.

 

Gallup recommends that your first time taking the CliftonStrengths StrengthsQuest (also known as "StrengthsFinder") self-assessment is likely the most accurate results possible. If you have not completed the self-assessment before, you will have the opportunity to complete it prior to your selected workshop session.  

 

If you have already taken CliftonStrengths StrengthsQuest, you will submit your Top 5 StrengthsQuest Themes when registering for the workshop. If you do not recall your Top 5 Strengths Themes, please head to www.strengthsquest.com and follow the prompts to request your username and password. You can also call Gallup at 1-888-211-4049 or email them at strengthsquest@gallup.com for assistance.

 

Have questions about CliftonStrengths StrengthsFinder or the workshops? Contact us at ugasastaff@uga.edu or (706) 542-8229

Interested in learning more about
the Workshop Facilitation Team?

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Staff Development Workshop Facilitation Team

Do you want to gain facilitation experience?

Passionate about Gallup’s StrengthsFinder or want to learn more about it?

Have an interest in contributing to the growth and development of other staff in the Division?

Thank you for your interest in serving on the 2019-2020 Staff Development Workshop Facilitation Team.

Applications are currently closed.

Check back at this webpage for next year's application and deadlines. 


Apply to be a part of an incredible professional development opportunity, the UGA Student Affairs Workshop Facilitation Team!  This year’s Staff Development Workshops will utilize CliftonStrengths StrengthsFinder self-assessment to provide staff the space to explore how their strengths and unique qualities influence their work and work with others. Staff will examine their StrengthsFinder results with one another while connecting with colleagues from across the Division. See below for more information about the requirements, eligibility, and application. 


Student Affairs Workshop Facilitation Team Member Requirements

  • Term: Team members will serve a one academic year term, ending in May 2020.
  • Training: Team members will attend one 4-hour training. Training date will be determined after selection of the Workshop Facilitation Team.
  • Biweekly Meetings: Team members will attend a 1-hour meeting every other week. Meeting day and time will be determined after selection of the Workshop Facilitation Team.
  • Workshop Facilitation: Team members will facilitate a minimum of 5 workshops between November 2019 and April 2020. Team members can expect to allocate approximately 1.5 hours for each workshop. Team members will select workshop days and times based on availability.

Workshop Facilitation Team Eligibility

Team members must:

  • Be a full-time staff member in UGA Student Affairs.
  • Have supervisor approval to join the Workshop Facilitation Team.
  • Be available to attend training, participate in biweekly meetings, and facilitate a minimum of 5 workshops.

Workshop Facilitation Team Applications

  • Applicants are expected to have a conversation with their supervisor about volunteering to be a facilitator prior to applying. Applicants will be asked to upload a signed letter of support from their supervisor (link below).
  • Applications must be submitted via the Qualtrics form. All fields are required. Please prepare content for each of the following prompts prior to visiting the proposal submission form.

 

To indicate your interest in serving as a member of the Workshop Facilitation Team, complete the application found at the link block below.

Please review the Application Guidelines prior to completing your application, including review of the Supervisor Approval Form.

 

Facilitation Team Application Guidelines

Supervisor Approval Form

Collective Coaching Circle for Supervisors

Are you seeking opportunities to improve as a supervisor? 

Interested in professional development designed to grow your supervisory skills?

Want to expand your network among other supervisors through the Division of student Affairs?

 

Consider applying to be a part of the first Collective Coaching Circle for Supervisors!

Applications will be accepted until March 16th at 12:00pm.


A Collective Coaching Circle is an opportunity for supervisors to gain professional development through peer coaching. Peer Coaching takes place through conversations between colleagues as they individually and collectively reflect on their professional practices, share ideas, and gain knowledge to overcome supervisory obstacles.

The Division of Student Affairs is creating two Coaching Circles: one for supervisors of full-time employees and another for supervisors of student staff. If either of these describes your role, please consider applying for a Collective Coaching Circle!

Applications will be reviewed in consideration of availability and qualifications, with respect to diverse experiences.


Collective Coaching Circle Participant Benefits

  • Expand your knowledge on leadership and coaching, strengthen management skills, and overcome supervisory obstacles!
  • Between sessions, participants will have the opportunity to develop their supervisory skills by actively practicing coaching techniques in the workplace.
  • Join fellow Student Affairs colleagues across the division to connect, grow, and experience diverse professional and supervisory styles!

 

Collective Coaching Circle Participant Requirements

  • Term: Participants will commit to attending a two-hour meeting, once per month, from April 2020 to September 2020.
  • Preparedness: In order to fully enagage in each session, participants will complete all preparation documents and review materials prior to all meetings.
  • Coaching Format: Participants will adhere to the guidelines for group coaching conversations.

 

Collective Coaching Eligibility

  • Team members must:
    • Be a full-time staff member in UGA Student Affairs.
    • Directly supervise at least one full-time staff member or student employee.
    • Obtain supervisor approval to join the Collective Coaching Circle.

 

Collective Coaching Circle Applications

  • Applicants are expected to have a conversation with their supervisor about participating in the Collective coaching Circle prior to applying.
    • Applicants will be asked to upload a signed letter of support from their supervisor (link below) as part of their application.
  • Applications must be submitted via the Qualtrics form. All fields are required. Please prepare content for each of the following prompts prior to visiting the proposal submission form. Click here to view the application questions. 

 

To indicate your interest participating in a Collective coaching Circle for Supervisors, complete the application found at the link block below.

Collective Coaching Circle for Supervisors: Application

Collective Coaching Circle for Supervisors Application Questions

Collective Coaching Circle for Supervisors- Supervisor Approval Form

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Staff Engagement During the COVID-19 Crisis

Growing and Working Together in New Ways

The experience of working remotely, particularly as part of a traditional, campus-based team, likely presents a new challenge for most Student Affairs staff. This is new ground…or space…for all of us. Clearly these are unprecedented times, and for staff at all levels, like students, it can feel overwhelming. For many of us, the foreseeable future will require exeedingly high levels of adaptability, understanding, and learning on the fly.

We hope you find this unofficial, informal guidance to be a great starting point as we work together to support each other, create new ideas, and tap into resources. Below you will find links to upcoming professional development opportunities and resources, as well as a few questions to consider as you transition from working remotely to returning to campus. As of August 10, all staff will have returned to campus so it is essential you familiarize yourself with the coronavirus.uga.edu website to stay up to date with University procedures.

For supervisors, we recognize the distance may have not helped with the balance of supporting your team and ensuring the best continuity for students. This resource is not intended to be a directive. Think of this as a starting point - a primer for your plan to support your team as you re-envision how leadership, mentorship, workflow, supervision, and interactions evolve to succeed in the online space. 

We will continue to add resources, examples, and best practices in the coming days as we learn more. Feel free to share your ideas, examples, and questions with us at jcrawford@uga.edu or ugasastaff@uga.edu. We look forward to seeing you on our next Zoom!

 


 

Digital Dialogues

Download of the Day

Scheduled intermittently, staff will be able to participate in 30 to 60 minute Zoom professional development webinars. All staff are welcome to participate and are encouraged to attend, just make sure to register before the session so we know to expect you! To register, head over to the Staff Development calendar and click the "Regsiter" button. Have questions about a particular session? Want to present on some material? Contact James Crawford in the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs via email at jcrawford@uga.edu.

 

Drop-ins

Are you building out a digital "team retreat" to help welcome new hires to your department? Are you looking for someone to lead a discussion in your next Zoom staff meeting? Whether it is a quick Zoom chat or a half-day digital retreat, we would love to help support you!

Contact James Crawford in the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs (jcrawford@uga.edu) to schedule a time to review your preferred outcomes, expectations, and any considerations for the drop-in. From there, James will work in partnership with you to build and deliver material designed to meet outcomes and encourage the continual development of your team. 

 


Now What?

This section includes additional considerations and questions related to working remotely and the phased return to campus.

I am returning, or have returned, to working on campus. What all do I have to do?

  • Connect with your supervisor to review any specific guidelines or modifications that are needed for your workplace. This could include maintaining recommended guidelines of social distance, donning a mask in your workplace, and location of sanitation stations. 
  • Please ensure that you have completed the required staff training module available at pep.uga.edu prior to your return to campus. This training is in addition to the supervisor module (as applicable).
  • Along with faculty, students, and visitors, you are now required to wear an appropriate face covering while inside campus facilities and buildings where six feet social distancing may not always be possible. You should have been supplied two face coverings and a digital thermometer by the university. On your return, please let your supervisor know if you have not received these.

  • It is critical that you follow guidelines issued by the GDPH, CDC, USG, and UGA to contain the spread of the coronavirus. Please educate yourself on best practices and the many safety precautions being taken by the university, as well as available resources provided. If you have questions or feel there are areas that need to be addressed further, please let us know.

If I have additional questions, where do I go?

 

Where do I start? What should I be doing?

Although it is likely that you know yourself, your team, and the team's working relationship(s) with each other pretty well, uncertainty and change can open up new doors. This is an opportunity to revisit past expectations with one another while also creating new expectations that support the transition to remote work. Your first step is to develop expectations with your staff and your supervisor. Below are some sample questions help you get started in your transition to work remotely. Remember, these are just examples and starter questions to help you and your team members establish realistic expectations for productivity and support. 

Questions to consider asking your supervisor:

  • How should I keep you updated on what I am working on?
  • What should my work schedule look like?
  • When do you need my task/project list? 

Questions to consider asking your team (group):

  • What are the team's preferred ways to keep each other updated on projects?
  • What should be our primary ways for communicating? What are our expectations for responding? (e.g., immediate to texts, Microsoft Office 365 Team chats when you get to them, etc.)
  • What expectations do you have for one another? 
  • What expectations do you collectively have of me as your supervisor?
  • What would be reasonable expectations for me to have of the team?

Questions to consider asking individual team members:

  • Working remotely can make people feel like they are "out of the loop" a lot more. What are things you want me to make sure I touch base with you about so you feel connected?
  • How are you managing all of this transition and shifting of work?
    • What might be one or two ways I can help you be as productive as possible?
  • What is your preferred way that I check in with you to see how your work project/task list is going? 
    • Would you prefer we touch base every day? At the beginning of the week? As needed?
  • What expectations do you have for me as your supervisor?

 

How do I know I’m being productive?

This is a great opportunity for you to revisit your own personal definition of productivity. Establish your own personal metrics for productivity. Does it vary from project-to-project? Does it tie into specific goals you have in mind? What feedback might your supervisor have? Working remotely requires us to, at times, re-wire how we feel productive in our work. Sometimes it is completing a tangible item like a project or report. Other times, it is all of the steps taken to have that 30-minute Zoom meeting go fluidly. It is all about accomplishment, not activity. 

 

I feel like I am out of the loop. How can I know what is going on? 

We recommend you follow the various University forms of social media and continue checking your email. Considering there are so many forms of communication going out, we recommend you establish some personal plans to reduce email fatigue. Most communication on behalf of the Division will come from the Administrative Team member or from a Leadership Team member. Now, more than ever, it is important to check in with your supervisor on a more frequent basis since information and solutions are ever evolving. 

 

I feel powerless through all of this. What can I do to help? 

Our initial recommendation, if it is within your position responsibilities, is to connect with students you directly advise/supervise and to check in on them. Perhaps it is reminding them of big ideas they had when they first stepped into their job or leadership position. Maybe it is reminding them to sign up for academic advising appointments or register for classes.

  • Check back in on the Digital Engagement during the COVID-19 Crisis page to share any articles, online learning resources, or additional links that students might like to have.
  • In addition to supporting students, be proactive in developing and communicating your remote work task list.
    • Share your task list with your supervisor. Determine a way that works for both you to stay up to date on progress.
  • Follow-up with your supervisor to see if there are any projects or tasks that might need your assistance.
  • Do some "spring-cleaning." Clean up your email inbox or organize your department's shared drive. Consolidate files to enhance productivity while working remotely. 

 

This feels lonely. Where is my team?

Regardless of department size, social distancing can create, well, distance. Working remotely removes the opportunity for personal interactions. Moments of genuine connection and interaction can be difficult to replicate in the online space. Connect with your supervisor and your team to develop a communication plan that promotes productivity without losing the human element. Using these digital tools to maintain connection can be tricky because it is likely, for most of us, a glimpse into the work life and home life of our coworkers. 

  • Set up a 10-minute Zoom meeting or conference call for the beginning or end of the workday to just check in on one another.
  • Use a music streaming service to build an office playlist where your team compiles some tunes to listen to together.
  • Start off a staff meeting doing a "show and tell" of your pets, a family heirloom, favorite book, or even awkward photos from your high school yearbook. 
  • Determine what support looks like for you and your team members. Everyone handles change and transition differently. Some may be content with working remote while others might feel lost.
    • If you have additional questions or concerns, check out the UGA HR Well-Being site for various emotional and physical health resources.

 

What do I need to know as a supervisor?

An ArchNews announcement sent on March 17, 2020 called for supervisors to be as flexible as possible with work from home assignments. How can you appropriately manage your teams from a distance? The shift from seeing each other five days a week to now seeing them from the other side of a screen can be quite a dramatic shift. Below are a few ways to help lead your team through this time of uncertainty and transition.

  • Be intentional and make personal connections. Set aside time in your meeting agendas to check in on how the team is doing. Something as quick and simple like asking them to start the meeting by saying three words that describe how they are feeling before you dive into the work discussion.
  • Establish clear expectations. What are the guidelines for work? When should they update you on projects?
  • Plan to communicate. Develop a communication strategy and structure for your department and another one for your team. Would you prefer they respond to emails within 24 hours and texts within 5 hours? Consider the total "bandwidth" your team can handle.
  • Invite your team in to help with projects (where appropriate). A way to combat the distance is inviting the team into projects or tasks that you are working on. Perhaps they have new ideas or this is an opportunity to delegate tasks and encourage collaboration.
  • Keep a pulse on how your team is managing stress. Everyone handles times of stress differently. If staff morale or behavior tends to change, consider reminding staff of various resources available via USG Well-being. 
  • Honesty and vunerability can build teams up in times of uncertainty. Once you have established a comfortable rapport with your team, it is alright to admit you don't have all the answers. In unprecedented times such as these, it would be difficult to expect supervisors to have all of the answers. There is incredible power in the phrase of "I don't know but we can find it out together" or "While we might not have all the answers right now, one thing I do know is how resilient our team is together."

 

How else might I engage staff during this time?

  • For those employees with specific technical skills, provide opportunities to brush up on specific job requirements or take an online certification course for your area of expertise.
  • Find specific online classes related to the department, TedTalks, or YouTube topics. Use those as content to have the employee watch and provide a short essay about how it applies to their job duties and responsibilities.
  • Pick an online class, TedTalk, podcast episode, or some other form of digital learning and attend the course or watch the video together. Hold a discussion with your team to discuss connections between the material and your collective work.  
  • Assign a special project(s). These could be projects that have been “on the radar” for a while now, but for a variety of reasons, have not been tackled yet. For example, developing a new function-specific training program for your department to help cross-train staff.
  • Review departmental policies to make sure they are current.
  • Develop or review standard operating procedures and identify opportunities for process improvements.
  • Continue conducting regular online work.
  • Complete annual review if not completed at this time.

 

What about student staff?

An added challenge for our "new normal" of working remotely is identifying remote work for student employees. Develop a list of projects and times for your to teach them on how to assist with the projects remotely. Develop a way to check in on them via a Zoom meeting. Consider using your meetings with them as small focus groups to gather their insight and feedback on how a new initiative or idea may work. Below are few ideas to help develop and maintain productivity with student staff. Continue to check back in at this page as we continue to learn new ways departments are engaging their student staff. 

  • Benchmarking and Data Collection
    • Examine what peer and aspirant institutions are providing around a specific subject matter.
    • Research new ideas, concepts, programmatic areas of interest, opportunities for the department to grow, etc.
    • Survey or interview friends and other peers to explore areas of opportunity.
  • Digital Enhancement
    • Review department website to update contact information, services provided, and identify outdated information.
    • Perform an audit of the department website to ensure the site structure communicates information, services, and resources effectively with site visitors.
    • Develop a social media engagement plan.
    • Create videos, articles, or other media to assist with digital student engagement.
  • Materials Review and Creation
    • Create or update onboarding manuals, training manuals, transition guides, etc.
    • Review and update electronic version of printed materials (e.g., pamphlets, flyers, information sheets)
  • Idea and Solutions Generation
    • Work in teams (virtually) to develop solutions to improve work productivity.
    • Develop a recommendation plan around a particular area of operation, unexplored opportunity, or “work challenge” that culminates in a presentation for the department. Provide a template for how to report on the solution.  

 

What if I could use more help? 

Perhaps you would like to hold a digital team retreat or examine how some department initiatives connect to the 2025 Strategic Plan. Whether you need a few minutes to bounce some ideas off of someone, need someone to build a digital retreat or workshop for your unit, or would like someone to lead a breakout session for your team, the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs is here to support you. You can contact us at ugasastaff@uga.edu

Resources for Staff

Stay Informed

Professional Development


Digital Resources for Staff

COVID-19 Resources


Communication Resources

Social Media Graphics and Video 

Resources for Supervision/Project Management


Other University of Georgia and Athens Resources 

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Staff Spotlights: Worth VanLinden

Worth VanLinden           

Coordinator for Greek Housing Management - University Housing/Greek Life

Achiever - Discipline - Consistency - Futuristic - Context


 

Worth was nominated for a Staff Spotlight by a colleague through the Staff Spotlight Nomination Form. To nominate a colleague for a future Staff Spotlight, click here. Worth’s nominator wrote:

Here are a few reasons the Greek Life staff would like to recognize Worth and why we'd like more colleagues in the Division of Student Affairs to get to know him:

In the brief time I have had the opportunity to work with Worth, I have appreciated his positive attitude and ability to bring that [positivity] to any situation and/or interaction. Not one to brag, Worth is the type of individual who will constantly surprise you as you learn more about his experiences. I hope that others in Student Affairs have the opportunity to get to know him.

I think Worth has been such a positive addition, not only to the Greek Life team, but also to the division. Worth’s expertise from his time Athletics has really helped with managing our on-campus chapter facilities with ease. He’s a pleasure to work and interact with.

Worth is great because he has a unique sense of humor that will always brighten your day. He is always willing to lend a helping hand to anyone in need. He has made me feel welcome in the office since day one. Everyone should know about Worth because he has a way of making an average day turn into an awesome day.

He enjoys eating raw Brussels sprouts; his office is officially known as ‘the Think Tank’ because of all the ideas he comes up with in his conversations. He’s been a bar-back, sold sneakers, and managed operations for Athletics. Most importantly, Herschel Walker requests him (and only him) by name to escort him during athletic events. He is truly the diamond the Division of Student Affairs never knew it needed.

  

Hi, Worth! Where do you call home?

 

I grew up in Jasper, a town located in Pickens County. It’s a wonderful, small town in the Blue Ridge Mountains.

 

If you went to college, where did you go?

 

I am a graduate of UGA with a degree in Consumer Economics from the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. As a kid, I grew up thinking that I would end up going to Georgia Tech or Georgia. Both institutions have a long history with my family. My grandfather used to live in a house very close to Georgia Tech’s campus, and grew up attending football and basketball games with my Grandma when they were first dating. Spending that much time with them in Georgia Tech’s backyard kind of made it a natural occurrence to lean towards going to school there one day.

 

Sounds like you might have switched allegiances over time. What’s the story behind that?

 

You could say that. In about 2002, I was really sick during Thanksgiving Break and was watching the Georgia vs. Georgia Tech game as I was trying to recover from the flu. Georgia was having a historic season and I still can remember watching a play where JT Wall, a transfer running back, was practically dragging Georgia Tech players. I still get chills thinking about it. I still remember downloading the UGA fight song on my phone and having the volume set on loud when nobody was around and would just let it ring over and over again (laughs). I was hooked. I couldn’t help but think, “Wouldn’t it be cool to go to school there and hear that song as you are walking to class or in the stadium?

 

How did the family react to your new allegiances?

 

Most were fine with it and understood. It’s just one of those things that elicits some jokes back and forth every now and again. But, I will say, you can bet that I had my phone on silent during family holidays for a little while [laughs].

 

What is it like working at the school that you went to for your undergraduate degree? Did you work on campus at all during your time here?

 

At one point in undergrad, I used to work at a Sunglass Hut and remember feeling like I was missing out on what all was going on here on campus. As someone that loves history, there is so much to learn about this university and all that has happened in its storied past, so I was committed to finding a job on campus that would allow for me to weave UGA throughout all aspects of my life. I ended up applying to work at Ramsey Student Center and the rest is history. I got a chance to be involved in so much. Academics always came first for me, but if I wasn’t studying, I was at Ramsey or trying out different student activities. Whether it was being a part of Spike Squad or helping with UGA Heroes, I feel like I always had a chance to learn more and more about UGA and myself.

 

What is something that you would like other staff to know about you?

 

While I love UGA, I know that it always has room to improve. If people know fun facts about the school, I’d love to hear them because, like I said, I love history and hearing about the unique moments that have been a part of this school’s past. Generally, I’m a pretty private and quiet guy so that might come across a little standoffish, but I assure you that I love talking to people. I love hearing about what they do, what they want out of life, and what their story is — I feel like I can talk about anything with anyone. I feel like I am a really good listener and enjoy hearing people’s thoughts and perspectives on things.

 

What would be something other staff could partner with you and your department on?

 

With regards to partnering with me specifically, I am always looking for new ideas and ways to invest in the student leaders that manage the historical spaces they live in as part of Greek Park. I like to connect with the students to get an idea about what their plan is for maintaining and organizing their physical spaces, but also for ways to help them grow by getting an idea for what they are hoping to invoke. If there are resources that people would like me to connect with the house managers, I would love to connect with staff about it. As for our office, I think there are plenty of ways, but think that our incoming Director has a lot of ideas already for opportunities to connect and partner with other departments.

 

Do you have any advice for new or current staff?

 

Don’t stop being curious and showing the initiative to ask questions. I think I have seen a lot of growth, personally, by putting myself out there to connect with people when I could just focus on my to-do list.  When I was in school, I was playing basketball and saw a staff member’s door was open and I walked over to tell him how much I loved spending time at Ramsey and asked if there were any jobs available. One and a half years later, I was helping set up things at the Intramural Fields and was also working with Athletics because of various ideas that I had.

 

That’s another piece of advice. If you have an idea, share it. You never know if that idea is the missing piece to a puzzle. There’s something incredible about “let’s see what happens” when it works out. It also helps people see that to you, you value your work more than “just” a program or an event or a service you are providing. There’s a level of investment there that you are always thinking [about].

 

What’s the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

 

I would say getting to be a December graduate at UGA and to be a First Honor Graduate. It was a great feeling to be able to walk in with Administration and take our seats. They sit the parents in a particular section and when the student’s name is called the parents will stand up. I am lucky to where I have two groups of family, sitting in the same section near one another. When my name was called as a recipient for the Bill and June Flatt Award in Family and Consumer Sciences, it was incredible to look back at both sets of parents and see them beaming with pride. In that moment I feel how important all of my time as an undergraduate was to them. My hard work meant a lot to them and it was a really cool moment.

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Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Staff Spotlights: Carolyn Arnold

Carolyn Arnold

Assistant Director for Disability Services - Disability Resource Center


As we continue to highlight staff nominated for Student Affairs Awards, we’re recognizing Carolyn Arnold, who was nominated for the 2019 Commitment to Excellence Award. Carolyn’s nominator wrote the following:

 

While I have only had the chance of working with her for the past three years, I recognize the long lasting impact she has had with the students that she works with (I'm not sure what number that would equate to over almost 19 years, perhaps thousands?), her colleagues, and the university community. The connections that Carolyn has built across campus (within the division of Student Affairs and beyond) have helped pave the way to ensure that students with psychological disabilities and autism spectrum disorder have an inclusive learning environment and campus experience. Carolyn is a wealth of knowledge, ideas, and creative solutions. She strives to make everyone welcome and valued!

 

Hi, Carolyn! Are you from Athens or Georgia? What led you UGA?

 

I grew up around Atlanta, and moved to Athens in 1994 after attending Young Harris College (a two year college at the time) in Young Harris, Georgia. Most people who graduated from Young Harris College transferred to UGA. My mother received her Ed.s from UGA and my brothers graduated from UGA, so it’s sort of a family thing. I received my BSW and MSW from UGA, and soon after graduating became a Licensed Master Social Worker (LMSW).

 

Have you worked at UGA the whole time you’ve lived here?

 

No. I received my MSW with a focus on Child Welfare from UGA and worked at the Department of Family and Children Services in the Child Protective Unit for approximately six months after graduating (I did my internship there and was hired after graduating). I learned a lot from the job, and enjoyed certain aspects of [it], but I knew that I did not nor could I do that type of work for much longer. I became aware of the job opening at the DRC and applied because you can say I had a calling to this type of work.

 

When I was younger, I was diagnosed with Dyslexia and ADHD and was fortunate enough to attend the Schenck School, a school in the Atlanta area for language disabilities. My first grade teacher made such an impact on me I knew then I wanted to work with students with disabilities. She actually hired me to work at Schenck during the summer when I was a freshman and sophomore in college. I love to tell this story…there was a student that I worked with during the summer at Schenck who came to UGA and it turned out that I was her coordinator during her time at UGA.  Anyway, I have been at the DRC since 2000.

 

Is there anything you’d like to share with staff so they can learn a little bit more about you?

 

Well, most people know that I love coffee, mainly because I need the caffeine, but also just because I love a good cup of coffee. I also enjoy shopping, reading, cooking, and listening to music. I met my husband at Young Harris College and we have three boys ranging in age from 7-13 (the real reason I love coffee).

 

What is something about your position or the work done by Disability Resource Center that you would like other staff to know?

 

There is quite a bit to share about how complex the process of determining and implementing academic accommodations can be. Students might have the same disability, but the disability can impact each student in a different way, so there are not set accommodations based solely on the disability. Our work requires us to not only be well versed in policy and procedure, but we also have to learn how to navigate many moving parts between the student, staff/faculty, and sometimes the student’s parents/legal guardian. It is a delicate balance.

 

It feels like your work is incredibly rewarding and could be quite challenging all at once. What would be a challenge that others might not realize about the work?

 

The work we do is incredibly rewarding because we get to know our students in a way that other faculty/staff do not. The process of determining appropriate accommodations is not black and white, and often requires thinking outside of the box which at times can be challenging. Many students do not want to register with our office because they feel like they are receiving special treatment. I try to explain to students that the accommodations are set in place to level the playing field and to help them achieve their fullest potential.  

 

What do you like most about working here or living in Athens?

 

I think the thing I like most about working here is being able to watch students achieve their goals. As an Assistant Director, I do not work directly with as many students as I did when I was a coordinator, but I always said that I loved the fact that I would see first or even second year students on a regular basis, but barely saw them during their third or fourth year. The thing I loved about that was that if we did not have regular contact it meant that they found their way and they learned how to “advocate” for themselves which was my goal. I guided them in how to handle certain situations when it came to what they needed in terms of their disability and they ran with it. When I was a student at UGA I received services from the DRC, and my coordinator, Margaret Totty, did the same for me so I guess you can say I am paying it forward. What do I like about Athens? I like the small town feel that Athens has while still being close to the Atlanta area, the mountains, and the beach.

 

Do you have any advice for new or current staff?

 

Try to establish connections with other staff and departments whether that is emailing your counterpart in another office or attending division-wide programs. It will give you a chance to see the scope of how much of an impact we make in the lives of others here at UGA and in the community.

 

What’s the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

 

I think maybe seeing the world’s greatest Rock ‘n’ Roll band (The Rolling Stones) five times in concert. Having two older brothers meant that I didn’t have much choice when it came to well, pretty much anything, when the three of us were together. There were many summers that the three of us drove to Westhampton (New York) to visit my grandmother, and the rule was the driver got to choose the music. I am sure I did not like it at the time, but looking back I can appreciate it as they are the reason I love The Stones. As Keith Richards once said, “Music is a language that doesn’t speak in particular words. It speaks in emotions, and if it’s in the bones, it’s in the bones.”  There is something so exciting about seeing them in concert, and I am I hoping to get one more chance!

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Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Staff Spotlights: Al Jeffers

Al Jeffers

Associate Director for Facilities Operations - University Housing


Al works as the Associate Director for Building Services and Business Operations in University Housing and was nominated by a colleague for a Staff Spotlight. Al’s nominator wrote, “Al Jeffers has been working at UGA for many years but has been working within University Housing for a little more than a year. In the short time that he's been here, he has really taken incredible steps to get connected to his team, provide solid leadership and great supervision, and take the lead on quite a few departmental wide projects that have yielded great changes within our department (space audit/survey, new furniture for Myers Hall, outlining a staff apartment furniture cycle, outlining summer work to accommodate for student transitions, etc.). He also has an overall positive disposition that makes him incredibly approachable and a team player. He has been nothing but a joy to work with.”

 

Hi, Al! Are you from Athens or Georgia? If not, what led you to UGA?

“I was born in Pennsylvania and grew up in York, Pennsylvania before I went to Ursinus College to run track and cross country. I had several family members attend Ursinus, so it seemed like the right path for me. After a couple of years, I transferred to Clemson University where I majored in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism Management. I chose to transfer there because of the major and I knew people from my high school that had attended Clemson. I also felt like it would provide a “larger experience” that I felt like I was missing. Athletics have, and continue to be, part of my life, so I think I wanted to see a larger experience. Plenty of my friends at Clemson were from Atlanta and so, in turn, I had heard about Athens. After I graduated, I felt like it would be a great place for me and it has been. I’ve lived here for at least half my life, and it is one of the many places that I call home.”

 

Have you worked at UGA the whole time you’ve lived here?

“No, I used to own a bike shop called Sunshine Cycles. Cycling and running have both been big parts of my life. I have all kinds of cycling stories. It was a pretty great time to use some of the management coursework that I took in managing various international cycling teams. You even have people who all they do is get sponsored and travel the country, going from race to race, and it was fun to host them during those trips. I still remember having bikers, bike gear, and equipment spread all over my house during the busy times of the year. This is back when Athens Twilight had been around for a little bit but was still growing. After I sold my shop in 2000, I was a woodworker for a few years and did a variety of jobs around town until I started working in FMD [Facilities Management Division]. I worked for FMD for 17 years until I had the [Housing] position cross my desk, but didn’t think anything of it. I have a friend that, at the time, interacted with University Housing more than I did and who said two things about the job: 1) You’d be great at it and 2) There’s a lot of good people over there. The second comment sparked my interest and inspired me to apply.”

 

What is something about your position in University Housing that you would like other staff to know?

“There is such a dramatic shift [in] facilities management from my time in FMD to what we are responsible for in Housing. These spaces are truly lived in 24/7 and you never know what each day is going to bring. While some of that is part of working on a college campus, we get to help design incredible learning environments for students. With the renovations going on in our residence halls, we are given an opportunity to craft aspects of the student experience where they will be able to make friends, study for exams, and become a Bulldog. Whether it is picking out furniture for the common spaces or the desks they will sit at in their rooms, we get to contribute directly to their success in such an inspiring way.”

 

Do you still do any cycling or running? Any other hobbies?

"I spend a lot more of my time running these days. I help coach people in the community every Tuesday and Thursday as they train for a half or full marathon. I started doing that about ten years ago and I figured I would stop once people stopped showing up, but it has kept consistent over the last decade. Each person comes from a different walk of life from throughout Athens. I also used to help with the AthHalf when it was first getting started. Now I help with the annual Give Thanks Thanksgiving 8k that happens on Thanksgiving each year. I still like to do some woodworking when I have the occasional project that a friend asks me to build. We also travel as a family whenever we can."

 

What do you like most about working here?

"People tell you all the time that UGA has such an incredible impact in the Athens community, but I have seen it first-hand. My daughter is a December 2019 graduate and her experience has been incredible. I like getting to be a part of [the] experience these students have. I mean it when I say I feel very fortunate to get to do the work that we do with the people that I work with. I’m still occasionally in awe that I got asked to be a part of UGA in this way. My wife also works here, so we have a lot of family connections to the school. She is originally from Cortona, Italy and, fun fact, her father was integral in establishing the connection to bring UGA to Cortona, Italy for the new art program. We spent our 25th [wedding] anniversary going back to Italy to be a part of the [program’s] 50th anniversary celebration. Connections aside, I also like the atmosphere my team has. Almost 100 people report up to me and I really enjoy getting to use my sports background to influence my approach with leading people. It makes finding the passion in our work easy because it is in everything that we do.”

 

Any advice for new or current staff?

“I think this is an incredible place that we can sometimes take for granted because we work here. This is a special place to work. I would say for the current staff to try and take moments where you pause, take a step back, and really take a look at what you do here at UGA for others. We get to be a part of something really special. Some days might feel like work more than others, but we get to have such a positive effect on others. New and current staff, I would say to take advantage of what you have here. Not every school provides tuition assistance to staff, so if going to school is something that interests you, UGA can help you achieve that goal. I would recommend trying to say ‘yes’ to all that you can. Yeah, you’re busy and likely shouldn’t say yes to everything, but you never know what doors will open for you just by trying something new. I would also say network as much as you can. We get to work with some really incredible people that are movers and shakers in their fields. Connect with them and learn from them because there is plenty to learn.”

 

What’s the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

“I have too many, it’s hard to choose. I’m a firm believer of what Jimmy V said: “If you laugh, you think, and you cry, that is heck of a day.” I try to live my life so that each day has a little bit of that. Hopefully, most of the time those are tears of joy but sometimes they aren’t.  

If I had to pick, I would say visiting Philly after I graduated from Clemson to go see the Philadelphia Cycling Championship. This race is about 160 miles and is one that has international implications for its racers. I remember seeing millions of people there, watching as they raced, and thinking about how incredible it was. The race also finished in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, which is where Rocky ran up the steps, so it was just a cool race to watch.

After I moved to Athens and opened my bike shop, the opportunity opened up where a team was looking for a manager, so I signed on to help manage them. They had lost a sponsorship, which is part of the whole process at times, and they came into the shop wanting to know if I knew of any local businesses looking to sponsor a team. I called around to a few cyclists that I knew and there was a graphic designer for Duck Head in Winder that put in a word for us to come into a meeting and make a pitch. We got our presentation together, made our pitch, and then ended up getting a sponsorship from them. Long story short, no one would have told me that five years later, from when I went to watch the race in Philly, that I would be managing a team that was in [that] race. We ended up putting a rider on the podium and getting on the front page of USA Today. I would say that was a pretty cool moment."

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

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Staff Spotlights: Liana Natochy

Liana Natochy

Alcohol and Other Drugs Education Coordinator - University Health Center


 

Are you from Athens originally? If not, where did you grow up?

I am from Ft. Lauderdale, FL. I liked growing up there because I love the beach!

 

Did you attend college and, if so, where and what did you study?

I…went to the University of Florida. Hopefully our students and staff won’t hold that against me [laughs]. I really liked my experience there. I was able to be an involved student leader, grow as a person, and really dive into my major in criminology and law. After I completed my degree, I worked full-time for a little while before going back to school. I attended Bowling Green State University, where I got my degree in College Student Personnel.  

 

You mentioned being an involved student leader on campus while at UF. What are some of the things you were a part of?

Getting a chance to learn and grow outside of the classroom really propelled me into the field I’m in now. I was a part of criminology and law honor society, was an RA (resident assistant), on a dance team, in a co-ed business fraternity, an employee relations ambassador for the career resource center, worked in campus dining, and plenty of other things.

 

Being an RA really opened [up] a whole world of being able to connect and contribute to the university community. It helped me grow in my confidence as a leader. I would say that and putting myself out there to try out to be on a dance team helped bolster my confidence as a person and a leader. When you are either responding to a resident in crisis or needing to stay on top of your schedule to balance academics with other commitments, it really [helps] you grow leaps and bounds as a person.

 

What did you do before you went back to school to get a degree in college student personnel? Why the shift?

While in undergrad, I had a Loss Prevention internship with Ross that helped me expand on my coursework in criminology and law. When I graduated, I felt compelled to do something related to my undergraduate degree. I participated in the executive development program with Macy’s and it helped me explore whether I was fully interested in this being the career pathway for me. Through the experience, I learned I wasn’t really fulfilling what I was meant to do. My brother knew that I had been weighing all this but was a little afraid to make the leap. So, he surprised me with a gift of signing me up for the GRE and encouraged -- or pushed [laughs] -- me to chase this opportunity. It’s because of him and his encouragement that I prioritized entering higher education.

 

 

Did you have an assistantship at Bowling Green State University? If so, what was the focus area?

Yes! I was in the department of recreation and wellness, working with Wellness Connection initiatives. My responsibilities included programming and development of events that helped students tie health and wellness into their daily lives. I had practicum internships in other offices and departments, but wellness and helping others incorporate wellness into their lives is an area of the field that I am very passionate about.

 

Do you have any hobbies or things that you like to do for fun?

I like to try new things all the time. I make jewelry, paint, dance, and love to read. A genre of books that I always enjoy is self and professional development books. I write sometimes, but not as much as I would like. I also like to travel. I would like to visit Hawaii one day.

 

What do you like most about working in UGA Student Affairs or about your job?

So much! [laughs] No, seriously. I get to do some really cool things each day. One of [my] favorite things about my work is the presentations with and for students about health and wellness. It creates an open dialogue about things that they, or their friends, might be struggling with managing. Sometimes a big perception is “everyone else is drinking so I should too,” and it’s incredibly powerful to honor a student’s fears and help them realize they aren’t alone. That they can pursue their own pathway and not have to worry about “fitting in” with others. It can sometimes be quite difficult for students to ask for help out of fear of “getting in trouble” or ruining a relationship with someone they care a lot about. I get to be the person that has resources and time to listen to them as they navigate all of that while also trying to go to class, lead their student organization, and so much more.

 

What might be something other staff do not know about the work your office does?

We do wellness coaching with students. Sometimes they feel really stuck in their patterns or forget that they are a person first and a student second. We help them develop their wellness goals such as time management and stress management techniques so they can be in a good place as they enter the classroom each day.

 

Other things colleagues might not necessarily know about alcohol and other drug education is [that] the standard is constantly changing. We always have to adapt and adjust to an ever-evolving field of population needs, trends, etc. Another factor that heavily influences our work is how varied a student’s support network might be. Some have mentors, coaches, family, friends, and other humans in their life they can rely on to help manage stress, navigating the college experience, and all the other things they bring with them the first day they come to campus, and others might not. In turn, it challenges us to be up to date with current trends and to adapt to the needs of each student.

 

If someone wanted to collaborate with you, what would they reach out to you about?

We would love to partner! For example, if someone advised a student organization or group, we could come into an executive board or general body meeting to do a workshop on stress management, coping skills, and developing connections to weave health and wellness into their daily life. Sometimes student leaders spend so much time on helping others that they don’t take the time to connect with their own selves as people. Instead of putting it on someone else to find the time to develop a meeting or workshop for them, we can come in and lead the entire thing!

 

Any advice for newer staff or things that you’d like to share?

My advice would be to determine what you deem as a success. Yeah, there’s a good chance those are outlined for you in your job description but make a point to figure out “what made today a great day?” and be okay with that might not happen every day. Not everything is going to happen in the first, second, or third time frame you have set up for yourself, so be patient with yourself and others. Examine how you determine and define meaning and value in your work and life beyond work, be ready to share that with others. Creating buy-in can come from something as simple as sharing something you are excited and passionate about.

 

Anything you would like others to know? It could be about your work or just in general.

I feel like this is my calling. I enjoy getting to do things that I view as essential to the student, and people, experience. There is plenty of opportunity to shatter barriers, reduce stereotypes, and help students grow as people while they are here. I really enjoy getting to help a student break through feeling like they “aren’t enough” when something on social media or in their experience makes them feel that way. While that might seem simple when it is written, if they aren’t fully able to appreciate who they are as a person, then that can dramatically impact their performance in the classroom as well as how they engage within the UGA community.

 

What’s the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

One of the coolest things I’ve probably ever done was going to the Ukraine in 2005 with my family and get to see where my dad and his side of the family grew up. It was incredible to see his experience, see where my grandparents worked, and just view what his life what like before he came to the US.

 

Liana was nominated and selected by a group of her peers as the 2019 Student Affairs Awards recipient of New Professional of the Year. All nominees and award recipients were contacted to participate in a Staff Spotlight feature. Have a colleague that you want to recognize for their work? Contact us at lsi@uga.edu or complete the Staff Spotlights form at the link below. 

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Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Staff Spotlights: Ben Cecil

Ben Cecil

Assistant Director - International Student Life


Are you from Athens originally? If not, where did you grow up?

I grew up outside of Atlanta, GA in the Johns Creek area.

 

Did you attend college and, if so, where and what did you study?

I went to UGA for my undergraduate degree where I majored in International Affairs with a minor in Spanish. After graduating, I attended Florida State University where I received my Master of Science degree in Higher Education.

 

Why were you interested in International Affairs? Did you have any interests or hobbies in high school that led you to pursue that major?

I was in the band in high school, where I played the clarinet all four years and was a drum major for three years. I have a cousin who is a professional clarinetist so it drew my interest. I do not think my band experience drew me to my major, but growing up I had always been interested in learning and connecting with people, which band allowed me to do. I have always been curious and interested in all things international affairs — the history of international relations, government, and other cultures. I have always found learning about different cultures, people, and customs across the world so incredibly riveting.

 

What hobbies do you have now?

It seems simple, but there is something so great about grabbing a bite to eat or going to a concert with close friends. I love cooking, traveling, and reading. I am currently pursuing my PhD at UGA’s Institute of Higher Education, so the majority of my reading is homework-based [laughs], but I still enjoy learning and applying what I am learning in my work. I enjoy running and yoga, also. Even if it is just for an hour or so, the opportunity to meditate and focus on my breathing is wonderful. It is my own moment to focus on me and appreciate everything in the moment.

 

You mentioned attending Florida State University for graduate school and have since returned to UGA for your current role in International Student Life. What was that transition like to leave UGA, attend a different school, and then come back?

It was incredible. I wanted to make sure that I was rounding out my experiences by attending a different school after finishing undergrad. I still remember visiting [FSU] and thinking that I saw so much potential for me to grow. That is exactly what happened. As I approached graduation, I was nervous about applying here [at UGA] because I did not want it look as if I was not exploring my options. To be honest, the senior coordinator position after graduate school is and was an incredible opportunity. It was directly linked to my two passions — international relations and the student experience. I am glad that I took the leap to apply because it has been an experience that promotes my evolution as a person and a professional. As time has gone on, I have been able to expand my approach from programmatic to big picture thinking.

 

It sounds like you really enjoy your job. Is there anything you love most about it?

I love getting to do many different things in one role. I appreciate getting to balance between being a specialist in a specific focus area in the field of student affairs and getting a wide array of opportunities to make an impact directly and indirectly in the lives of students. It is incredible to get to see how much our work directly affects student lives. No two days are the same, so it continues to call upon my adaptability to find a solution that is best for our students. In addition, because of the resources international students need to be successful, it calls on me to connect and build relationships across campus to ensure they are getting the best of what UGA can offer.

 

What might be something other staff do not know about the work your office does?

I think there is a perception that we only work solely with international students. What I love about our work is that we get to encourage intercultural education for all students. International students and non-international students get to explore cool and unique things about different cultures through events and programs. I have grown so much by being able to learn about others across the world so it is great to be able to provide others with that option as well.

 

If someone wanted to collaborate with you, what would they reach out to you about?

We can incorporate a lot of our information and resources to practically any and every program. Whether it is sharing information about a program or helping provide a broader cultural lens to a program, we love finding new ways to collaborate with staff. Something to keep an eye on would be International Education Week coming up in November where we celebrate the benefits of international education and acknowledge the contributions of international students on campus. Staff can attend and bring their students to International Coffee Hour every Friday from 11:30am-1:00pm in the Memorial Hall Ballroom. We also offer a training for staff and faculty called Global Dawgs where we provide resources to enhance intercultural competency. Of course, we are open to collaborating and would love to learn from others ways in which we could collaborate.

 

Any advice for newer staff or things that you’d like to share?

I would say, overall, find a way to connect with others. There’s so many incredible people that work here. Find ways in which you can take the time to curate relationships with colleagues around you. It’s important to know the people that you work with beyond just their title and job description. Try new things around Athens to find your community with people at UGA and outside of UGA.

 

What’s the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

In May 2018, I took fourteen students on a Maymester study abroad program in Costa Rica that focused on geology and culture, where I taught a section of ISL’s class, ECHD 4000 – Global Perspectives in Culture. Not only was it fun to get to connect with students that were studying complex, geological things, but I also got to go zip lining. It was such a humbling and awe-inspiring experience to zip line through the forest canopy. Another cool experience is that I studied abroad as part of the UGA at Oxford program. I spent three weeks there during my last year as an undergraduate student. Spending time abroad taught me a lot. It gave me the chance to learn and grow. Whether it was learning my way around or expanding my perspective on the world, I learned that I am capable more than I thought I was.

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

SEC and NIC Coalition

Southeastern Conference Senior Student Affairs Officers and Executive Directors/Chief Executive Officers of the North American Interfraternity Conference Partner on Coalition

At Power 5 Conference, organizations commit to collaborating on the wellbeing of fraternities

ATHENS, Ga., Oct. 11, 2019 – A coalition has formed between senior student affairs officers of the Southeastern Conference (SEC) schools and the executive officers of the North American Interfraternity Conference (NIC) member organizations on SEC campuses. The group will collaborate to adopt current best practices and develop next-best practices to enhance the fraternity experiences on member campuses.

The representative members of the coalition affirm the importance of the fraternity experience in the academic success and personal development of individual students. Additionally, they are committed to developing lifetime allegiances to both alma mater and member organizations.

“Fraternity and sorority life in the Southeastern Conference is an integral part of a vibrant climate on the 14 SEC campuses,” said Dr. Danny Pugh, vice president for student affairs at Texas A&M University. “The senior student affairs officers of the SEC came together in February of 2018 to affirm our commitment to these students and organizations. Our goals are to further develop best practices within the conference and to engage the collective student leaders of these organizations to meet current and future challenges. Our most recent work with the North American Interfraternity Conference presents a new opportunity to positively advance these organizations for the foreseeable future.”

With more than 100,000 students combined in fraternities and sororities, SEC chapters and individual members make significant, constructive impact in their communities. Specifically, research shows that academic performance, retention, philanthropy, campus leadership, and alumni involvement is enhanced through engagement in fraternal membership. Nationally, approximately one in 10 fraternity and sorority members attend SEC institutions.

“Our recent collaboration with NIC reflects our commitment to enhancing the fraternal experiences on our respective campuses,” said Dr. Brandi Hephner LaBanc, vice chancellor for student affairs at the University of Mississippi. “Our campus communities have worked tirelessly, but independently, to strengthen fraternity and sorority programs. With nearly one in 10 fraternity and sorority members attending an SEC institution, we are optimistic that this approach will provide a support structure to strengthen the experience for all of our students while also creating future best practices for universities across the nation. ”

Leadership within SEC and NIC organizations have committed to open and transparent communication within the collective group as well as individual member institutions and member organizations, while recognizing the unique attributes of each organization.

“Strong relationships move the needle for positive advancement which is why our members are thrilled to partner with the SEC to better serve the conference’s alumni and students,” said Judson Horras, NIC president and CEO. “We hope this partnership can be a catalyst for more collaboration among higher education and our member fraternities.”

The group has committed to equal and timely communication through annual meetings and strategic planning and will support the annual SEC Fraternity & Sorority Student Leader Best Practice Summit each year. The inaugural summit is planned for January 2020.

 

About the University of Georgia: Chartered by the state of Georgia in 1785, the University of Georgia is the birthplace of public higher education in America—launching our nation’s great tradition of world-class public education. What began as a commitment to inspire the next generation grows stronger today through global research, hands-on learning and extensive outreach. A top value in public higher education, Georgia’s flagship university thrives in a community that combines a culture-rich college town with a strong economic center.

About the Southeastern ConferenceA pioneer in the integration of higher education and athletic competition, the Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a leader on the national landscape for intercollegiate athletics in the 21st century. Since its formation in 1933, the SEC has achieved stature and stability by designating governing/voting power to the presidents of the member institutions. These university leaders determine the policies of the conference and through the years this involvement has been the principal source of strength in the evolution of the SEC. Throughout its 82-year history, the SEC has provided leadership on the vital issues facing intercollegiate competition.

Alabama, Auburn, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, LSU, Mississippi, Mississippi State, Tennessee and Vanderbilt have been in the SEC since its formation in 1933. The league has expanded twice, adding Arkansas and South Carolina in 1991, then Missouri and Texas A&M in 2012. www.secsports.com

About the North American Interfraternity ConferenceThe North American Interfraternity Conference (NIC) is a trade association representing 66 inter/national men’s fraternities. The current member organizations have 6,100 chapters located on 800 campuses, with 380,000 undergraduate members and 4.2 million alumni. NIC member organizations also represent a diverse range of fraternity men and interfraternal interests, including fraternities founded for leadership and business interests as well as faith-based, multicultural, historically black, and new or emerging fraternities. www.nicfraternity.org

 

###

Media contact: Stan Jackson, Director of Student Affairs Marketing and Communications Initiatives, University of Georgia, 706-42-1793, ugastan@uga.edu.

Media contact: Todd Shelton, Chief Communication Officer, North American Interfraternity Conference, 317-872-1112 ext. 447, todd.shelton@nicfraternity.org

 

 

 

A Coalition Between the Senior Student Affairs Officers of the Southeastern Conference and the Executive Directors/Chief Executive Officers of the North American Interfraternity Conference Member Organizations on SEC Campuses

 

September 2019

 

Preamble

The representative members of the coalition affirm the importance of the fraternal experience in the academic success and personal development of the individual student. Additionally, we strongly believe in developing lifetime allegiances to both alma mater and member organization.

 

Commitments

We, the representative members of the coalition, commit to open and transparent communication among the collective group as well as individual member institutions and member organizations. While recognizing potential unique attributes of member institutions and member organizations, we are committed to the following:

  1. Recognizing the hierarchical equivalence between the Senior Student Affairs Officer of a Southeastern Conference member institution and the Executive Directors/Chief Executive Officers of the North American Interfraternity Conference Member Organizations and our commitment to appropriate and timely communication between the parties
     
  2. The Senior Student Affairs Officers of the Southeastern Conference member institutions and the Executive Directors/Chief Executive Officers of the North American Interfraternity Conference Member Organizations agree to meet annually and electronically conference quarterly. A sub-committee of coalition partners has been developed to set and arrange annual meetings/calls, establish agendas, etc.
     
  3. Creating alignments between immediate past initiatives/efforts for a collaborative path forward relative to strategic and master planning.
     
  4. Support, as appropriate, the future Southeastern Conference Student Fraternity & Sorority Student Leader Best Practice Summit. The summit will draw upon student leaders from the Southeastern Conference campuses who will highlight individual campus best practices and develop next best practices for adoption across conference member institutions.

The Office of the
Vice President
for Student Affairs

306 Memorial Hall
Athens, GA 30602
706-542-3564
askstudentaffairs@uga.edu

 

Directions

From the Tate Center Parking Deck, take the elevator to the 3 rd floor. Walk across the courtyard with the UGA bookstore on your left hand side. Take the stairs up to the street. Cross Sanford Drive. Memorial Hall will be directly in front of you. Stay on the left side of the building and walk around to the side entrance for disability access. From the side door you can take the elevator to the third floor. If an elevator is not needed walk up all the stairs on the side of Memorial Hall and turn right, there you will see Reed Quad. Walk up the steps with the columns to the main entrance of the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.

For directions please call 706-542- 3564.

Staff Spotlights: Lance Haynie

Lance Haynie

Associate Director for Programs - Recreational Sports

 

I would like to nominate Lance for Supervisor of the Year because he is a supervisor that I hope to be one day… He constantly is reading, watching or listening to those in the leadership community so that he can hone his skills and lead his team effectively…He makes the effort to check in on his staff to see how we are doing. It shows me that he cares about me as a person not just as an employee.

 


One thing is for certain: you’re pretty passionate about being a Dawg.  Are you from Georgia? Did you go to school at UGA?

I am originally from Texas. I grew up in West Texas and it has a special place in my heart. All it takes is the smell of the outdoors there and the nostalgia will kick in to remind me days spent outside with family.

While I did not go to school here, it’s been easy for me to “buy-in” and become a part of Bulldog nation at UGA. I went to Texas A&M University where I spent my time as a climbing and rafting guide while I worked on my Parks, Recreation, and Tourism degree. After I graduated, I went to Clemson University where I received my masters in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism.

 

Sounds like the outdoors have been quite a big factor in your life. What led you to student affairs?

As an undergrad, I benefitted from the work the staff put into our development as students. Most university recreational sports departments are a part of student affairs divisions, so even if you are in a “non-traditional” student affairs program or educational path, your work will still call you to student affairs work. I think there is a lot of opportunity to be a part of the growth and development of others through the services provided by outdoor recreation and recreational sports departments. People can connect their learning inside the classroom to the outdoors, make friends through club sports, or even achieve personal health goals- it’s a great way to make an impact in the lives of others.

 

Do you have a particular memory or moment when you felt “this is ‘it’…this is my ‘calling’”?

Yes--when I worked at the University of Alabama after I finished graduate school. In 2011, there had been a series of natural disasters where tornadoes had torn through Tuscaloosa. In Tuscaloosa, the University of Alabama takes up a lot of the town. As a result, the university and the staff were all called upon to help provide support in some way as the town recovered. We immediately had to go into “crisis-management mode” and I called upon a lot of my “life training” being in the wilderness and backcountry. Recreational sports was asked to help serve as a triage center to house those displaced, so we needed to provide people shelter from the storms and help triage various medical needs they had. We all banded together as a staff and adapted to what needed to be done to help the town recover. It was a perfect mesh of my outdoor education and assisting an institution in fulfilling its role of serving the community.

 

Congratulations on winning the Supervisor of the Year Award! Were you surprised when your name was called?

Yes! Absolutely, yes. It’s one of those things where you think you are doing all that you can [as a supervisor] while also hoping that it’s helping [others]. Whether it’s to help create a space for staff to thrive or perhaps those times when we need to have tough conversations – being a supervisor is one of those jobs that you can always improve on. It’s nice to know someone appreciates what you’re doing enough to nominate you for an award.

 

Is there anything you would like to share about your supervision or leadership philosophy?

I enjoy reading articles or listening to podcasts about leadership and supervision--whatever I can do to keep improving. I even keep files of cutouts, articles, or even sticky notes that have quotes about leadership, motivation, or just leading from the heart. I like to revisit them every now and then to re-center myself around what kind of supervisor I want to be. I think that’s something that can be tiring for some—the thought that maybe we aren’t going to be able to do it right every time. Being a supervisor is always a path of improvement. For me, that desire to keep going and honing my, and my staff’s abilities, is where I feel my passions lie.

Self-awareness is pretty important, too. I need to know and be aware that I have that kind of viewpoint [towards constantly improving] and to notice when that approach or perspective might not always sit well. Everyone has “off days,” so feeling outside of my own [viewpoint] and taking on the perspectives of others really helps me in my work.

 

If someone wanted to partner with you, what would they reach out to you about?

Our office has a lot of versatility in how we can be a part of the memories made by others. We can help with team building by facilitating a challenge course for you and your newly elected student leaders, or do a “one-time” program where students learn how to kayak out at Lake Herrick. We are in the business of making, and help others make, memories.

My main goal is for our staff to provide experiences for students and community members to have something to look back on fondly. Our hope is to be a part of those memories so that students can remember events like RamseyPalooza or playing in the flag football intramural championships in Sanford Stadium. It’s the “I made all these friends on the rugby or ultimate Frisbee club or took a Zumba class 20 years ago and these are the people that are a part of my support system”-kind of moments and memories.

 

If you had one word or sentence to describe your experience here, what would it be?

I would say “improvement.” They say “iron sharpens iron” and I would say that I am continually honing my craft while simultaneously using it, dulling it, and refining it. I’m constantly evolving how I work as a leader on my team to best support those around me.

 

Any advice for newer staff or things that you’d like to share?

It’s hard, but try to respect and/or trust the process. You’re only new at a workplace once. Yeah, you might move to another department or area in the institution, but don’t rob yourself of the curiosity that a new person can bring. Be comfortable with the idea that you are not going to know everything on the first day. Trust that you were hired for a reason. Trust in those that saw greatness within you and their faith that you are able to do the job you are asked. I try to reflect on one thing I love or “get to have” about my job whenever I can. I recommend it because it gives you the space to appreciate the richness that you have added to the lives of others.

 

What’s the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

My default answer will always be getting to be a husband and dad. That’s hard to beat, but I also understand that those reading this might want something else as well [laughs]. The postcards for the National Parks around my office are from helping lead an ecology and geography expedition throughout the U.S. with faculty and staff across the country. Students were able to gain 16 hours of course credit to participate in hands-on fieldwork learning directly about their field of study, and I got to be their field guide as we went around to different National Parks. I helped facilitate various activities to help connect their learning to their personal development, ranging from trip logistics to outdoor safety skills like hiking safety. 

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Linked-In Learning Courses for Supervisors

As part of efforts to enhance the quality of supervision throughout the Division, all supervisors are required to have at least 4 meetings throughout the calendar year with each of their direct reports. The four meetings include:

  1. Goal setting and Expectations
  2. Annual Performance Review
  3. Review and Check-in (2 times per year)

Student Affairs is referencing this list of courses available on Linked-in Learning (formerly Lynda.com) as an additional resource supervisors may use, as desired, to prepare for these three main types of required meetings. This list also includes courses on a variety of topics supervisors may find helpful. Please note that these are only intended as resources and every supervisor should have a discussion with their own supervisor before implementing any new major initiative in their department.

 

1.Goal Setting and Expectations

Performance Management: Setting Goals and Managing Performance
20 min.

Set your employees up for success.This course provides an overview of the goal setting process to translate hard work into productivity.The course is designed to help supervisors understand how to: craft appropriate goals for employees, support their employees, gather relevant performance data and ensure accountability.
 

Improving Employee Performance
1 hour 4 min.

Explore strategies for creating a culture that encourages high performance as well as best practices for improving employee performance in the modern workplace.  This course covers techniques for setting clear expectations, delegating tasks and managing remote workers.  The course also discusses how to get to the root of poor employee performance and coach both high-performing and low-performing employees.


Start with Why: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action
14 min.

This course is a summary of a book.  The book's key insight is that businesses, individuals, and movements of all kinds should always start with “why”, their reason for doing something. This why should be the basis for every decision its leaders make and every message they transmit. By doing so they will attract loyal supporters and garner long-term success.


Delegating Tasks
35 min.

Learn how to delegate work effectively.This course helps supervisors understand the importance of delegation and helps supervisors determine tasks which should and should not be delegated.To scale your career, you have to learn to scale what you can accomplish and that can only be done by enlisting other people to help. It advises supervisors have to identify exactly which tasks you can outsource, break them down into meticulously detailed steps, find someone to hand them off to and train them up.

 

2.  Annual Performance Review

Performance Review Foundations
2 hours 20 min.

Learn how to gather performance feedback, write reviews, and deliver them effectively, while making performance review conversations part of your management year-round.This course covers a lot of ground! It starts by putting things in perspective and discussing the big picture, including the overall performance cycle and competency models.Next, it covers goal-setting, several vital aspects of data collection, writing employee reviews, and how to effectively conduct evaluation meetings. 


Performance Management: Conducting Performance Reviews
29 min.

Learn how to prepare for and conduct fair, productive performance reviews.  This course emphasizes the impact that a performance evaluation (a formal, permanent document) will have on an employee's future.  This course discusses essential steps that will help you write and share a review effectively and provides tips for making reviews more useful and less stressful for both you and your employees.

 

Delivering Employee Feedback
28 min.

This course explores what drives the need for feedback, the characteristics of great feedback, and how to deliver feedback effectively.  At the conclusion of the course, you'll be more confident delivering needed information to whoever needs it, whenever they need it.


Having Difficult Conversations
1 hour 7 min.

This course recognizes conflict is inevitable in all parts of our lives and points out managers must address performance issues and colleagues with competing priorities must figure out a way to work together.  As a result, difficult conversations are necessary.  This course explains how to have these difficult conversations, build your communication skills, and improve your relationships, team work and business performance.

 

3.  Review and Check-in (Coaching)

Coaching and Developing Employees
55 min.

Understand how to establish a coaching relationship with your employees.  This course discusses how open-ended questions, listening, challenging for growth and accountability can increase your employees’ autonomy and problem-solving capacities.  The course includes assessments, exercises and tolls to help your team capture goals, map a career trajectory and accelerate growth, along with sample coaching conversations help you see these tips in practice and understand their potential impact on your people, productivity and results.


Coaching Employees Through Difficult Situations
48 min.

This course helps new and experienced managers address some of the most frequent coaching challenges. Using scenarios, the course demonstrates how to motivate employees who have been demoted or promoted, as well as how to effectively coach employees who have big egos or simply don’t want to be coached. 


Coaching for Results
1 hour

Learn three basic types of coaching – coaching to improve performance, develop careers, and encourage high performers – and apply different techniques to get results.  It discusses some common “coaching traps” and encourages supervisors to develop a coaching habit.


Coaching Skills for Leaders and Managers
35 min.

This course shares the differences between managing, training, and coaching, and provides managers with coaching models and skills to support the growth of their employees. The course presents the business case for coaching, explores common coaching challengers and explains how to provide feedback and set goals.

 

Motivating and Engaging Employees
47 min.

This course emphasizes that employee engagement begins and ends with the leader – their leadership style directly impacts engagement in the organization.  This course helps explain what employees need in order to do their best work and how to provide employees with purpose, meaning and control.  The course busts common myths about employee motivations and shares practical ways to increase engagement – including low-cost solutions to show employees they are valued and relationship-building strategies that will lead to lifelong connections with the members of your team.

 

Giving and Receiving Feedback
49 min.

Giving and receiving feedback is a skill that’s relevant to every member of an organization – this course shows how to give effective feedback, ask for feedback, and use the responses you receive as a tool to improve personal performance. These tips encourage a cycle of continuous development and a growth mindset that can help propel your career and relationships forward.

 

Building Resilience
35 min.

This course explains how to bounce back from difficult situations by building your “resiliency threshold.”  It outlines five training techniques to prepare for difficult situations, and five strategies for reflecting on them afterward.

 

4.  General supervisor training for new supervisors

New Manager Foundations
1 hour

This course provides practical advice to help establish your identity as a leader, connect with your team and become a successful first-time manager.  It also details how to manage change, discusses the importance of diversity and inclusion, and explores how to build resilience through stress management.

           

Transitioning from Manager to Leader
1 hour

The course beings with guidance on personal growth, including practicing self-awareness and emotional intelligence, developing an executive presence and becoming a thought leader.  It also discusses how to see the big picture and enhance your decision-making skills.  It also covers how to develop a well-functioning team: attract top talent, inspire your team with broad-based support and explore tactics for creating rapport and building meaningful relationships.

           

Leadership: Practical Skills
2 hours 40 min

Discover the basic skills leaders and managers of all levels need to lead their teams to success.  This course explores the qualities of a great leader, theories of motivation, leadership styles and core proficiencies like connecting with your team and effectively delegating work.

   

Facilitation Skills for Managers and Leaders
44 min.

Find out how facilitation skills can help you create high-performing, autonomous teams.  It outlines how to develop the core skills of a facilitative leader, such as developing your emotional intelligence, active listening, asking powerful questions, engaging productive conflict, and being flexible in your own thinking as to make room for your team’s input.

           

Motivating and Engaging Employees
47 min.

This course emphasizes that employee engagement begins and ends with the leader – their leadership style directly impacts engagement in the organization.  This course helps explain what employees need in order to do their best work and how to provide employees with purpose, meaning and control.  The course busts common myths about employee motivations and shares practical ways to increase engagement – including low-cost solutions to show employees they are valued and relationship-building strategies that will lead to lifelong connections with the members of your team.

 

Practicing Fairness as a Manager 
45 min.

Learn the importance of practicing fairness as a manager.  This course outlines the four types of fairness: distributive, procedural, informational and interactional.  It also provides techniques that managers can use to make fair decisions and overcome challenges from employees.

 

Navigating Awkward Situations at Work
35 min.

This course is designed to help you navigate a variety of awkward situations.  It includes scenarios of common situations and demonstrates how to handle them with grace and authenticity.

           

Decision-Making Strategies 
48 min.

Learn how to make better business decisions faster, incur less risk and gain support for your decisions.  This course outlines four styles of decision making – autocratic, participatory, democratic, and consensual – and reveals which styles are best suited for specific situations.  It also covers the four types of ambiguity you’ll face so that you can recognize what you don’t know in order to reduce risk and plan for contingencies.

 

 

5.  Advanced supervisor training

Multipliers: How the Best Leaders Make Everyone Smarter
24 min.

This is a summary of a book, which examines the qualities and behaviors that distinguish good leaders (which the book classifies as “Multipliers”) from bad ones (known as “Diminishers”).  The summary proves a series of concise clips that lay out the positive skills that leaders should aim to develop, as well as the behaviors that can hinder their team’s growth.

                 

Management: Top Tips
2 hours 5 min.

This course provides quick tips (in the form of 2 minute videos) on the most essential skills for managers, covering everything from assertiveness and time management to sales and presentation skills.  You can pick and choose which topics most pertain to you and your job responsibilities.

           

Developing Managers in Organizations
59 min.

In this course, learn how to develop exceptional managers who can lead with confidence.  The course outlines the qualities possessed by great managers, and explains how to go about using internal and external resources to help managers acquire the skills needed to inspire and retain talent.

 

Developing a Mentoring Program 
1 hour 5 min.

This course outlines five critical elements of a formal mentoring program, and explains how to establish a program in your organization.

           

Being a Good Mentor 
1 hour

Becoming a mentor gives you a way to share your wisdom and knowledge in a mutually beneficial relationship.  Learn the benefits of being a mentor and how to be successful in this relationship.  The course explains how to get to know your mentee, shares the dos and don’ts for appropriate self-disclosure, and helps you develop a structure and agenda for each mentoring meeting.

           

Being a Good Mentee
55 min.

Connecting with a network of mentors is critical to your career development.  This course provides tips for finding mentors, being a good mentee, and developing a successful mentoring relationship.

           

Organization Communication
1 hour 20 min.

Learn the dynamics of successful organizational communication, so that you can communicate and lead more effectively.  This course helps you evaluate your organization’s communication strategy, focusing on seven key questions to ask yourself before every major project and change initiative.

 

Developing Resourcefulness
18 min.

Learn how to assess and develop the skill of resourcefulness: being able to do more with less.

 

Developing Political Savvy
14 min.

This course shares tip for developing and utilizing political savvy to get more done at work.  What defines “success” in your workplace? Once you understand the social landscape and how political capital works, then you can learn how to audit your own situation and make an action plan to improve your political savvy.

           

Influencing Others
1 hour 21 min.

This course explains how to influence others when you’re at the “pivot point of influence,” by applying 18 scientifically confirmed methods.

 

Management Tips Weekly
7 hours 50 min.

This course provided two new management tips (each 2-4 min in length) every week and learn to improve communication, increase motivation, deal with conflict and build better relationships.Much like “Management: Top Tips” above, you can pick and choose amongst the tips to find the ones most applicable to your needs.

 

Time Management Tips
7 hours 51 min.

This course provided weekly tips (each 3-4 mins in length) on a wide variety of topics, designed to help people better manage their time and ultimately become more productive.  Take this course to learn tips ranging from managing emails and calendars to setting priorities, collaborating with coworkers, reducing interruptions and crafting a “productivity mindset.”

 

 

6.  Leading multiple generations/diverse team

Inclusive Leadership
1 hour

Learn how to create and lead an organization that leverages the diverse talents of all contributors.  This course talks about the benefits of inclusive leadership and then outlines a best practice framework for developing inclusive leaders in an organization and shares tips for avoiding common leadership pitfalls.

 

Leading Inclusive Teams
1 hour

Create a shared understanding of why inclusion is critical for your team.  Learn how to adopt a more inclusive and open communication style and revamp your leadership practices.  This course instructs how to give everyone a change to participate in these efforts, and create an environment that makes everyone feel comfortable bringing their true self to the office – without ever felling like an outsider.

           

Managing a Diverse Team
1 hour 21 min.

This course is led by a leadership coach to equip you with knowledge and impactful strategies that can help you successfully manage, counsel and lead a diverse team.First prepare yourself to lead by identifying cornerstones of diversity and reviewing diversity and inclusion terminology.Then the course shares strategies for observing and coaching your team to cultivate behaviors that build trust and strengthen relationships.

           

Managing a Multigenerational Workforce 
56 min.

Learn how to lead a team comprised of four or five generations: traditionalists, baby boomers, Gen Xers, millennials and Gen Zers.  The course explains differences in the culture in which each generation was raised and what you can do when managing an employee young enough to be your child and old enough to be your parent.

           

Managing Multiple Generations 
50 min.

Discover how to successfully manage multiple generations in the workplace.Learn about each generation present in today’s workforce, from Baby Boomers to Millennials, and figure out what each group wants and needs, and how they like to be managed, developed and promoted.

           

Managing Someone Older Than You
38 min.

Learn how to manage older workers.  Find out how to build more effective communication and collaboration with older workers and create a harmonious and efficient multigenerational team.  He also explains how to overcome age bias (both towards and from older workers) and motivate older workers to be their best, sharing the wisdom of their years of experience can provide to enrich your team.

 

 

7.  Running a good meeting

Managing Meetings
1 hour 40 min.

Discover how to organize and run effective meetings, in person and virtually.  He also discusses how to handle common meeting problems, such as dealing with latecomers and managing conflicts and helps you create ground rules to prevent problems from occurring.  Plus, learn how to add value as an attendee.

           

Creating a Meeting Agenda 
36 min.

Learn how to create an effective meeting agenda and keep meetings on track.  He also explains when to send the agenda, who to send it to, and what factors should be considered in any worthwhile agenda.

 

Common Meeting Problems
54 min.

Learn how to resolve the top ten meeting problems, which include meetings that aren’t necessary, noises and other distractions that throw meetings off track, late attendees, disruptive behavior, lack of focus, meetings that always run too long, lack of progress and lack of participation.

           

Leading Productive Meetings
1 hour 4 min.

Discover how to get the most from your meetings – turning them into productive avenues for communicating, connecting and accomplishing real work.  The course provides insight into how to effectively schedule, conduct and follow up on meetings with minimum time and maximum results.

           

Leading Productive One-on-One Meetings
30 min.

Lean how to set up and run effective one-on-one meetings.  This course explains how to establish a one-on-one meeting schedule and agenda, assign and review action items, and assess the results of the meeting and follow up on promises.  It also explains how to listen to employees’ needs effectively and when to offer training and development.

 

8.  Managing different types of employees

Managing High Performers 
17 min.

Learn innovative strategies for successfully managing, and retaining, your most exceptional employees.  This course familiarizes you with the mindset and motivations of high performers, so that you can use this knowledge to meet their expectations and provide them with the appropriate level of support and development.

           

Managing New Managers
21 min.

Discover how to support and inspire new leaders as they make the critical transition from individual contributor to manager.  This course shows how to identify the unique perspectives and challenges of your new managers, set the expectations for their transition, provide coaching and support and cultivate the right conditions to help them succeed.

   

Managing Someone Older Than You
38 min.

Learn how to manage older workers.  Find out how to build more effective communication and collaboration with older workers and create a harmonious and efficient multigenerational team.  He also explains how to overcome age bias (both towards and from older workers) and motivate older workers to be their best, sharing the wisdom of their years of experience can provide to enrich your team.

           

Managing Up
1 hour 3 min.

Learn how to work effectively with your manager, maximize your career, and achieve success in the workplace.  First, the course helps you determine the management style of your boss, then she outlines techniques for building a strong relationship as well as how to avoid mistakes.  The course also addresses the need to master office politics, how to navigate your workplace effectively, and how to boost your performance by maximizing your personal and positional power.

           

Succeeding in a New Role by Managing Up
21 min.

Learn how to succeed in a new role.  This course brings together advice from a diverse group of people (e.g. actor Ed Norton and Adam Grant, youngest tenured professor at Wharton). Get noticed by bringing together a fearless mindset with stellar productivity and networking skills.

           

Managing Your Manager
1 hour 31 min.

Learn how to manage your reputation and your rapport with your boss.  Discover how to understand your supervisor’s world, preferences and lingo; support your boss’s goals; be a help rather than a hindrance; and lead by offering solutions.  Plus, learn how to manage particularly difficult types of bosses, such as the boss who’s never available, the mean boss, or the boss who acts better than everyone else.

           

Managing Your Career as an Introvert
38 min.

Learn to move forward in your career as an introvert.Get career tips for networking, getting noticed and understanding your skills and abilities.

Supervision Guide - Review and Check-In II

Review and Check-In II (August/September)

  • Suggested video resources: Coaching Skills for Leaders and Managers, Improving Employee Performance
    *Please note that the videos referenced here are only intended as a resource and every supervisor should have a discussion with their own supervisor before implementing any new major human resources initiative in their department.
     
  • Supervisor and supervisee will review the list of expectations. Both individuals are encouraged to discuss any expectations that have been difficult for the supervisee to achieve, or any expectations that have been beneficial to the employee to implement. Questions during this meeting may include:
     
    • Am I meeting your performance expectation and or mutual expectations we established?
       
    • Is there anything that I need to start doing, stop doing, or continue doing to help us meet our goals as a department?
       
    • What are one or two things that you think I need to improve on? What does improvement look like in these areas?
       
  • You may also want to share how you’re feeling about:
    • Current projects and work processes
    • Communication styles and flow?
    • Your professional relationship with coworkers and your supervisor
       
  • ​Morale
    • What have you learned about yourself this year?
    • What do you enjoy about your work? What do you not enjoy?
    • How do you feel valued in your role?
       
  • The supervisor should consider closing the conversation by asking the supervisee how they can support them.
     
  • At the completion of the meeting, both the supervisor and the supervisee will initial the Record of Supervisory Meetings to indicate their mutual agreement that the meeting occurred.

Supervision Guide - Review and Check-In I

Review and Check-In I (April/May/June)

  • Suggested video resources: Coaching and Developing Employees, Coaching Employees Through Difficult Situations, Giving and Receiving Feedback
    *Please note that the videos referenced in this document are only intended as a resource and every supervisor should have a discussion with their own supervisor before implementing any new major human resources initiative in their department.
     
  • Supervisor and supervisee will review the list of expectations. Both individuals are encouraged to discuss any expectations that have been difficult for the supervisee to achieve, or any expectations that have been beneficial to the employee to implement. Questions during this meeting may include:
     
    • Am I meeting your performance expectation and or mutual expectations we established?
       
    • Is there anything that I need to start doing, stop doing, or continue doing to help us meet our goals as a department?
       
    • What are one or two things that you think I need to improve on? What does improvement look like in these areas?
       
  • You may also want to share how you’re feeling about:
    • Current projects and workflow
       
    • Communication flow
       
    • Your professional relationship with coworkers and your supervisor
       
  • Morale
    • What have you learned about yourself this year?
    • What do you enjoy about your work? What do you not enjoy?
    • How do you feel valued in your role?
       
  • The supervisor should consider closing the conversation by asking the supervisee how they can support them.
     
  • At the completion of the meeting, both the supervisor and the supervisee will initial the Record of Supervisory Meetings to indicate their mutual agreement that the meeting occurred.

Supervision Guide - Annual Review

Annual Review (January/February)

  • Suggested video resource: Performance Review Foundations
    *Please note that the videos referenced in this document are only intended as a resource and every supervisor should have a discussion with their own supervisor before implementing any new major human resources initiative in their department.
     
  • Before the annual review, the supervisor will send the supervisee an informal performance self-assessment that includes the tasks and responsibilities which will be on the annual performance evaluation form. The supervisee should complete the worksheet and return to the supervisor no less than two business days prior to the actual annual review.
  • Before the meeting, the supervisor will fill out the annual performance evaluations form and will review the performance self-assessment submitted by the supervisee. This will help the supervisor focus time and thought on any gaps between the supervisor’s assessment and the supervisee’s self-assessment. 
     
  • The supervisor will obtain their supervisor’s signature on the annual performance evaluation prior to meeting with the supervisee.
     
  • During this meeting, the supervisor and the supervisee will engage in the university’s annual review process. This meeting should be reflective of the conversations that have taken place during meetings throughout the year. The supervisor will utilize the annual performance evaluation form as well as the supervisee’s informal performance self-assessment.
     
  • After the meeting, the supervisor will submit the signed copy of the evaluation via SendFiles to Brandie Pentecost for central maintenance of these records. The departmental HR representative will maintain the physical copy of the evaluation.
     
  • At the completion of the meeting, both the supervisor and the supervisee will initial the Record of Supervisory Meetings to indicate their mutual agreement that the meeting occurred.

Supervision Guide: Expectations and Goals

Expectations and Goals (November/December)

  • Suggested video resource:  Performance Management: Setting Goals and Managing Performance
    *Please note that the videos referenced in this document are only intended as a resource and every supervisor should have a discussion with their own supervisor before implementing any new major human resources initiative in their department.
     
  • Supervisor will deliver list of expectations to the supervisee no less than two business days prior to the scheduled meeting.
     
  • Supervisor and supervisee will discuss their mutual understanding of the expectations
     
  • Both the supervisor and the supervisee will fill out a goals sheet and discuss their goals for the next calendar year. Supervisors and supervisees should discuss how the other individual may play a role in supporting or assisting the other in achieving their goals.
     
  • After both goal sheets are reviewed and discussed, supervisor and supervisee should agree upon the goals for the supervisee that year.  Supervisee must submit these goals formally online after the meeting.  Supervisor will review and approve the goals submitted online and will communicate with the supervisee to update the online goals as necessary throughout the year.
     
  • At the completion of the meeting, both the supervisor and the supervisee will initial the Record of Supervisory Meetings to indicate their mutual agreement that the meeting occurred.

Staff Spotlights: Lori Crawford

Lori Crawford

Assistant Director - Center for Student Activities and Involvement - Tate Student Center


How long have you been at UGA? Are you from Georgia?

I have been at UGA going on three years now. No, I am not from Georgia, but once you are a Bulldog it kinda starts to feel like that. I am from Stafford, Virginia.

 

Tell us a little about yourself. Where did you go to school? What did you do there?

I went to Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia where I majored in communication with a focus area in organizational communication.

 

I really enjoyed my experience at Longwood. It’s a school with a lot of history and unique traditions. There, I was an orientation leader and held positions within my sorority and the Panhellenic community. Getting to serve on the Panhellenic Council and help lead the women in the community gave me a lot of incredible access to see what the world of student affairs could look like. Several sororities got their start on Longwood’s campus, so it was cool to be on a campus where many women’s leadership organizations blossomed. After graduating, I worked for my sorority, Alpha Delta Pi, as a traveling consultant before I went to the University of South Carolina to get my master’s in higher education and student affairs.

 

What was being a traveling consultant for Alpha Delta Pi like?

It was eye-opening. During my time as a consultant, I ended up visiting almost 30 different college campuses. I was able to visit a variety of campuses, see how they contribute to their student experience, and witness first-hand how a student’s leadership experience shaped them as people. Interacting with such a wide array of people on any given day, all connected through this common experience being a member of this organization or the campus community, helped me realize my passion for helping students grow throughout their collegiate years.

 

Do any fun stories or experiences stand out from your time traveling and visiting different colleges?

My first visit was to the chapter at UGA. A chapter member, who also happened to be in The Arch Society, gave me a late-night tour of campus and I rang the Chapel Bell for the first time. Looking back on it, that is such a great way start to my career in higher education. It’s kind of poetic that, many years later, I was able to ring the bell again to celebrate getting my job in the Center for Student Activities and Involvement.

 

Do you have a favorite UGA tradition?

I would say ringing the [Chapel] bell is my favorite UGA tradition. There is something special about getting to take a moment to recognize and celebrate an accomplishment or something exciting happening in your life. Plus, you get to decide what is “worth” celebrating. When you hear the bell, you know that somewhere out there, something really great is happening in the lives of others.

 

What led you back to the University of Georgia?

Almost too many [reasons] to list. I like being at the state flagship institution. There’s something special about being able to create an impact and empower students at such a storied institution as this one.

 

[Also] the job itself. I remember thinking, “Oh wow this is exactly what I can see myself doing” when I read the position description. The potential to positively affect the lives of students really spoke to me. I could be a part of something that facilitates a space for students to find themselves – where they can pursue friendships, leadership roles, and gain experiences that will help catapult them into their careers. Maybe a student will be able to find a friend or be able to create an organization that aligns with their passions. Whatever it is, being able to have a hand in that is…well, it’s an incredible gift. It’s nice to be a part of something that gives people a reason to ring the bell each day.

 

What is something about your job that you wish other people knew?

There are couple that I would love to share. One of them is a resource called “Involvement Ambassadors.” These are student leaders who dedicate their time and talents to help coach other students on how to get involved on campus. They hold one-on-one meetings with peers where they learn about a student’s hopes, including what hope to get out of being involved, and help coach them through ways to increase their campus involvement. It’s makes involvement more approachable and provides graduating students the space to mentor underclassmen—a great bookend to all of their experiences by passing on what they learned to another student.

 

Something else I would love other staff to know about my job is our department is expanding the resources for student organization advisors. For example, if you are a faculty member across campus and need help advising a student group, we can either develop or connect you to the appropriate resources to support you in your work. One specific resource is an ongoing advisors roundtable for advisors discuss solutions to lingering questions and get updates about upcoming programs.

 

If someone wanted to partner with you, what would they reach out to you about?

Our office takes a lot of pride in being a campus partner. If you have any questions about student involvement, resources for advisors, community building or want to learn how to help the leadership of an organization grow, we can help. We could organize a program for your resident assistants to help the students on their floor get involved or help your student connect with an Involvement Ambassador. Each semester we coordinate the Involvement Fair for students to learn about the organizations that they can join. Staff and faculty are welcome to attend to see all the opportunities students have to get involved. That way, when a student comes to a staff member asking about how to get involved, staff know what direction to point them in to connect with a group or start their own!

 

If you had to describe one word to describe your experience here, what would it be?

I would say “learning.” Each day I am learning something new. Whether it is how to continue to grow as a supervisor or how to do get better at my job, I am trying my best to be a sponge to soak up all the learning opportunities here. I am always learning.

 

Any advice for newer staff or things that you’d like to share?

I feel like we have so many opportunities to grow and learn here, so I would recommend saying “yes” when you can. Sign up to help or make a point to attend that division-wide event. I can’t tell you the number of times an idea or solution came about while discussing with colleagues at division-wide events. I might be biased because of the office I work in, but there is a lot of support to do that here—to attend things that help me in turn find ways to feel connected to the success of my department and the Division of Student Affairs.

 

What’s the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

I got to be front row of a show to see Robert Plant. I grew up a huge Led Zeppelin fan and it ended up being the perfect concert. I don’t think any other concert will be able to beat it: very cheap tickets, my dream artist/concert, perfect standing section in the front row. It was awesome not only because I grew up listening to them, but this guy is living history.

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Sharing What We Learn

Connecting Learning Among UGA Student Affairs Staff

We’re all learning something new every day, but we often don’t take time or have the opportunity to let others know. Imagine what could happen if we could share our learning division-wide!

Explore the list of learning opportunities that UGA Student Affairs staff participated in recently (below). If any of the opportunities or lessons learned interest you, email ugasastaff@uga.edu and we’ll connect you with the person who participated in the learning opportunity.

Have you presented at a conference and may be interested in presenting your session for the Division? Is there a recent workshop or webinar you participated in that you think other staff should know about? Complete the submission form and we’ll add your experience to the list.

Learning Opportunity Lessons Learned Name Email Address

Sherpa Coaching, offered through UGA Training & Development

 

How to change behaviors that impede success. Kara Fresk kfresk@uga.edu

FourSight Workshop, offered through UGA Training & Development

 

How personal subconscious preferences impact my approach to innovation and project management. Contact Staff Development to facilitate a connection. Email ugasastaff@uga.edu to facilitate a connection to the staff member who shared this opportunity.

Diversity Through Dance, offered through UGA Training & Development

 

How personal space can be different for individuals based on where they are from, and related cultural differences. Contact Staff Development to facilitate a connection Email ugasastaff@uga.edu to facilitate a connection to the staff member who shared this opportunity.

Immunize Georgia

 

CDC updates on routine vaccine recommendations; discover primary care strategies for immunizing adults; HPV vaccine hesistancy and myths. Contact Staff Development to facilitate a connection Email ugasastaff@uga.edu to facilitate a connection to the staff member who shared this opportunity.

APPA Institute

 

Facilities management, project management, and total costs for operations. Al Jeffers jeffers@uga.edu
Supervisory Fundamentals Helpful overview of UGA's employee relations, supervisory resources, and fuller understanding of how UGA interprets Labor Laws. Contact Staff Development to facilitate a connection Email ugasastaff@uga.edu to facilitate a connection to the staff member who shared this opportunity.
Southeast Collegiate Fitness Expo "Gymtimidation" - Health coaching methods for self-care and body-positive language. Lisa Williamson lisawilliamson@uga.edu
Association for Student Conduct Administration 2020 Conference Choosing educational and restortative sanctions for student misconduct, how to conduct efficient investigations into hazing, and how to collaborate for investigations concerning student orgs. Adrian Pritchett akp@uga.edu
Campuses and the Courts Conference New higher education legislation, case law trends for sexual assault cases on campus, and how to address new Title IX regulations. Rebecca Scarbro rcw34@uga.edu
NASPA Strategies Conference How to write inclusive mission statements and programming descriptions, how to include marginalized students in bystander intervention skills practice, and how to develop and implement sexual health/sexual assault prevention programming. Camilla Herdon cherdon@uhs.uga.edu

Sharing What We Learn
Submission Form

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Staff Spotlights: Ricky Boggs

Ricky Boggs

Assistant Director - University Housing


 

Are you from Georgia? If not, where are you from?

Ricky: I am not originally from Georgia. I am from Sam Black Church, West Virginia. I went to Marshall University where I received my bachelor’s in criminal justice and master’s in counseling.

 

Tell us more about Marshall University and how it led you to where you are today.

Ricky: I was pretty involved as a student leader in undergrad. I went to Marshall with the hopes of one day getting into the FBI. Some people grow up wanting to be astronauts or doctors, I wanted to be a part of the FBI. I was also the first person in my family to go to college, so I naturally took advantage of every involvement opportunity I could. After I graduated, I had some mentors and other staff who I admired that recommend UGA – its community, its people, and its students. I trusted them in their advice and pursued a role in University Housing.

 

What caused the switch from law enforcement/FBI to working in education?

Ricky: As a first generation college student, it was my experience as a resident assistant (RA) that really opened my eyes to the world of student affairs and higher education. I think the impact that student leaders have on their campus and in the lives of others is incredible. While I was what some might say “over-involved,” I still wasn’t sold on going into higher education. I then pursued a master’s degree in counseling with a focus in corrections. While in that role, a full time entry-level position opened up in [Marshall’s] University Housing office. While doing that as a grad student, I soon realized that perhaps my passions didn’t lie in my FBI path as much, but instead working with college students. Combined with some incredible mentors at Marshall, I was able to pursue a path in student affairs and complete my degree in 2005.

 

What is something you learned as an undergraduate student leader that has translated to your professional role(s)?

Ricky: I recognized that, like most things in life, the more I put into being an RA, the more I got out of it. I witnessed how much our work as student leaders affected our residence hall as well as the campus community. It was inspiring to know that I was helping others as they “figured out life” while in school. There is no question in my mind that our work, [from] students to professional staff, and everyone in between, is impactful. Whether it is in the larger community or the individual, I love how our work is so dynamic and versatile. We get to help students find their way in a confusing world and that is such an incredible feat.

 

What do you like about working here?

Ricky: I love how wide-reaching Student Affairs can be here at UGA. Staff have the ability to be a part of a variety of things inside of their department or in the greater Division as whole. I tell my students that being an RA is all about what you put into it, and I think the Division is constantly exploring ways to give staff the space to put their spin on programs or services for students. Also, I love my staff. Each person on our team brings their own needs, their own pizazz, and contributes to our work in their own unique ways. That’s where I’m finding the most value in my work – investing in them and doing what I can to support them, not only in their work, but also in their goals. I get to be there for them so that they may be able to be there for someone else.

 

Do you have any advice for new staff or young professionals starting out at UGA?

Ricky: Explore your job or position in way that you almost get lost in it. No one is an expert in their job as soon as they start it, and some aren’t ever fully at that “expert” status, so go easy on yourself while exploring the nooks and crannies of your job.

Take those five minutes to talk to the student or say hello to a colleague. I have lost count on the number of times that a quick five minutes that I initially didn’t think anything of ended up being everything that person needed. 
You’re not expected to be an expert in your job, so make sure to check in occasionally with your supervisor to make sure you are appropriately meeting expectations while also diving into your job.

Determine what makes something feel like “home” to you and see where you can find items on that list here in Athens. I firmly believe that Athens and UGA have so much to offer and are so unique; it’s just sometimes people don’t explore it as much as they want to or are stuck in comparing it to somewhere else. Working at UGA is a great opportunity. When you combine Athens and UGA together, well, that’s where the magic happens.

Seek out other professionals that think like you and not like you so [you can] continue to learn anything and everything about yourself and others.

 

What’s the coolest thing you have ever done and why?

Ricky: When I was at Marshall University, my friend Brian and I were in a hip-hop duo called RnB. We performed at a talent show and won first place singing our song titled “Friends.” The following year, I was a part of a duo called Illeet where we performed for church, for a campus diversity program, and a full-blown concert at a 4-H camp. I still try to write and record music when I can but that was definitely one of the coolest things I have done.

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Staff Spotlights: Tayler Simon

Tayler Simon

RSVP Education Coordinator - Health Promotion - University Health Center


Tayler was nominated for the Innovation Award at the 2019 Annual Student Affairs Celebration.

 

Where are you from? Where did you go to school?

Tayler: I am from Columbia, SC. I went to high school at A.C. Flora and went to College of Charleston for my undergraduate degree in Psychology and minor in Women’s Studies and Sociology. I then went to the University of South Carolina where I received my Masters in Social Work.

 

What are some items and decorations in your office you would like people to know about?

Tayler: I have some plants in my office that I am trying to keep alive. A succulent, cactus, and an air plant that are my own little “mini-coworkers” who bring a little bit of the outside inside to the office. I have a name plate that I received when I completed my internship. My internship supervisor gave it to me to serve as a point of achievement as well as a gentle reminder for why I pursued working in relationship and sexual violence prevention. My internship was in The Hive Community Circle in Columbia, SC, which is a community-based organization that provides support and services to survivors of sexual assault and intimate partner violence. I think it’s important to occasionally take a moment to reflect on why we do the work we do and ensure that, while much might change over time, it’s important to have some connection to what passion and purpose led you down that career path.

 

Could you describe your perspective or approach that you bring to your work?

Tayler: I have always been a fan of hearing people’s stories: what makes them who they are, how they view the world, and so-on. I think each person has a story that is so important and they, in turn, are quite important. I think that approach helps me in my work because you have to be curious about others, be willing to listen, and engage with people to recognize who they are as humans in order to be able to be fully present and support them.

 

What’s one thing you like most about working here?

Tayler: I like working in this area of work; interpersonal violence prevention is something I am very passionate about. I like the students we work with. College students are so fun to work with. They are incredibly smart and fun to be around. They bring so much passion with them and are inspiring with how driven and supportive they are of their peers. I really like being able to be a part of such a formative point in their lives as they learn and grow throughout their time here at UGA.

 

What’s the coolest thing you’ve ever done and why?

Tayler: While I was at the College of Charleston, I got the chance to lead a group of students on a service trip to Cuba. Not only was it incredible to spend time in Cuba for a week, but it also expanded my perceptions of what community service could look like across different cultures. We got to help and experience various beautification projects while also facilitating deep reflection each night. Besides the learning we experienced, I also don’t know if I have ever felt so much love from total strangers. Whether it was at the ice cream spot or a local shop owner, people were so open to sharing their lives, their stories, and their culture with us.

 

How might other staff be able to partner with you?

Tayler: I would love to partner with other departments! I just want people to know that we are here and would love to partner with them. We could explore developing specific program for them or and/or their students. Whether it is a student organization they directly advise, residents they interact with on a consistent basis, or perhaps asking us to come to a staff meeting - I would love to find a solution that supports staff who can in turn help those that are impacted by interpersonal violence. We can build a presentation or program to meet specific needs, but we also present and facilitate programs across campus.

 

What might be something others don’t know about your office or your work that you think they should know?

Tayler: One thing that I think sometimes staff might not necessarily know about [are] the resources provided by RSVP (Relationship and Sexual Violence Prevention) here at UGA. We work holistically with those impacted by interpersonal violence, which includes other students [that] people might not necessarily think [about]. If something happens to a student, their roommate might need support or resources to best support their roommate who is a victim/survivor. We also connect with campus partners and faculty to provide free and confidential advocacy services for students that are victims/survivors. An immediate example being helping reschedule homework or exams while they are recovering.

Our office partners directly with Liana (Alcohol and Other Drugs Education Coordinator) and Camilla (Sexual Health Coordinator) here in Health Promotion, so the three of us work closely together on projects and programs for students and staff.

 

What would be something you are looking forward to in the upcoming academic year?

Tayler: I am looking forward to having the students back and working with them (Editor's note: This interview occurred during Summer 2019). I am not an Athens-native so I am very excited to continue to explore the city and find out new ways to make Athens my home.

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Staff Spotlights: Dale Jacobs

Dale Jacobs

Administrative Assistant - East Campus Village and University Village - University Housing


Dale was nominated by a coworker to be featured in a Staff Spotlight. Dale’s nominator wrote:

Dale has been working at UGA since November 2017 and has made a big impact on our area of campus. The student staff know that they can count on him to be hands-on during the days that are super busy while also challenging them to problem solve when an issue arises. I am proud to call Dale a colleague and friend. He works hard to embody the mission of the department through everything he does. He understands just how vital his role is in the work we do to support the residents. I cannot think of anyone who is more deserving of recognition.

 

Where are you from?

Dale: I grew up in Camden County, Georgia. Before he retired, my father was in the Navy, so we lived in Kings Bay near the base.

 

What are some hobbies or interests that others might not know about you?

Dale: I like hiking, watching sports, and visiting breweries. I grew up rooting for the Braves, so I will pull for them during baseball season.

 

Is there any sport in particular that you like to watch? Do you have a favorite sport you play?

Dale: I’d say my favorite sport to watch and play is basketball.

 

Follow-up question: If a group of staff tries to start up a basketball team they might want to know - are you any good? Should they give you a call?

Dale: [Laughs] I like to think I’m pretty good.

 

What does a “day in the life” look like for you?

Dale: A day in the life…I don’t know; each day is different! Whether it is supervising the Office Assistants or responding to issues, each day at work brings a different level of excitement and something new.

 

What’s one thing you like most about working here?

Dale: I like a lot of things about my job. I guess it would be an awkward Staff Spotlight if I didn’t [laughs]. I really like the people I work with; we really support one another through work and life. My coworker Becki is like a mentor for me and has been great with helping me figure out if I wanted to go back to school or not and sort through all those steps.

 

What’s something cool about your job that others might not know about?

Dale: I really enjoy getting to be a part of the students’ lives. I’m the first person people see when they walk in to our office, so it’s great to be able to greet and meet all kinds of different people each day. One time, for the RA Appreciation Banquet, there was a banner made to go along with the Rugrats from Nickelodeon theme that featured different staff on it as characters.

The students remembered to put me on there with everyone else. Sometimes working in a “supporting role,” there’s potential to be forgotten about with things like that, but here our students and staff make a great effort to include everyone. It’s nice to be remembered and a part of things like that.

 

What’s the coolest thing you’ve ever done and why?

Dale: That’s a tough one. I think either getting to see the last Braves game at Turner Field or graduating from UGA. I was the first person in my family to graduate from college so I think that is pretty cool.

 

Anything about your job that you would like to share?

Dale: I feel like I get to make an impact in a variety of different ways here. When I was a college student, I used to the think the events and programs put on in the residence halls were just free food opportunities, but they are so much more than that. We really get a chance to positively affect a student’s educational experience outside the classroom. Even down to managing reservations for a common room space here in Rooker Hall, if I do my job then students are able to use that space to study or hold programs that, in turn, are the building blocks of changing their lives.

 

You mentioned wanting to go back to school. What would you like to study next?

Dale: I’m starting an online program for Higher Education Administration this summer. When I was younger, I wanted to be a teacher and I think in a way we get to be teachers for students. We help them with all kinds of things in life— from figuring out logistics of a program to gaining more independence. Being able to help students learn and grow outside the classroom is what I would like to do. Plus, I think there is so much each university has to offer and I would like to be that person that helps connect students to all the various resources and services that are available to them. That’s one thing I wish I would have done more of when I was an undergrad[uate] - taken advantage of all that UGA had to offer.

 

What did you study for your undergraduate major?

Dale: Initially, I majored in Economics and minored in Sociology. Once I hit the higher-level courses in Economics, I decided that while I love the theory behind economics, I didn’t really enjoy the complex math that goes into it. I shifted my major to Sociology and enjoyed the theory and different readings that support it. I also think that my next academic step works great with my undergrad major and will help with future jobs in higher education and student affairs.  

 

What should your colleagues in Student Affairs contact you about?

Dale: Most people that reach out to me are student residents with a wide range of questions from looking for a package to filling out a maintenance request or to getting food recommendations. If you need to make a reservation in Rooker Hall, 1516 or University Village, feel free to give me a call and we can figure out what aspects of the spaces will best meet your needs.

 

Do you have a favorite spot to eat?

Dale: I have a bunch. I would say that Cali n’ Titos is my favorite Athens-based restaurant and Raising Canes is my favorite chain.  

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Lisa Williamson

Lisa Williamson

Assistant Director for Fitness and Wellness – Recreational Sports


 

“I’m the kind of person that when I am part of something, I can’t just sit on the sidelines. I want to play an active role to help make things better and my work supports that.”

 

Lisa works in Recreational Sports as the Assistant Director for Fitness & Wellness where she leads the group fitness, personal training, small group training, and the Fitness & Wellness Outreach programs. From Sterling, Ohio, Lisa attended Ashland University in Ashland, Ohio for her bachelor’s and master’s degrees. While at Ashland, she spent her days as a heptathlete and 400-meter hurdler for the Women’s Track & Field Team, and worked for Recreational Services as Lead Group Fitness Instructor and Fitness & Wellness Intern. After graduating with her master’s, she began her career working in campus recreation as the Assistant Director for Fitness & Wellness at Clayton State University in Morrow, Georgia. These opportunities at Ashland and Clayton State allowed Lisa to promote fitness & wellness on campus while being able to stay active in the track & field community through coaching the collegiate teams at both universities.

 

Lisa still trains, aspiring to run in USA Track & Field Masters competition one day. “Track & Field has been a part of my life since I can remember. It’s a great community to be a part of and I love being able to use the sport to give back to local youth.” It must come as no surprise that Lisa picked Spec Towns Track as her favorite spot on campus.

 

When asked what she loved most about her job in Recreational Sports, she said, “It sounds cliché, but getting to work with students is my favorite. I love mentoring and coaching. Whether it’s teaching them how to run a fitness class, discussing how to program for a client, or editing a resume – I enjoy being there for them.” She says that being able to be a part of the RAMFAM enables her to give back to the community and her professional associations, allowing her to keep a fresh perspective on her work. “I’m the kind of person that when I am part of something, I can’t just sit on the sidelines. I want to play an active role to help make things better and my work supports that.”

 

“Our work in Recreational Sports is so dynamic. We help students prepare themselves professionally while chasing their academic pursuits. For me, coming to the University of Georgia was a chance to start fresh. I got a chance to find ways to get involved in the Athens community. I try to keep in the forefront of my mind, ‘what do I want to be known for?’ and what immediately comes to mind is someone that is known for helping others. Whether it’s supporting students and staff through personal health goals, investing in the community, or participating in programs the University provides– working at the University of Georgia helps me answer that question each day.”

 

Lisa also volunteers within her professional associations, NIRSA: Leaders in Collegiate Recreation and Georgia Recreational Sports Association (GRSA). “The opportunity to help students and staff strive toward their fitness and wellness goals while also making an impact in NIRSA is what I love about my job.” She also currently serves as State Director for the GRSA.

 

What's the coolest thing you've ever done?:

“I think the coolest thing I’ve ever done was winning a state championship in the 300-meter hurdles my senior year of high school, after having only ran the race eight times. The year prior, I ran in the 400-meters, a race that I thought I was best at and didn’t qualify for finals. I was defeated. I remember my older brother made me a ‘motivational poster’ after I lost with a photo from the event and the words ‘Remember this picture and how you felt. Build off of it and know this is not how you want to feel next year!’. After that, I spent the off-season training at least three days a week for five hours a day. I worked so hard and spent so much time training that it made winning the State Championship even sweeter.”

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Engage! Conference F.A.Q.

Frequently Asked Questions


Who attends Engage! Conference?

Staff, faculty, and students from throughout the southeast attend Engage! This includes student affairs professionals that advise students, faculty interested in sharing their research, students interested in entering the field of student affairs, and any others interested in student success!

When is the conference?

Friday, September 27, 2019 from 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Where is the conference?

The keynote and concurrent sessions will be located in the Tate Student Center, located at 45 Baxter St, Athens, GA 30602.

Where can I find a list of presentations?

Click here for more information regarding programs featured at past conferences.

My presentation was selected. What do I need to bring with me and what is provided?

Each session room is outfitted with a projector and screen that is HDMI/VGA compatible. Presenters are responsible for bringing the following:

  • A laptop (laptops will not be provided)
  • Adapter(s) for their laptop
  • Any materials or handouts for those attending their session

Where can I find information regarding conference registration? 

Click here for conference registration information.

Where is check-in?

Check-in is located in Tate Student Center Atrium (3rd floor). 

Where can I park?

We recommend you park at the Tate Student Center Parking Deck (45 Baxter Street, Athens, GA 30605) or the Hull Street Parking Deck (S Hull St, Athens, GA 30605). For more information regarding parking and pricing, click here. Parking is not complimentary.

Will WiFi be available?

The University of Georgia is an "eduroam" campus. If your college/university is also an "eduroam" campus, you will be able to use that login information.

If not, you can use the following directions to connect:

  • Select UGA_Visitors_Wifi
  • After selecting UGA_Visitors_Wifi, a window should open prompting you to sign in. There should be multiple options for you to use to sign in:
    • Log in with a verification code sent via email or text.
      • If selecting this option, you should receive a verification code that can be inputted into the box show.
    • Log in with your Facebook account.
      • If selecting this option, you will be prompted to log in to your Facebook account. After log in, your device should be connected. 

Will meals be included?

Breakfast, lunch, and snacks will be provided. There are also several dining options within the Tate Student Center. If you have any dietary considerations, register early so that we may be able to do our best to accomodate. We cannot guarantee dietary considerations will be accommodated for late/walk-in registrants.

What does the registration fee include?

Registration includes a full day of educational speakers and presentations, conference materials, and meals.

Are hotel accommodations provided?

Conference participants are responsible for booking and securing their own lodging accommodations. Visit the Athens Convention & Visitors Bureau at https://www.visitathensga.com/hotels for a list of nearby hotels.

Have any additional Questions?

Contact us at ugasastaff@uga.edu or 706-542-8229

Engage! Registration FAQ

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Engage! Conference 2017 Keynote Speaker

2017 Keynote - Peter Lake


Peter Lake is professor of law, Charles A. Dana chair and director of the Center for Excellence in Higher Education Law and Policy at Stetson University College of Law. In 2015, he served as the Interim Director of Title IX Compliance at Stetson University.

Professor Lake teaches and writes in the areas of torts, higher education law and policy, insurance, and jurisprudence, and has won several awards for his teaching and scholarship. He is an internationally-recognized expert on higher education law and policy and has been quoted or referred to in the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Chicago Sun Times, The Chronicle of Higher Education, Time, Newsweek, Cosmopolitan, various reported legal decisions including the supreme courts of Virginia and Florida, and the most recent Restatement of the Law of Torts. He has appeared on several major media networks including NPR, ABC and CNN.  Professor Lake has authored numerous law review articles, books, and other publications. Professor Lake is a highly sought after speaker and he has served as a presenter or keynote speaker at several hundred international, national, regional, and local meetings.  He has trained thousands of campus personnel on many student safety issues, including Title IX and his Four Corners of Title IX Regulatory Compliance framework.

Professor Lake is a graduate of Harvard College and Harvard Law School.

 

 

Peter Lake's Keynote: Hot Topics in Higher Education

Peter Lake's Concurrent Session: Navigating Legal Issues in Student Care

Engage! Conference 2018 Keynote Speaker

2018 Keynote- Dr. Jean M. Twenge


Dr. Jean M. Twenge, Professor of Psychology at San Diego State University, is the author of more than 140 scientific publications and the books iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood, Generation Me: Why Today’s Young Americans Are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled — and More Miserable Than Ever Before and The Narcissism Epidemic: Living in the Age of Entitlement (co-authored with W. Keith Campbell). Dr. Twenge frequently gives talks and seminars on teaching and working with today’s young generation based on a dataset of 11 million young people. Her audiences have included college faculty and staff, high school teachers, military personnel, camp directors, and corporate executives. Her research has been covered in Time, Newsweek, The New York Times, USA Today, U.S. News and World Report, and The Washington Post, and she has been featured on Today, Good Morning America, CBS This Morning, Fox and Friends, NBC Nightly News, Dateline NBC, and National Public Radio. She holds a BA and MA from the University of Chicago and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

 

Professor Twenge's keynote address "Connecting with the Super-Connected: How Generational Differences Influence College Student Support" focused on her research about generational differences and their impact on student success, health and wellness, and staff engagement.

 

Staff Spotlights: Nicole McConnell

Nicole McConnell

Assistant Director of the Center for Student Activities & Involvement – Tate Student Center


 

Nicole McConnell is an Assistant Director in the Center for Student Activities & Involvement within the Tate Student Center. In her role, she advises staff and students responsible for large-scale campus programming through University Union’s events and concerts. These programs are designed to help students develop a sense of community here on UGA’s campus. Nicole grew up in the Alpharetta area and has family in the surrounding Atlanta area. She obtained her undergraduate degree in industrial engineering technology at Southern Polytechnic State University (now a part of Kennesaw State University). While there, Nicole was involved within fraternity & sorority life, student government, was a resident assistant and was an orientation leader. It was through her experience in residence life that she realized how the student development experience could create an impact in the lives of other students and the campus community. “In a way, it showed us that our efforts were ‘worth it’. I grew a lot through it and it was nice to see the direct impact of our work.”

 

Nicole stayed at Southern Polytechnic for her Master’s in Business Administration and held an assistantship in Residential Life and Housing. Going into graduate school, her goal was to use her educational experiences to get a job working as a consultant and/or ensuring a plant and production line achieved maximum efficiency. It was during her second year as a graduate assistant when she decided that her true passion was working with and helping students. “I was in my second year and began thinking about ‘what’s next’ when I graduate. I kept coming back to how instrumental student affairs staff were in my undergraduate and graduate careers. Being the first person in your family to go to college can be difficult in so many ways. Whether it ranges from not having enough context for ’what college is about’ to knowing what resources are available to you as a student, it can make you feel a little lost at times.”

 

Nicole attributes where she is today to the staff she met as an undergraduate. “The staff I met during my first year as a student were instrumental in my ability to get involved in student organizations that I was passionate about, make friends, or ultimately be able to look back on my time at Southern Poly and feel like we left a positive mark on it as student leaders. The ability to help other people grow and develop, foster connections and life-long relationships, and the incredible opportunities that lie before them is what drew me to this field.”

 

Before joining us at UGA, Nicole worked in Residential Life & Housing at Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, VA. She attributes her ability to adapt to things that happen “on the fly” at events and programs to her housing experience there. “Being a hall director at VCU gave me a lot of diverse experiences and allowed me to explore different professional development opportunities. I wanted to gain professional experience at another school and in another state so I could step outside my comfort zone. I saw that UGA had this opening in a focus area that I am passionate about and Georgia is ‘home’ to me so it was a no-brainer. Getting to combine the opportunity to be close to family, be a part of UGA, and getting to work with the students we have here made the transition easy. Not only is each day different, but being able to be a part of student lives like student affairs professionals were a part of mine is what I love most. It’s great to be able to see the impact they make in the lives of others as student leaders and, in turn, the impact we as staff have in their lives.”

 

What's the coolest thing you've ever done?:

“I love live music and concerts. When I am not working, I am probably going to a show in Atlanta or Athens. Getting to meet artists is cool; I have been able to meet Fall Out Boy and Zac Brown Band which were both really great. Getting to meet them was really cool!”

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Lifelong Learner Award

Congratulations to the 2020-2021 Lifelong Learner award recipient, Ben Cecil!

 

Ben's nominator had the following to say:

"...Ben Cecil is the ideal candidate for the Student Affairs Lifelong Learner Award. He does outstanding work as the Assistant Director in International Student Life and always has the best interests of our students at the forefront of his thoughts. Ben played an instrumental role in our efforts to support students during the pandemic and actively responded to their needs and concerns. He appropriately advocates for students and effectively utilizes campus partners and resources to maximize assistance to our students-both in good and in difficult times. His work in this area has been instrumental to ISL’s role as the cornerstone of the international student experience here at UGA.

Ben is also a team player in every sense of the word which has been much more evident in his work over the past year. He is currently serving on several collaborative teams charged with implementing various aspects of the SA 2025 strategic plan and has been actively contributing and engaged in these planning efforts. As a result of this work, Ben volunteered to take on additional duties regarding data management and analysis on a divisional level due to staffing changes and reorganization.

Ben has served remarkably in support of the division of Student Affairs data initiatives, specifically in his leadership of the data request process. From the moment Ben was asked if he would be willing to take on the task in addition to his current role, he has diligently, energetically, and expertly performed with aplomb. He is swift in response and timely in fulfillment, maintains excellent communication with me and the requestor, and takes initiative in bringing considerations or new approaches to my attention. Not only does he fulfill his charge well, but he does so with excellent communication and service, providing grace and guidance when appropriate, but always striving to achieve the goals of the requestor, if possible.

Additionally, his service to the Data Collaborative has been exceptional, as well, assisting with content, coordination, and setting the example for engaging in discussion and moving the conversation forward. It is refreshing and inspiring to experience Ben’s effort, discipline, and get-it-done approach, particularly during this most exhausting year.

In addition, Ben volunteered to teach the ECHD 5840 internship class which is one of the requirements for the Leadership in Student Affairs undergraduate minor. Ben has a passion for teaching and has actively engaged in these efforts within ISL. However, it was incredibly helpful and greatly appreciated when Ben volunteered to teach this course during the spring semester when the instructor of record left the University. He is doing an outstanding job with this class and works diligently to provide sound curriculum and strong learning experiences for the students enrolled in this course. 

While Ben has positively contributed to Student Affairs here at UGA, he is also actively involved in international education on a regional and national level. Ben is viewed as an expert in transitional programming and engagement for international students and is often called up to conduct presentations and workshops for professional associations. He has been responsible for an international symposium at NASPA for several years and is involved on the state level as well. Ben positively represents Student Affairs in this work and is a valuable member of our campus community.

Lastly, Ben further embodies the Student Affairs Lifelong Learner Award because he continues to seek out ways to improve his professional skillsets and his knowledge of higher education. This has been most evident in his diligent efforts to progress through the Institute of Higher Education’s doctoral program. In our opinion, Ben truly depicts and models how a lifelong learner should approach his/her work and we couldn’t be prouder to put forth this nomination in celebration of all that he has accomplished.”

 


Recipient: Individual

Work with someone who is always trying to learn something new? Are you someone that loves to tie in learning with your work?

This award recognizes an individual in the Division who has made an effort to invest in the growth of themselves and others through volunteer role(s) on campus, service to a regional or national organization, conference presentations, research or publication. This individual has positively represented UGA Student Affairs at a local, regional, or national level through their engagement in, and promotion of, lifelong learning and development.

Nominations will be evaluated according to one or more of the following criteria:

  • Modeling an example of excellence for staff and students by serving in volunteer positions within a professional local, regional, or inter/national committee or board
  • Contributing to their field through leadership and/or volunteer role(s), conference presentations, or digital/print publications
  • Encouraging staff to represent UGA Student Affairs at the regional or national level
  • Nominee serves as a UGA Student Affairs staff member at time of nomination

Previous Award Winners

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Awards

The Student Affairs Staff Awards, given to deserving staff across the division and the University, recognize outstanding accomplishments and leadership in student affairs at the University of Georgia.

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Guide to Supervisory Meetings

Supervisors and supervisees are expected to engage in a minimum of four meetings a year. These meetings should last at least 30 minutes and should take place in a mutually agreed upon space, which may be the office of either the supervisor or the supervisee. Click below for guides specific to each meeting. 

Printable Guide to Supervisory Meetings

Expectations and Goals (November/December)

Annual Review (January/February)

Review and Check-In I (April/May/June)

Review and Check-In II (August/September)

Student Affairs Supervision

Two Student Affairs professionals chat on chairs outside the Tate Student Center.

The Student Affairs Supervision Guidelines are designed to assist supervisors and supervisees in building quality professional relationships, supported by continual communication that builds trust and encourages productive feedback.

On this page, you will find resources related to supervisory meetings within UGA Student Affairs. 

Guide to Supervisory Meetings

Supervisors and supervisees are expected to engage in a minimum of four meetings a year. Click here for a guide to these quarterly meetings.

Record of Supervisory Meetings

Linked-In Learning Courses for Supervisors

Staff Spotlights: Michael Wharton

Michael Wharton

Building Controls Engineering Analyst – University Housing


 

Cultivate your ideas. Volunteer to serve on collaborative groups. Never stop learning – keep your skills state-of-the-art. Remember to keep your focus broad – you really are an important part of a larger effort.

 

Michael Wharton works in University Housing as a Building Controls Engineering Analyst. He has been a staff member at UGA since 2008. Michael has been working with electronics for over 40 years and recalls taking things apart and putting them back together since he was nine years old. Before moving to Athens, he gained a wide range of work experiences. His experiences ranged from being an engineer that maintained and calibrated a mainframe-computer disk production line to working in IT systems administration and many other branches of electronics. “After moving to Athens in 1989, I have always had UGA on my radar. I was seeking a position at UGA that would utilize both my IT and electronics skill sets. In 2008, I started as a Systems Administrator for Card Services and in 2011 joined Housing, where I now serve Student Affairs as a Building Controls Engineering Analyst.”

 

When asked what he loved most about working in UGA Student Affairs, he said: “Working behind the scenes, so to speak, at Student Affairs can have a far-reaching impact on the lives of our students. Fueled by innovation and discovery, this university has numerous research projects that our students participate in. Their success is partly dependent on the facilities and programs that we support. Behind the scenes, we keep things running, graduating class after graduating class. Working together with the numerous Student Affairs folks to support our students provides me with a great amount of satisfaction daily.”

 

If he could give a piece of advice to staff as they start out their journey in UGA Student Affairs it would be: “Cultivate your ideas. Volunteer to serve on collaborative groups. Never stop learning – keep your skills state-of-the-art. Remember to keep your focus broad – you really are an important part of a larger effort.” Interviewing Michael in the low-voltage shop, it’s easy to see someone who has not only mastered their craft, but is also curious – always seeking new information and not afraid to take something apart to see how it works. “I’m excited to be a part of a collaborative group that is leading the way to securing our campus card technology, and how it influences our students’ campus experience. Due to the technology’s innovative and leading edge nature, my hope is that our campus will become a model that other organizations will seek out to potentially adopt.”

 

What's the coolest thing you've ever done?:

“Flight training and getting my pilot’s license. Flying demands precision and skill that involves coordinating many simultaneous inputs coming at you in real-time. There’s no ‘pulling over’ to stop and think; you must be automatic in your responses – even under extreme duress. There’s nothing that compares to the feeling of accelerating down the runway, pulling back on the elevator control, and leaving the ground – it’s one heck of an endorphin rush!”

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Innovate Teams

Congratulations 2018 Innovate Teams!


Staff from across UGA Student Affairs gathered December 18-20, 2018 to address some of the division's critical questions. During the three-day modified Design Sprint (a model developed at Google Ventures), team members identified innovative solutions to pressing challenges, engaged in mutual learning, and built and strengthened relationships. The following solutions were presented to Student Affairs leadership on December 20, 2018 and are currently under review.

  • How can we more effectively engage and serve the graduate and professional student populations?
    • Innovate Team Solution: GRADSuccess Model
  • How can we more fully engage, support, and connect UGA’s online learners?
    • Innovate Team Solution: Digital Dawgs Framework
  • How do we advance a more integrated strategy to improve the success and campus life experience of underrepresented students?
    • Innovate Team Solution: Pathways for Access
  • What strategies can we adopt to enhance supervision within UGA Student Affairs?
    • Innovate Team Solution: Supervision Cycle and Checklist

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Previous Engage! Conference Information

2018


Keynote Speaker: Dr. Jean M. Twenge

 

2017


Keynote Speaker: Peter Lake

 

2016

Previously titled "Annual Professional Enrichment Conference"

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Cindi Love

 

2015

Previously titled "Annual Professional Enrichment Conference"

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Susan Komives

 

2014

Previously titled "Annual Professional Enrichment Conference"

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Margaret J. Barr

  • 2014 Keynote: Dealing Effectively with Change

 

2013

Previously titled "Annual Professional Enrichment Conference"

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Pamela Havice

  • 2013 Keynote: The Contemporary College Student: Yesterday, Today, and the Future
  • 2013 Keynote Concurrent Session: Using Generational Knowledge on Your Campus

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Engage! Conference 2019 Schedule

Interested in joining us for Engage! Conference 2020?

See below for the 2019 schedule

 


 8:00am – 8:30am:    Registration, Check-In, and Continental Breakfast

 8:30am – 10:00am:  Welcome and Keynote Address

10:00am – 10:15am:  Break

10:15am – 11:00am:  Concurrent Session 1

11:00am – 11:15am:  Break

11:15am – 12:00pm:  Concurrent Session 2

12:00pm – 1:15pm:   Lunch and Featured Session

  1:15pm – 2:00pm:   Concurrent Session 3

  2:00pm – 2:15pm:   Break

  2:15pm – 3:00pm:   Concurrent Session 4

  3:00pm – 4:15pm:   Engage! Bash

Engage! Conference 2019 Program Guide

Click the "View Programs" button to the right to view what programs will be at this year's conference.

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Engage! Conference Program Sessions

Share your talents with us at Engage! Conference 2020

Interested in presenting? Keep and eye on this space for submissions to open in early Spring 2020.

Check out our accepted programs below!


Each year, we host incredible presenters and attendees from throughout the Southeast region at the Engage! Conference. One of the best aspects about Engage! is the ability to meet and learn from Student Affairs practitioners from different content areas, institutions, backgrounds, and years of experience. We hope that you will join us in commiting to the growth and development of the region's professionals by submitting a program presentation for Engage! Conference 2020!

 

Interested in seeing what programs were at Engage! Conference 2019?

Below is a list of programs that will be at Engage! Conference 2019. Each year, the Engage! Conference features a jam-packed day of learning and networking led by keynote speakers and presenters representing institutions from throughout the Southeast.

 


To view the program guide from Engage! Conference 2019, click the link below.

Questions? Contact us at 706-542-8229 or ugasastaff@uga.edu

Engage! Conference 2019 Program Guide

Click the "View Programs" button to the right to view what programs will be at this year's conference.

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Engage! Conference Registration

 

Thanks for a successful Engage! Conference 2019

Keep your eye on this space for information about registering for Engage! Conference 2020!

 


Registration Fees

Registration includes conference registration attendance, materials, lunch, and refreshments. Registration fees are non-refundable. If you are unable to attend the conference, you are welcome to transfer your registration to another colleague.

  • General registration: $85
  • UGA affiliates and alumni: $60
  • UGA Student Affairs staff, current UGA students, CSAA faculty, and Selected Presenters: Complimentary

 


 

Please contact Jennifer Erickson-Brown at 706-542-8229 or email ugasastaff@uga.edu with any questions, or check out our Registration FAQ.

Engage! Registration FAQ

Engage! Conference 2019 Program Guide

Click the "View Programs" button to the right to view what programs will be at this year's conference.

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Engage! Conference 2019 Keynote Speaker

 

2019 Keynote Speaker- Dr. Karen Reivich


Keynote:

Dr. Reivich's keynote address "Cultivating Resilience and Optimism" will focus on her research in the University of Pennsylvania Resilience and Well-Being Program and highlight the major findings along with exploring ways to foster resilience among students.

 

Featured Session:

Dr. Reivich's Featured Concurrent Session "Challenging Counterproductive Patterns in Thinking" will dive-deeper into her research and provide participants the space to explore how counterproductive patterns might undercut resilience. 

 

About Dr. Reivich:

Dr. Karen Reivich is the Director of Training Programs for the Penn Positive Psychology Center, and is the lead instructor and curriculum developer for the Penn Resilience Programs. Dr. Reivich is also an instructor in the Penn Master of Applied Positive Psychology program (MAPP). She has a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of Pennsylvania.
 
Dr. Reivich is a leading expert in the fields of resilience, depression prevention, and Positive Psychology. She has extensive experience in the science and training of resilience and Positive Psychology principles. She has co-authored two books on resilience and optimism, has published extensively in peer reviewed scholarly journals, and edited books in the areas of Positive Psychology and resilience. Dr. Reivich has more than 25 years of experience developing and delivering resilience and Positive Psychology programs to educators, and has been the lead instructor for more than 200 Penn Resilience Programs that have included approximately 10,000 people. She has supervised the delivery of more than 300 Penn Resilience Programs to numerous organizations, including schools, the U.S. Army, and a professional sports organization.
 
Dr. Reivich’s work focuses on helping parents, educators, and leaders to promote resilience and well-being in adolescents and adults. For 20 years, she was a Co-Principal Investigator of several research studies of the Penn Resilience Programs funded by the National Institute of Mental Health and the U.S. Department of Education.
 
Dr. Reivich’s scholarly publications have appeared in academic journals including Psychological Science, Journal of Early Adolescence, School Psychology Quarterly, Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, and Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. She is a co-author of the books The Optimistic Child and The Resilience Factor.
 
Dr. Reivich and her work have been featured in a variety of news and media outlets including Oprah, Prime Time Live, The Early Show, ABC Nightly News, The Big Idea with Donny Deutsch, Parenting Magazine, The New York Times, US News and World Report, Better Homes and Gardens, The Boston Globe, The Philadelphia Inquirer, US Today, and The Orlando Sentinel.

 

 

 

2019 Lunch Keynote - Christina Foard


 

Keynote:

Christina's keynote address "Imagination Squared: Pathways to Resilience" will showcase her ongoing project that connects UGA to the community of Athens, GA through collecting public perceptions of resilience through symbols, sounds, and stories. 


Featured Session:

Christina's Featured Concurrent Session "Imagination Squared: Pathway to Resilience" will dive deeper into the Imagination Squared project and provide attendees the opportunity to reflect on their own resilience through symbols, sounds, and stories.

 

About Christina Foard:

Christina Foard has 25+ years non-profit program management experience and is a Graduate Teaching Assistant in the Lamar Dodd School of Art’s MFA program at UGA. Foard’s early career was centered on communications and new-media in the Washington DC area, then shifted towards arts administration roles directing programming and curriculum for art museums and arts in medicine programs in Jacksonville, FL. Foard is an artist represented by several galleries in the US and has been in over 35 group exhibitions nationally and internationally and 8 solo exhibitions in the past decade. Foard is a permanent resident of Athens, GA and her partner is on faculty at UGA. Their five children/step-children are currently enrolled in undergraduate programs around the US.

 

Click here to read about previous Engage! Keynote Speakers.

Engage! Conference Registration

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Engage! Conference presented by UGA Student Affairs

 

 

Canceled

September 18, 2020

 

We look forward to seeing you next year at Engage! Conference 2021!


 

Explore ways to create vibrant learning communities for students!

Engage! Conference is a one-day conference designed for academic and student affairs professionals, support staff, and campus partners from institutions across the Southeast to gather for a day of learning and professional development. Engage! Conference 2019 featured more than 30 sessions in a day of professional development, innovative thinking, and networking. We look forward to having you join us at Engage! Conference 2020!

Interested in presenting at Engage! Conference 2020? Questions about Engage! Conference 2020? Contact us at 706-542-8229 or ugasastaff@uga.edu.

 

Institutions Represented at Previous Engage! Conferences:

  • Atlanta Technical College
  • Auburn University
  • Augusta University
  • Brenau University
  • Clayton State University
  • Clemson University
  • Coastal College of Georgia
  • Emory University
  • Georgia College and State University
  • Georgia Gwinnett College
  • Georgia Institute of Technology
  • Georgia State University
  • Georgia Southern
  • Gwinnett Technical College
  • Kennesaw State University
  • Life University
  • Middle Georgia State University
  • Ohio State University
  • Old Dominion University
  • Piedmont College
  • South Georgia State College
  • Stetson University
  • University of Georgia
  • University of Kentucky
  • University of North Georgia
  • University of South Carolina
  • University of West Georgia
  • Valdosta State University
  • Vanderbilt University

Engage! Conference 2019 Program Guide

Click the "View Programs" button to the right to view what programs will be at this year's conference.

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Staff Spotlights: Laronda Faust

Laronda Faust

Building Services Manager– University Housing


 

My hope is to provide the reader with a chance to reflect on how strong they truly are and what they can accomplish through healing.

 

Laronda is from Athens, GA and is a Building Services Worker in University Housing, specializing in Rooker Hall (located within East Campus Village, or “ECV,” for short). Laronda, like many of her building services peers, plays a critical role impacting the lives of students in a way that you might not initially recognize. Laronda works to ensure the space in which UGA’s students are living is a space that promotes learning and engagement. She enables students to feel like their residence hall is a home away from home. When it comes to developing thriving communities for our students, incredible staff members like Laronda help see that mission to fruition.

 

When you talk with Laronda, she is quick to note that there are so many things that she loves about her work that at times it’s hard to pick a favorite. Of the many, she said, “From my experience, it’s nice to have leadership that cares about us and to have supervisors that encourage us to grow. They see us as more than just a Building Services Worker or just someone that cleans things.” Laronda’s ability to seek potential growth opportunities is contagious. “Whether it is a workshop or a news article, I try my best to soak up as much as I possibly can. Working at a university is an incredible chance to learn and grow. I want to be as prepared as possible as a leader so that if I ever get the chance to be a supervisor,  I can invest in others the way that each of my supervisors has invested in me since I’ve been here.”

 

Her nominator wrote: “Laronda is great to work with. Whether it is her strong work ethic, exceptional standard for her work, or her desire to always learn more,she helps inspire others to provide great service to our students. Her passion for life is contagious and the impact she makes in the lives of those around her—students and staff alike--is immeasurable. It’s people like her that make working at UGA great!“

 

Besides work and being a parent, Laronda keeps busy with many different hobbies. Whether it’s arts and crafts, styling, interior decorating, or painting, she loves being able to use many different outlets to flex her creativity. “I am even in the process of completing a book about emotional healing. My hope is to provide the reader with a chance to reflect on how strong they truly are and what they can accomplish through healing. It’s my hope to complete it and get published. Not only to accomplish a goal I set for myself but so that way my children and children’s children have something to remember me by.”

 

What's the coolest thing you've ever done?: 

“Right now I would say writing a book. It’s a chance for me to challenge myself to continue to learn and grow. I have to make time to work on it and it’s nice to have something for me to continue to invest in and to complete different writing goals I have for myself.”

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Dusty Jackson

Dusty Jackson

Coordinator for Fitness and Wellness – Recreational Sports


 

There’s so much history and tradition here. It’s nice to be able to work at my alma mater. Not only is my work, in some way, a part of its history but I get to contribute to its future.

Dusty works in Recreational Sports as the Coordinator for Fitness & Wellness, and is a “Double Dawg.” Dusty grew up playing baseball in Mableton, GA, a sport that inspired him to pursue his undergraduate degree in sports science. After an injury in high school, he saw his future in baseball changing. Seeking an outlet, he soon discovered another passion – competitive weightlifting. “I have always been very fascinated with the science behind the human body and how it works, so it felt natural to pursue sports science. Being able to get into weight lifting enabled me to stay in shape and fed my hunger to learn more about the human body.”

 

For someone that loves UGA so much, it might be surprising to hear that Dusty did not start out his undergraduate career as a Bulldog. As a transfer student to UGA from Gainesville State College (now University of North Georgia – Gainesville Campus), getting a student staff member job at Ramsey Student Center helped him transition to his new school. “Coming to Georgia, I was comfortable with college but still didn’t know many people. Getting a job as a student here in Recreational Sports had such a profound impact on my college career. Through it, I made friends, got to feel like I was a part of something bigger, and it helped me come into my own as a student and a person.”

 

After graduating with his master’s in Kinesiology, Dusty took a position at Kennesaw State but Georgia stuck with him; when a position opened up the Coordinator for Fitness & Wellness, he applied, and the rest is history. “I know it’s kind of cliché but I feel lucky. There are some great people that work here and together we get to do some impactful work in the lives of others. We get to see students come in as first-years and watch them develop. We get to be a part of their lives. I imagine it’s what being a proud parent feels like – they own their successes through their hard work and we get to play a part in it in some way. It’s incredible.”

 

Although he joined UGA Student Affairs as a professional staff member within the last year, the impact Dusty is already making in Recreational Sports hasn’t gone unnoticed. His nominator writes, “Dusty is a double dawg who has been a member of the #UGARAMFAM since he was a student employee in the department of Recreational Sports serving as a strength & conditioning staff member, group fitness instructor, personal trainer, and facility operations senior manager. He recently joined (December 2017) our professional staff as the Fitness & Wellness Coordinator after working at Kennesaw State University for two years. He brings wonderful energy to his work and has made a profound impact on the student employees he works with daily in his first six months of employment at UGA!“

 

“What’s the coolest thing you’ve ever done?”:

“The coolest thing I have ever done is I went skydiving last year (2017). It’s a freeing experience to be able to jump out of a plane and float there looking at the world. They let my pull my own parachute cord so I got a chance to say ‘I did this;’ that was pretty cool.”

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

University Health Center Executive Director Named

Photo of Dr. Garth Russo

Garth Russo named Executive Director of the University Health Center

Garth Russo, who has served as interim executive director of the University of Georgia Health Center since February 2018, has been appointed to the post on a permanent basis.  

Russo has been leading the University Health Center as interim executive director since Jean Chin retired this past January. Russo comes to the position after decades of service to the university, having joined the health center in 1991 and serving as senior director of medical services prior to this appointment.

Russo will provide strategic leadership for all aspects of the operation of the University Health Center, including the provision of medical, mental health and counseling services, health promotion and educational outreach programs, and clinical support services. He will also be responsible for the direction of administrative support services, fiscal and facility management, and collaboration with campus and community stakeholders on health and wellness matters, including public health and emergency management and planning.

Russo’s appointment is effective August 1. He will report directly to the vice president for student affairs and serve as a member of the leadership team for the Division of Student Affairs.

“Dr. Russo’s expertise and understanding of the health center’s medical operations is extensive," said Victor K. Wilson, vice president for student affairs. “His long tenure of service gives him invaluable historical perspective and personal investment to continue the health center’s growth into one of the top college health operations in the world.”

One of only 17 Joint Commission accredited college health centers, the University Health Center is the on-campus medical hub of the University of Georgia, providing care for UGA’s more than 36,000 students, along with UGA faculty and staff in selected service areas.

The health center currently employs a staff of nearly 300, operates with an annual budget of approximately $25 million, and occupies a state-of-the-art medical facility of more than 110,000 square feet on the university’s East Campus.

In 2016, the University Health Center achieved Primary Care Medical Home accreditation and was fully reaccredited for all services by the Joint Commission. The recognition is the second consecutive time the center received a flawless report of findings.

Russo says that all of these resources and excellent staff are in support of a healthy university community, emphasizing the health center’s dedication to students and their families.

“Students may be navigating the healthcare system for the first time without their parents,” he said. “They can trust that we understand, and we assure them that the health center is prepared to serve as their health and wellness home away from home.”

Russo brings more than 30 years of experience in health services. He joined the health center after serving 4 years in the National Health Service Corps in North Georgia. He has interests in wilderness medicine and clinical IT and serves as the medical information officer for the health center.

Russo received his Medical Doctor degree from the Bowman Gray School of Medicine and completed a family medicine residency with the East Carolina University School of Medicine. He is Board Certified in family medicine and clinical informatics and is a licensed physician for the State of Georgia.

The Office of the
Vice President
for Student Affairs

306 Memorial Hall
Athens, GA 30602
706-542-3564
askstudentaffairs@uga.edu

 

Directions

From the Tate Center Parking Deck, take the elevator to the 3 rd floor. Walk across the courtyard with the UGA bookstore on your left hand side. Take the stairs up to the street. Cross Sanford Drive. Memorial Hall will be directly in front of you. Stay on the left side of the building and walk around to the side entrance for disability access. From the side door you can take the elevator to the third floor. If an elevator is not needed walk up all the stairs on the side of Memorial Hall and turn right, there you will see Reed Quad. Walk up the steps with the columns to the main entrance of the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.

For directions please call 706-542- 3564.

Staff Spotlights: Hannah Mountford

Hannah Mountford

Residence Hall Director - Brumby Hall, University Housing


 

For Hannah, all it took was coming to campus for her interview to quickly know that she wanted to call the University of Georgia her next home.

 

“I had interviewed at other schools, and they were great, but when I came to [UGA’s] campus for my interview, I just knew. I knew this is exactly where I needed to be…I even called my mentor on the way home and told them it had to be UGA,” she said with a smile. “It threw my friends for a loop, because not only do I love the outdoors, but I love the snow and snowboarding. At UW-La Crosse, I was the president of our ski and snowboarding club, so when I went to graduate school in Mississippi and now have a job in Georgia -  it took people a second…they all figured I would end up somewhere cold and snowy.”

 

Hannah Mountford joined UGA Student Affairs in July 2015 and she currently works as the Residence Hall Director for Brumby Hall in University Housing. Prior to joining the UGA family, she completed her Masters of Science in Counselor Education with an Emphasis on Student Affairs at Mississippi State University. When you meet Hannah, it comes as no surprise that her undergraduate degree from University of Wisconsin – La Crosse is in Interpersonal Relationships. 

 

Each day is a gift that brings with it so much opportunity.

 

When asked about what her ideal work day looked like she said, “My favorite moments, or the ones I look forward to most, are when I get a chance to have a deep conversation with someone. I love spending time with students and getting a sense for what’s happening in their lives.” She was quick to note that her response might sound “cliché” but she finds the greatest connection and satisfaction in getting to know the people she works with on a deeper level. “There’s also an opportunity for adventure. Anyone I work with will tell you ‘adventure’ is my favorite word. Each day is a gift that brings with it so much opportunity. Whether it’s switching up where a one-on-one meeting is held or just saying ‘yes’- there’s always a chance for each day to be the best and that’s exciting to me.”

 

When asked what she loved most about working in UGA Student Affairs, she didn’t hesitate. “I love the level of care our staff have for the students here…At any school, you are going to find greatness in students, but you might not be as lucky to find as many dedicated and passionate staff invested in them as we have here at UGA. It’s inspiring to know I have colleagues that share a passion for helping students and make an effort to connect and partner.”

 

Favorite Spot on Campus: “A bunch of places, but definitely the fireplace courtyard at the Georgia Center”

Her Staff Spotlight Nominator Wrote: 

While I think that we work with some really talented people here at UGA, Hannah, the RHD over in Brumby Hall, was the first person that came to mind. She’s one of those people that you just can’t help but gravitate towards because of her positive outlook and ability to make others feel welcome. I also really appreciate her work ethic and investment in the student experience.

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Mary Eberhard

Mary Eberhard

Senior Accountant/Ticket Manager - Office of the Dean of Students


 

Mary Eberhard works in the Dean of Students Business Office as a Senior Accountant/Ticket Manager and has lived in Athens and the state of Georgia for most of her life. Growing up, her father was a professor in the College of Journalism and Mass Communication and still teaches a First Year Odyssey course whenever he can. When asked what it was like to grow up in Athens, she said,“Who doesn’t love Athens? It's wonderful to see how much the town is impacted by the hard work of the students."

 

It wasn't hard for Mary to consider her favorite thing about working at UGA in UGA Student Affairs.“I think my favorite thing about working here, besides the students, is that everyone is willing to help each other. The support you get from other staff is incredible.” She added, “I love how there always seems to be some sort of connection [between staff]. Kinda like the Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon…sometimes it’s being born from the same town or knowing someone’s college friends; there’s a nice family-connection feeling among staff that adds to all of us being Bulldogs together.”

 

Mary’s contagious optimism led to her nominator writing:

Mary greets each person with a smile and helps all folks--students and staff alike--the best way she knows how. I enjoy the interactions I have with her and the knowledge she's given to me throughout the years. She's been a great support for my staff and student leaders.

 

Mary has always had a passion for sports and athletics. Before coming to UGA, she worked for the Atlanta Braves during their World Series run and was on staff during the 1996 the Olympics in Atlanta. One of her favorite memories was being a part of the Braves staff when the first game after September 11th took place. “It was incredible to see how much the country rallied around one another in the moment of such immense tragedy.” While being a part of monumental aspects of Georgia sports history brings a smile to Mary’s face, nothing compares to what she calls her “Mom Moments.” Getting to see her son be a part of Dawg Walk and win Jr. Homecoming King or taking him to ring the Chapel Bell after big victories in the 2017 football season are the top mom moments of the year (so far). “My son was waiting in line with us [to ring the Chapel Bell] and an alumnus was in line behind us. He told us how thrilled he was to get to share this opportunity with our family and all the Bulldogs in line. He had waited years and years since he was in undergraduate to ring the Bell again and felt like this moment was the right time. He said, ‘Im jealous. I wish I got to do something like this when I was your age! I had to wait until I was way older!’ It meant the world to my son to be able to experience that and in turn meant the world to me.”

 

Favorite Spot on Campus: The patio outside of the 3rd floor of the Tate Student Center, a location some staff affectionately call “The Resort.” “It’s a great spot to read a book, get a little sunshine, and still be in the thick of everything,” Mary said.

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Jaci Hawkins

Jaci Hawkins

Graduate Assistant - Center for Leadership and Service


 

Jaci is currently a graduate student in the College Student Affairs Administration program and has an assistantship in the Center for Leadership and Service. She went to University of California – Santa Barbara and was a resident assistant and student athlete during her undergraduate career. When asked why she chose to work at UGA and, more particularly, why Student Affairs she said, “It’s inspiring to see the ways in which education inside and outside the classroom provides authentic moments to help someone learn and grow.”

 

There’s a sense of familiarity when you meet Jaci. Her passion for working in Student Affairs and supporting students is nothing short of contagious. Her infectious laugh and desire to get to know who you are as a person has the power to create a space where you feel like you can be yourself, embodying her mantra of, “Live your life, live your truth.”

 

Her nominator wrote:

Jaci is one of the most selfless individuals I have met. She is always willing to help those around her and treats each person that she meets like family. I appreciate her for doing so much not only for our students, but for her peers and colleagues alike.

 

When asked about her nominator’s words—in particular, whether she felt like her desire to help others came easy to her, she said: “I was raised to help others and to leave people better than I found them. I’m always hoping to be a positive and genuine person in people’s lives. There’s something inspiring when you are working with a student that might disagree with you on a deep level, but in their heart, they know you care about them as a person and that you are invested in their success. That they are worth your time. There’s a lot of opportunity there for both of us to learn and grow.” She continued, “I think that there’s a lot of impact in utilizing social justice and mental health education to support our students: Embrace them where they are and show them they are worth it. It’s important to me that a student, even one I might not agree with or even understand, knows that I see value in them and that our tough conversations are rooted in our connected humanity.”

 

“What’s the coolest thing you’ve ever done?”: 

"Taking the chance to get my motorcycle license when I was 19. It was so funny to be the only female identified person in the class out there, riding our motorcylces and being awesome. That’s definitely my favorite “surprise fact" about me whenever people ask."

 

Favorite Spot on Campus: Aderhold Hall. “I love Aderhold because at any moment I am going to learn something about myself, about others, or ways to help others. Each day brings a chance to grow as person. Honorable mention for The Intersection; I love the space it provides for UGA’s students.”

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Tori Whitaker

Tori Whitaker

Accommodated Testing Specialist – Disability Resource Center


 

Tori is an Accommodated Testing Specialist in the Disability Resource Center and has been in UGA Student Affairs for almost four years. Before joining the Division of Student Affairs, Tori was an undergraduate at the University of Georgia and majored in Sociology. Growing up in Lawrenceville, Tori says that she never really had much of a choice in becoming a Bulldog. “Both of my grandmothers used to work here and my parents went to school here ­— it was never in question that, if I got in, I would be going to school anywhere but here.” 

 

It's exciting to work together with them to find a solution that best supports them and their needs

 

Tori chose to major in Sociology because of her curiosity to learn more about “why” and discover the patterns that exist behind people and their behaviors. Such a curiosity has inspired her to find new ways to support students so they may be as successful throughout their time here at UGA. When asked what she loved most about her job she said, “I like being able to be there for students and find solutions to help them succeed in the classroom. Many of the students we see have barriers with things that some might take for granted, like taking an exam online. It's exciting to work together with them to find a solution that best supports them and their needs. Each day is different and in turn it helps me be a better professional.” When asked for an example, she said, “We have a student that recently showed us a web browser extension that helps students read questions that are shown in an online exam. Sometimes the platform that tests are in might not be compatible with our assistive technology software, but this new one helps students by allowing them to highlight the question and reading the question out to them. They might not be able to read a question for a variety of reasons, but this software can enable them to hear what the text on the screen says and answer the question accordingly; it’s great!”

 

Expressing that level of care and compassion for others comes naturally for Tori and was highlighted by her nominator:

Tori is a Disability Resource Center's Accommodated Testing Specialist and she is AMAZING. She is a role model to her student workers and she leads by example with her professionalism and customer service. Tori is well respected by faculty and students as she has the ability to adapt to their individualized testing needs without missing a beat.

 

Tori says that the food and music scene is her favorite part about living in Athens. “You can eat at a chain if you want to, but living here you get to try food that you might never try otherwise.” When asked what advice she had for new staff, she said it was important to find the time to get out and explore Athens. “It’s a town that can show you so much about other people and yourself. There’s so much to do and see; you just need to put yourself out there.”

 

Favorite Spot on Campus: Herty Field

“What’s the coolest thing you’ve ever done?”: 

"While studying abroad in undergrad, I spent some time backpacking in Austria and Germany. It was incredible. Not only because of what it taught me about other people and cultures but because of what it taught me about myself. I learned how to be self-reliant and appreciate my abilities. I've always been kind of curious about myself and others while also willing to try new things but this took it up to a new level!"

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights: Taylor Cain

Taylor Cain

Associate Director of the Tate Student Center and Director of the Center for Student Activities & Involvement – Tate Student Center


 

If I had one word to describe how I feel about working at the University of Georgia, I’d say … ‘grateful.’Grateful for the chance to grow while helping provide others the space to do the same.

 

Taylor has been a staff member in UGA Student Affairs since 2013. Prior to joining us, she completed her bachelor’s and master’s degrees at the University of South Carolina. While there, she majored in history and was an involved student leader within Student Government Association, University Housing, and more. Taylor grew up in Gaston, SC, just outside of Columbia.  When you add together being born and raised in South Carolina and attending the state’s flagship institution, you would think that Taylor might have a bit of a tough time becoming a Bulldog. That hasn’t been the case, though.

 

“Athens and UGA were quick to feel like home for me. At first, I was surprised, but I shouldn’t have been. When you take the charm that this town has and combine it with an institution that provides the opportunity to work with some impressive folks, you’re bound to fall in love.”

 

As with all Staff Spotlight interviews, the person being interviewed picks their favorite spot on campus to have their interview. Taylor chose Old College as her favorite place on campus. “I felt like picking Tate [Student Center] since it’s where I get to see our work come to life, but the story I was told by an Arch Society Member about Old College has me entranced by it. He said that in the early history of the University, they chose to build Old College so that both the north and south sides of the building presented as if they were the ’front of the building.' They wanted it to be adaptable for whichever direction the University developed. That story stuck with me. I guess you could say such a tale has helped me grow as a person and professional.” She added,, “I think it’s important for us as student affairs professionals to be adaptable to whatever direction our students go. Being able to recognize that we as leaders are ’not finished‘ and that in order for us to be our best--for the best students in the country--we need to be able to say ‘We’re here. We’re ready to help you. Tell us where we are going.’ and help them accomplish their dreams. ”

 

When asked what made her fall in love with UGA, she said, “It’s the people that work here and their care for one another. It’s the students and the impact their passions have on their community and the surrounding state. When you’re helping a student, it’s more than just a one-on-one or a big concert– you’re helping them learn and grow as they create a life here, if only for a few years, so they might go on to make a difference in the lives of others. That’s pretty incredible when you think about it. ”

 

“What’s the coolest thing you’ve ever done?”:

“The coolest thing I’ve ever done, without a doubt, is marrying my wife. Plain and simple. That might be cliché but it’s the truth. It’s not every day that you get to marry the woman of your dreams.”

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Spotlights

In UGA Student Affairs, each and every staff member is more than "just" their title or position in the division. The contributions they make and the impact they have when inspiring students to engage meaningfully, grow intellectually, and build their character goes beyond just their job description. Staff Spotlights were created to recognize and celebrate the stories of the incredible staff that work in UGA Student Affairs. Nominated staff are interviewed and we're honored to share their stories in the Staff Matters email newsletter and here on the website. 

 


 

Check out their stories at the Staff Spotlights below:

  • Wes Summers, Student Affairs Digital Engagement Lead, Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs
  • Matt Weido, Residence Hall Director, University Housing
  • Mildred Anderson, Human Resources Manager, University Housing
  • Gary Glasser, Physician for the Gynecology Clinic, University Health Center
  • Tate Student Crew, Tate Student Center
  • Charles Clark, Coordinator for Event Services, Tate Student Center
  • Tanesha Hitchcock, Front Desk Associate, Disability Resource Center & Student Care and Outreach
  • Rosendo Alvarezarmenta, IT Senior Manager, University Housing
  • Sarah Kesler, Senior Administrative Manager, Disability Resource Center & University Testing Services
  • Brian Williams, Senior Associate Director for Facilities, Recreational Sports
  • The Tate Facilities Team, Tate Student Center
  • Maggie Fitzsimmons, Coordinator for Facilities, Recreational Sports
  • Tim Smith, Student Affairs Information Technology Lead, Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs
  • Missy Jackson, Nurse Practitioner, University Health Center
  • Worth VanLinden, Coordinator for Greek Housing Management, University Housing/Greek Life
  • Carolyn Arnold, Assistant Director for Disability Services, University Housing
  • Al JeffersAssociate Director for Facilities Operations, University Housing
  • Liana Natochy, Alcohol and Other Drugs Education Coordinator, University Health Center
  • Lance Haynie, Associate Director, Recreational Sports
  • Lori Crawford, Assistant Director, Tate Student Center - Center for Student Activities and Involvement
  • Ricky Boggs, Area Coordinator, University Housing - Myers and Hill Communities
  • Lisa Williamson, Assistant Director for Fitness and Wellness, Recreational Sports
  • Nicole McConnell, Assistant Director of the Center for Student Activities & Involvement, Tate Student Center
  • Michael Wharton, Building Controls Engineering Analyst, University Housing
  • Laronda Faust, Business Services Lead, University Housing
  • Taylor CainAssociate Director of the Tate Student Center and Director of the Center for Student Activities & Involvement, Tate Student Center
  • Tori Whitaker, Accomodated Testing Specialist, Disabilitiy Resource Center
  • Mary EberhardSenior Accountant/Ticket Manager, Office of the Dean of Students

 


 

Want to recognize a colleague for their impact on the UGA community? Nominate them for a Staff Spotlights feature at the link below! 

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Awards Selection Process

  • Nominations for Student Affairs Staff Awards may be submitted by all current Student Affairs staff, including student assistants. Self-nominations are welcome.
  • Following the nomination deadline, nominees in all categories are posted on the Staff Awards website.
  • For the Vice President’s Dwight Douglas Award, there are no formal nominees. The Vice President or a designee will independently determine the recipient.
  • For all other awards, an initial round of review with the Student Affairs Administrative Team and given supervisors determines the nominees to be presented to the screening committee for award consideration.
  • An screening committee, comprised of staff from representative departments across Student Affairs, along with a representative from a campus unit external to Student Affairs, reviews the selected nominees. In the event a committee member is also a nominee, that committee member will not participate in the discussion for the given award. The committee confers and determines its recommended award recipient in each category.
  • The Vice President for Student Affairs reviews the committee’s recommended recipients and makes a final determination of recipients in each category.
  • In the event a particular category does not receive sufficient nominations or yield a recommended recipient, the Vice President or a designee makes a determination of whether and to whom the award may be given.
  • Award recipients are announced at the Annual Student Affairs Celebration at the end of each academic year.

Staff Awards Nomination Form

Preview Nomination Form

Interested in viewing the questions asked in the nomination form before you begin? Click the button to the right!

Staff Awards Descriptions

Additional information about each Student Affairs Staff Award

Previous Award Winners

Staff Awards

The Student Affairs Staff Awards, given to deserving staff across the division and the University, recognize outstanding accomplishments and leadership in student affairs at the University of Georgia.

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Staff Resources

Staff

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Staff Development

Staff Development opportunities in UGA Student Affairs range from large scale to small scale, workshop style to conferences.

Staff development initiatives created and facilitated by Student Affairs Staff Development are designed to:

  • provide staff with resources to effectively perform their assigned roles and responsibilities
  • foster staff connection and collaboration across the division
  • develop exemplary leaders within the field of student affairs
  • contribute to staff members’ professional learning
  • foster a shared sense of community in UGA Student Affairs

We utilize this guiding philosophy and a foundational framework to plan its staff development initiatives. The foundational framework is comprised of two components – the UGA Student Affairs mission statement and an annual theme of emphasis. Connection to the three tenets of Engagement, Intellect, and Character promotes a mission-oriented approach to staff members’ work.

An annual theme provides opportunity to be responsive to staff members’ needs and adaptable to trends within higher education while also giving structure to the content. The annual theme selected for 2018-2019 is thriving leadership. This theme was chosen based on feedback from staff and members of Leadership Team regarding the desire and need for leadership development across all position types in the Division.


Annual Events


 

Student Affairs Kick-Off
 

July

Gather with UGA Student Affairs colleagues as we start off the new year with an opportunity to connect with one another and prepare for the upcoming semester as the campus community returns from winter break. Drop in to this “come and go” event as your schedule permits.

 

Engage! Conference

September

Join academic and student affairs professionals, support staff, and campus partners from schools across the southeast at one of the region’s premiere one-day events. More than 30 sessions in a jam-packed day of professional learning, networking, and colleagueship for faculty and staff to Engage!

 

Innovate Teams

December

An opportunity for staff from across UGA Student Affairs to gather and address some of the division's critical questions, participants will engage in a three-day modified Design Sprint (a model developed at Google Ventures) where they identify innovative solutions to pressing challenges, engage in mutual learning, and build and strengthen relationships.

 

State of the Division Address

February

Join Vice President Wilson as he addresses the connection between institutional and divisional priorities, as well as recognize the accomplishment of UGA Student Affairs in the wake of the State of the University Address.

 

Annual Student Affairs Celebration

May

Help us bring the school year to a close with the Annual Student Affairs Award Celebration. The formal program includes an awards component that recognizes individuals and groups nominated by fellow colleagues while the informal portion of the event provides opportunity for networking. Join us in celebrating the significant accomplishments of our staff and of the division!

 

 

 

Ongoing Events


 

Coffee & Conversations

A new monthly event, Coffee & Conversations is hosted by various departments across the division. Join fellow staff members in community building and celebrating the work our colleagues are doing while enjoying a hot beverage!

 

New Staff Welcome

New Staff Welcome is a one-day session offered on a quarterly basis to all staff new to UGA Student Affairs. It serves as one component of a multi-pronged approach to new staff on-boarding. New Staff Welcome sessions are designed for participants to receive a cursory knowledge of UGA and the Division of Student Affairs, to understand their contributions to advancing the division, and to establish connections with colleagues throughout UGA Student Affairs.

New Staff Reconnect

New Staff Reconnect is an opportunity for each New Staff Welcome cohort to reconvene, renew acquaintences, and catch up.

 

Partner Programs

Interested in other staff development opportunities? Check out our Staff Development Calendar for programming offered by other Student Affairs departments and across the university. Don't see your program on our calendar? Send us an email!

 

Workshops

The 2018-2019 staff development workshops feature a curriculum designed for staff to explore what makes them great!

In this hour-long workshop, each staff member will use results from CliftonStrengths StrengthsFinder self-assessment to build an introductory understanding of their StrengthsFinder Themes and explore how their Themes influence their work, relationships with colleagues and students, and contributions to the development of communities in which students at UGA thrive.

 

Workshop Requests

Do you have a workshop for your department that you would like an outside facilitator for? Participated in a workshop in the past and want us to bring it back to your department for a refresher?  

Please use the link below to request a workshop from our department. Sample workshops that we can facilitate for your team or department are listed below. We look forward to hearing from you!

Topics:

  • Leadership
  • Establishing Expectations in the Workplace
  • Resolving Conflicts
  • Essential Conversations Workshop
  • StrengthsFinder 
  • Finding One’s Purpose
  • Vision and Strategic Planning
  • Examining Work Styles and Working Together

To request an workshop tailored to your group, please fill out our request form below.

Staff Development Calendar

Staff Development Workshop Request Form

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Staff Recognition

Thank you, Student Affairs Staff!

 

The Division of Student Affairs strives to recognize staff for their contributions to the division and to the profession, and encourages staff to nominate themselves and their coworkers for outstanding work.


The Annual Student Affairs Celebration is a time for recognizing staff accomplishments and contributions to Student Affaris. Occurring during the university's staff appreciation week, it's a time for staff to network and build community with colleagues across the division.

Check out our Professional Award Opportunities page for information on upcoming national and regional awards and a tutorial on how to write a compelling award nomination!

Interested in recognizing coworkers across the Division, or being recognized yourself? Give our Staff Spotlight page a look to access the nomination form, as well as read about the incredible staff across the division who have been highlighted so far.

Staff Awards

Staff Spotlights: Sharing the stories of staff in UGA Student Affairs

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Staff Awards

The Student Affairs Staff Awards, given to deserving staff across the division and the University, recognize outstanding accomplishments and leadership in student affairs at the University of Georgia.

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Staff Matters

What is Staff Matters?


We believe that our staff, and the impact they make in the lives of students and colleagues at the University of Georgia, matters. We are fortunate to have incredible people dedicated to create opportunities and experiences for UGA’s students so they may engage meaningfully, grow intellectually, and build character.

 

As such, each year UGA Student Affairs intentionally curates a series of large and small scale developmental opportunities for staff so they themselves may continue to grow as people and professionals to support their mission of inspiring students to create thriving communities. Staff Matters is more than just staff development, however. In an effort to make services and resources for staff more accessible, we've curated this page to help you find what you need to be successful as a staff member of UGA Student Affairs. 

 

 

For more information, check out the sidebar to discover more information about:

  • New Staff
  • Staff Development
  • Staff Recognition
  • Staff Resources & Business Affairs

Have any questions or concerns? Have an idea for a staff development opportunity? Please contact Staff Development at ugasastaff@uga.edu or 706-542-8229.

 


Staff Development Calendar

Nominate someone to be recognized for their hard work!

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Student Affairs Staff Awards: Previous Winners

Commitment to Excellence Award

  • 2019-2020: Beau Seagraves
  • 2018-2019: Sharon Bowden, University Health Center
  • 2017-2018: Kristy Walker, University Housing

Commitment to an Inclusive Community Award

  • 2019-2020: CAPS Multicultural Services Committe, University Health Center
    • Krista Garrett
    • Maggie Gibbs
    • Erin Higgenbotham
    • Deonna Kitwana
    • Lauren Pucci
    • Kevin Rowland
    • Fengkan Zhu
  • 2018-2019: Norma Nuñez, Multicultural Services & Programs
  • 2017-2018: LGBT Resource Center Liaison Program
    • Samantha Adair, Disability Resource Center
    • Rosa Arroyo, Undergraduate Admissions
    • Cat Ashe, Disability Resource Center
    • Shannon M. Bowles, University Health Center
    • Kali DeWald, Career Center
    • Kim Ellis, University Housing
    • Michael Husted, Ramsey Student Center
    • Katy Janousek, University Health Center
    • Heather LaBarbera, Student Athletics
    • Rachel Peoples, College of Veterinary Sciences
    • Veronica Pennington, College of Veterinary Sciences

Graduate Assistant of the Year

  • 2019-2020: Montse Molas, Recreational Sports
  • 2018-2019: Ansley Long, Student Care and Outreach
  • 2017-2018: Julia Buwick, Student Care and Outreach
  • 2016-2017: Elizabeth "Liz" Delaney, Tate Student Center
  • 2015-2016: Betsy Collins, University Housing​

Emerging Leader Award

  • 2019-2020: Kaitlyn Shepard, Student Transitions
  • 2018-2019: Ben Cecil, International Student Life
  • 2017-2018: Trish Barefiled, Disability Resource Center

Innovation Award

  • 2019-2020: UHC Behavioral Health Integration Team, University Health Center
    • Heather Buffington
    • Hannah Craswell
    • Michael Creech
    • Jennifer Hester
    • Alicia Talbird
    • Ash Thompson
    • Finbar Woitalla
  • 2018-2019: University Housing Assignments Office
    • Kim Felker
    • Jessica Keever
    • Yaminah Moses
    • Suszanne Reichner
    • Jonathan Suits
    • Ernesta White

Lifelong Learner

  • 2019-2020, Stevie Stigler, University Health Center
  • 2018-2019: Taylor Cain, Tate Student Center - Center for Student Activities & Involvement
  • 2017-2018: Fred Reifsteck, University Health Center

New Professional of the Year

  • 2019-2020, Jessica Keever, University Housing
  • 2018-2019: Liana Natochy, University Health Center
  • 2017-2018: Danni Keane, Tate Student Center
  • 2016-2017: Travis Brown, Tate Student Center 
  • 2015-2016: Kristin Short, Tate Student Center

Support Staff Member of the Year

  • 2019-2020: Linden Mathis, International Student Life
  • 2018-2019: Lee Fowler, LGTB Resource Center, Academic Partnerships & Initiatives, Tate Student Center
  • 2017-2018: Tammie Martin, Disability Resource Center

Supervisor of the Year

  • 2019-2020, Carrie Smith, Student Care & Outreach
  • 2018-2019: Lance Haynie, Recreational Sports
  • 2017-2018: Carla Dennis, University Housing

Vice President's Dwight Douglas

  • 2019-2020: Nicole McConnell, Engagement, Leadership, & Service
  • 2018-2019: 
    • Carrie Smith, Student Care and Outreach
    • Keith Wenrich, Recreational Sports
  • 2017-2018
    • Charisse Harper, Tate Student Center
    • Jennifer Erickson-Brown, Student Affairs Learning and Strategic Initiatives

Legacy Awards

These awards are no longer active


Commitment to Diversity & Inclusion

  • 2016-2017: Rick Gibson, University Housing
  • 2015-2016: chee ia yang, International Student Life

Dwight Douglas Award for Service to the Division

  • 2016-2017: Gerry Kowalski, University Housing
  • 2015-2016: Brian Williams, Recreational Sports

Friend of the Division

  • 2016-2017: Rosa Arroyo-Driggers, UGA Admissions & Wade LaFontaine, UGA Admissions 
  • 2015-2016: Eddie Watson, Center for Teaching & Learning

Leading the Way

2017-2018: Transfer Student Experience

  • Jan Barham, Tate Student Center
  • Taylor Cain, Tate Student Center
  • Allysa Clagett, Tate Student Center
  • Nicole McConnell, Tate Student Center

Leaving a Legacy

  • 2016-2017: Halsey and Lisha Wise
  • 2015-2016: Tom Cochran

Lee Anne Seawell Award for Service to Students

  • 2016-2017: Jackie Minus, International Student Life 
  • 2015-2016: Claudia Shamp, Greek Life

Living the Mission

  • 2016-2017: Student Veterans Resource Center Team
  • 2015-2016: University Union
    • Taylor Cain, Tate Student Center
    • Tory Cutting, Tate Student Center
    • Liz Delaney, Tate Student Center

Outstanding Adjunct Faculty Member

  • 2016-2017: Dr. Jan Davis Barham, Tate Student Center
  • 2015-2016: Beau Seagraves, Office of the Dean of Students

Outstanding Campus Collaboration

  • 2016-2017: Dawg Camp
    • Kyle Anderson, CLS, Dawg Camp Classic City
    • Tony Blasucci, Recreational Sports, Dawg Camp Adventure
    • Jackie Boker, Dawg Camp Fusion (not pictured)
    • Taylor Cain, Tate Student Center, Dawg Camp Connect
    • Ben Cecil, ISL, Dawg Camp Odyssey
    • Josh Fulmer, Recreational Sports, Dawg Camp Adventure
    • Kellie Gerbers, Recreational Sports, Dawg Camp Adventure
    • Eddie Higginbotham, Center for Leadership and Service
    • Miles Johnson,  University Housing, Dawg Camp Adventure 
    • Terrance Smith, Alumni Association, Dawg Camp Fusion 
  • 2015-2016: #OneUGA
    • Carrie Campbell, University Housing
    • Ariella Perry, University Housing
    • Felicia Harris, University Housing
    • Zoe Johnson, Multicultural Services & Programs
    • Jason Wallace, Multicultural Services & Programs

Unsung Hero

  • 2016-2017: Jane Hillsman, Office of the Vice President of Student Affairs
  • 2015-2016: Susan Cowart, Office of the Vice President of Student Affairs

Vice President's Award for Distinguished Leadership

  • 2016-2017: Jean Chin, MD, MBA, FACP, University Health Center
  • 2015-2016: Emmie Bennett, Student Conduct

Staff Awards Nomination Form

Staff Awards

The Student Affairs Staff Awards, given to deserving staff across the division and the University, recognize outstanding accomplishments and leadership in student affairs at the University of Georgia.

Contact Us

ugasastaff@uga.edu

408 Memorial Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, GA 30602

James Crawford
Student Affairs Staff Development Lead
jcrawford@uga.edu
 

Matthew Waller
Chief of Staff
mewaller@uga.edu

Vice President Wilson Recognized for Giving Back

Vice President Victor K. Wilson welcomes students into Memorial Hall

Vice President Wilson receives 2017 Insight Into Diversity Magazine Giving Back Award

February 16, 2017

Athens, Ga.—Today, Victor K. Wilson, vice president for Student Affairs, received the 2017 Giving Back Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, the oldest and largest diversity and inclusion publication in higher education. The Giving Back Award honors college and university administrators who go above and beyond their everyday leadership duties and “give back” to their campuses and communities. Vice President Wilson will be featured, along with 38 other recipients, in the April 2017 Leadership Support and Giving Back issue of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. 

"Our students bring a myriad of perspectives and contributions that distinguish the University," Wilson said. "It’s incumbent on Student Affairs to be a leader on campus in welcoming this diversity and to applaud our students for making our community dynamic and impactful." 

Giving Back Award recipients were nominated by their colleagues and selected by INSIGHT Into Diversity based on their outstanding demonstration of social responsibility; involvement with students, faculty, staff, and the community; and commitment to serving underrepresented populations. Each honoree is recognized for his or her passion, dedication, and support for diversity and inclusion.

"Vice President Wilson is the embodiment of the University’s commitment to diversity and our efforts to provide a welcoming and inclusive environment for everyone," said Michelle Cook, associate provost and chief diversity officer for the University. "Student Affairs is a leader on our campus in promoting these values of diversity and inclusion throughout the university community.”

“The Giving Back Award is being awarded to leaders of institutions of higher education who exemplify what it truly means to ‘give back’ to others,” says Holly Mendelson, publisher of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. “These administrators are role models, and we honor their efforts to promote diversity and inclusion on their campuses and in their communities.”

Other recipients of the 2017 Giving Back Award include:

Sefa Aina, Pomona College Philip S. Bailey, PhD, California Polytechnic State University
Andra Basu, PhD, MEd, Lehigh Carbon Community College
Venessa A. Brown, PhD, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Marc Burnett, Tennessee Technological University
Marie Chisholm-Burns, PharmD, MPH, MBA, FCCP, FASHP, FAST, University of Tennessee Health Science Center
Kathryn B. Chval, PhD, University of Missouri
Patrick Coggins, PhD, JD, EdS, Stetson University
Daryll Coleman, PhD, Lane College
Deborah Deas, MD, University of California, Riverside
Gail DePuy, PhD, University of Louisville
William E. Easterling, PhD, The Pennsylvania State University
Nitza Milagros Escalera, JD, EdM, Fordham University
Greer Glazer, RN, PhD, CNP, FAAN, University of Cincinnati
Natalie Gibson, Kentucky Community and Technical College System
Craig Hillemeier, MD, Penn State Health
Lisa Kirtman, PhD, California State University, Fullerton
Paul L. Koch, PhD, University of California, Santa Cruz
Ming Li, EdD, Western Michigan University
Elizabeth G. Loboa, PhD, University of Missouri
Linda Logan, PhD, Olivet College
Patrice Gouveia Marks, PhD, Raritan Valley Community College
Shane P. Martin, PhD, Loyola Marymount University
Maureen A. O'Rourke, JD, Boston University
Rafael Ortega, MD, Boston University
Tonantzin Oseguera, EdD, California State University, Fullerton
Jennifer Rosato Perea, JD, DePaul University
Clyde Wilson Pickett, MEd, Community College of Allegheny County
Yasmin S. Purohit, PhD, Robert Morris University
Fatima Rodriguez-Johnson, SUNY Geneseo
Paula T. Silver, PhD, Widener University
William Silver, PhD, Sonoma State University
Kelli Sinclair, Waubonsee Community College
Christina Swaidan, EdD, MEd, Westfield State University
Charles Taber, PhD, Stony Brook University
David E. Thomas, EdD, MEd, Community College of Philadelphia
Gregory Townsend, MD, University of Virginia
Roberta J. Wilburn, EdD, ThD, Whitworth University

A call for nominations for the Giving Back Award was announced in October 2016. Award recipients include administrators of both community colleges and baccalaureate-granting institutions.

For more information about the 2017 Giving Back Award and INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, visit insightintodiversity.com.

The Office of the
Vice President
for Student Affairs

306 Memorial Hall
Athens, GA 30602
706-542-3564
askstudentaffairs@uga.edu

 

Directions

From the Tate Center Parking Deck, take the elevator to the 3 rd floor. Walk across the courtyard with the UGA bookstore on your left hand side. Take the stairs up to the street. Cross Sanford Drive. Memorial Hall will be directly in front of you. Stay on the left side of the building and walk around to the side entrance for disability access. From the side door you can take the elevator to the third floor. If an elevator is not needed walk up all the stairs on the side of Memorial Hall and turn right, there you will see Reed Quad. Walk up the steps with the columns to the main entrance of the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.

For directions please call 706-542- 3564.

Location and Directions

Map

 

Directions

From the Tate Center Parking Deck, take the elevator to the 3 rd floor. Walk across the courtyard with the UGA bookstore on your left hand side. Take the stairs up to the street. Cross Sanford Drive. Memorial Hall will be directly in front of you. Stay on the left side of the building and walk around to the side entrance for disability access. From the side door you can take the elevator to the third floor. If an elevator is not needed walk up all the stairs on the side of Memorial Hall and turn right, there you will see Reed Quad. Walk up the steps with the columns to the main entrance of the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs.

For directions please call 706-542- 3564. 

Memorial Hall, which houses:

- Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs
- Academic Programs and Initiatives
- International Student Life
- LGBT Resource Center
- Multicultural Services and Programs
- Student Conduct
- Student Affairs Communications and Marketing Initiatives
- Student Affairs Assessment and Staff Development
- Student Affairs Development
- Collegiate Recovery Community

Memorial Hall, which houses: - Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs - Academic Programs and Initiatives - International Student Life - LGBT Resource Center - Multicultural Services and Programs - Student Conduct - Student Affairs Communications and Marketing Initiatives - Student Affairs Assessment and Staff Development - Student Affairs Development - Collegiate Recovery Community

The Office of the
Vice President
for Student Affairs

306 Memorial Hall
Athens, GA 30602
706-542-3564
askstudentaffairs@uga.edu

Celebrating this Year's
Student Affairs Successes - 2016-2017

Division Accomplishments

 

Advanced the five-year strategic plan for UGA Student Affairs. 

  • Realized fully or are actively addressing two-thirds (66%) of division level measures of success for the Student Affairs 2020 Strategic Plan (91 of 138), with an additional 30% of division measures (42) currently in cue for future action
  • Demonstrated annual progress from all 18 Student Affairs departments toward planned 2020 department-level contributions to the Strategic Plan

 

Integrated the new university experiential learning standards into the ongoing implementation of the Student Affairs learning framework.

  • Documented more than a million unique interactions by Student Affairs departments through programs and services in FY17
  • Received University approval of five Student Affairs learning experiences for the experiential learning transcript and requirement. Submitted 13 additional experiences for consideration
  • Completed a full division-wide Student Affairs program inventory to prioritize future experiential learning submissions

 

Continued to support the University’s comprehensive campaign.

  • Increased total giving to Student Affairs by 106% from the previous year (to $5.6M in FY17)
  • Increased the number of donors to Student Affairs by 24% from the previous year (728 donors in FY17, including 457 first-time donors to Student Affairs)
  • Increased total gifts to Student Affairs by 19% (1,452 gifts in FY17)
  • Ended the fiscal year at 108% of our $10.5M campaign goal

 

Advanced updates to the foundational statements for Student Affairs to convey effectively and succinctly the division’s mission, vision, and values​.

 

Continued to pursue branding and communications strategies to convey our mission more effectively.

  • Increased year-on-year web traffic between 25% and 100% over 15 departments
  • Increased department-level engagement via social media platforms, including interactions with fellow departments, encouragement of students to follow pages, and use of direct messaging

 

Planned effectively for future facility transition in University Housing​.

  • Received approval and initiated the Russell Hall renovation project in spring 2017

 

Assumed an integral role in responses to the University campus climate assessment findings.

  • Student Affairs hosted the UGA Student Working Group on Campus Climate, which presented recommendations to senior leaders in March 2017

 

Student Affairs Departmental Accomplishments

 

Academic Partnerships & Initiatives

  • Launched the Student Affairs Faculty Research Grant program, awarding three initial faculty grants
  • Created a new Student Affairs Faculty Fellows program

 

Center for Leadership & Service

  • Received funding from the Richard B. Russell Foundation to enhance Leadership UGA, including expanding participants and program length and incorporating a new community-based internship
  • Serve Athens expanded from 5 to 8 community partners and recruited a record 227 student volunteers through 30 volunteer projects

 

Disability Resource Center

  • Transitioned to a new online data management system that improves student and faculty use of accommodations, test scheduling and delivery, and data access
  • Ensured seamless access and services for students and faculty through ongoing renovations of Clark Howell Hall and temporary relocation of the office

 

Greek Life

  • Established a formalized “package” of required student educational programs, called Greek Essentials
  • Trained more than 200 student leaders in suicide prevention

 

International Student Life

  • Established a credit-bearing cultural awareness course to start in Fall 2017
  • Developed a more robust World Leader training program to complement international student orientation

 

LGBT Resource Center

  • Quadrupled participation in Safe Space Training (to more than 400 participants in FY17)
  • Expanded LGBT Resource Center Liaisons Program

 

Multicultural Services & Programs

  • Expanded student programming for Women’s and Native History Months
  • Continued to increase programming and student utilization of The Intersection

 

Office of Student Conduct

  • Finalized revisions to the Code of Conduct, incorporating new mandated minimal procedural safeguards
  • Trained 28 new student Hearing Administrators, strengthening strategic partnerships with stakeholders

 

Recreational Sports

  • Completed the major natatorium pump room renovation in partnership with UGA Athletics and Finance and Administration
  • Introduced successfully the Competitive Sports Unlimited Play Pass

 

Student Affairs Communications & Marketing Initiatives

  • Published a digital Annual Report that enhanced integration into and referencing from division websites, emails, and social media
  • Produced a promotional video about the four Greek Councils

 

Student Affairs Development

  • Increased total giving, donors, and faculty/staff giving to the division
  • implemented a new year-long Philanthropy Institute, training four staff members in FY17

 

Student Affairs Learning and Strategic Initiatives (formerly Assessment & Staff Development)

  • Implemented a process to track participation across Student Affairs departments for use in dashboarding and institutional predictive analytics
  • Administered and responded to the 2016 Staff Survey, which provided baseline data regarding employee engagement, perceptions of the work environment, and staff understanding of inclusive excellence

 

Student Care and Outreach

  • Created processes for systematic use of data to track student interaction, connect with students who complete university withdrawals, and follow-up with students who receive hardship withdrawals
  • Partnered with Fanning Institute to transition responsibility for EMBARK@UGA to Student Care & Outreach

 

Student Veterans Resource Center

  • Launched a successful pilot of the Readiness Coaching Program
  • Developed a successful construct to support the Persistent Coaching Program

 

Tate Student Center

  • Hosted over 2.4 million visits during FY17 and fulfilled more than 40,000 requests for space
  • Continued facility updates to maximize space and accommodate increased traffic, including renovation of office spaces, reconceptualized lounges, and repurposing of underutilized areas

 

University Health Center

  • Received a flawless Joint Commission Lab Reaccreditation
  • Redesigned the access model in Counseling and Psychiatric Services, which increased student satisfaction, reduced wait time to first appointment, and increased access

 

University Housing

  • Conducted a major upgrade of the wireless network in the residence halls to increase service levels
  • Received approval for and began the renovation of Russell Hall, while also managing a brick replacement project at Oglethorpe House

 

University Testing Services

  • Identified a replacement system (RegisterBlast) for the current scheduling and payment software to increase efficiency, allow easy access for test scheduling and submitting payments, and viewing orders online
  • Ensured seamless access and services for students and faculty through ongoing renovations of Clark Howell Hall and temporary relocation of the office

Inspiring Success!

Hard to believe, but it has been four amazing years as your Vice President at UGA.

Today, I am more confident and inspired than ever in our ability to create magic for students, enriching student learning and supporting student development and growth in so many ways.

With all that we have accomplished — and we should be proud — I truly believe the best is yet to come. Every single one of you make that promise possible.

As always, thank you for all that you do #forthestudents, and best wishes for a fantastic upcoming year.

Be well,

Victor K. Wilson
Vice President for Student Affairs